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The Diplomat
MUMBAI — In December, India wrapped up its long-awaited Personal Data Protection Bill (PDF) that seeks to preserve “consent” in data sharing and penalizes breaches of privacy. Pending parliamentary approval, the bill will define the country’s legal framework in the digital age and coincides with government policies aiming to control residents of the world’s largest democracy; including the use of advanced technology to track them.

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Tech Republic
Human rights advocates have called on the Australian government to protect the rights of all in an era of change, saying tech should serve humanity, not exclude the most vulnerable members of society.

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Engineering & Technology
Technologies like AI will further evolve this decade. AI will combine with 5G to disrupt many processes and enhance the user experience in the case of devices.

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Gulf News
Dubai: A total of 1,272 investors in Dubai were granted Gold Card visas last year, the General Directorate of Residency and Foreigners Affairs in Dubai (GDRFA) announced on Monday.

Editor’s Note: One central argument behind facial recognition is that it can make lives easier. Here a report from the UAE looks at a system that uses biometrics instead of passports or IDs.

Venture Beat
A bipartisan group in Congress is working on legislation that could regulate the use of facial recognition by the private sector, federal government, and law enforcement.

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One Zero
The U.S. military is spending more than $4.5 million to develop facial recognition technology that reads the pattern of heat being emitted by faces in order to identify specific people. The technology would work in the dark and across long distances, according to contracts posted on a federal spending database.

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Reuters
WASHINGTON — A U.S. congressional report called for sanctions against China over human rights abuses, and for U.S. officials to keep rights concerns in mind during dealings with Beijing, including trade negotiations.

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Northeastern University
With the introduction of new export controls on artificial intelligence software last week, the White House appealed to lawmakers, businesses, and European allies to avoid overregulation of artificial intelligence. It also maintained its refusal to participate in a project proposed by the Group of Seven leading economies, which seeks to establish shared principles and regulations on artificial intelligence, as the U.S. prepares to take over the presidency of the organization this year.

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Reuters
SEOUL – In cram school-obsessed South Korea, students fork out for classes in everything from K-pop auditions to real estate deals. Now, top Korean firms are rolling out artificial intelligence in hiring – and jobseekers want to learn how to beat the bots.

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Venture Beat
This week, the White House released 10 “AI Principles,” intended as guidance for federal agencies while they consider how to appropriately regulate AI in the private sector. It’s an effort to help reduce the potential harms of AI that have been under scrutiny all over the world, while maintaining the benefits to society AI can bring. This is a moment the industry has been waiting for because of lingering uncertainty around how the US government will work to control this powerful technology and to ensure it doesn’t hurt people more than it helps.

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Mashable
I plopped into the front seat, expecting to laugh in the face of the machine attempting to measure my age, gender, emotional state, and comfort level all through infrared cameras and other sensors. But sitting expectantly in the car, equipped with French automotive software company Valeo’s Smart Cocoon 4.0 system, I was flabbergasted when it pinpointed my exact age.

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The Guardian
Football supporters and civil rights activists have expressed anger and concern over the use of facial recognition technology for a derby match in south Wales.

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Find Biometrics
Facial recognition software has been installed in 30 self-service ticket machines by Beijing Railway in anticipation of the increase in travellers for the Spring Festival.

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The Conversation
The Conversation UK receives funding from these organisations

Editor’s Note: This Distill deals with facial recognition by machines, but it is also a skill for humans. Here researchers from the UK and Qatar discuss “super-recognizers”

Telecoms.com
A new ad campaign by Chinese operator China Telecom promotes the enhanced spying and informing capabilities that 5G will bring.

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Inc 42
By the end of January, govt plans to have functional CCTV cameras installed at 17 locations

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Boston.com
The Cambridge City Council has unanimously voted to ban the public use of facial recognition technology. The decision makes Cambridge the fourth (and largest) Massachusetts community to issue such a ban, following similar initiatives in Somerville, Brookline, and Northampton.

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The Spoon
Luckin, one of China’s largest coffee chains, announced this week in a press release two new offerings aimed at getting coffee to consumers as quickly and conveniently as possible: the Luckin Coffee EXPRESS smart unmanned coffee machine and the Luckin Pop Mini smart vending machine. Both machines are part of Luckin’s push further into the world of self-service locations, what the company calls “the unmanned retail market” in an effort to reach more customers and stay competitive with its chief rival, Starbucks.

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Harvard Crimson
The Cambridge City Council unanimously approved a measure to ban the use of facial recognition technology in a 9-0 vote Monday night.

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Venture Beat
People walk past a poster simulating facial recognition software at the Security China 2018 exhibition on public safety and security in Beijing, China October 24, 2018.

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Economic Times (Times of India)
BENGALURU: As India plans to roll out a nationwide facial recognition system this year, Infosys co-founder Kris Gopalakrishnan believes that the country must develop its own databases for efficient implementation of breakthrough technologies that use artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Editor’s Note: Several of the articles on this list deal with India, though an Infosys founder says that his country needs to change its system for facial recognition, particularly as it is not often trained on Indian faces.

Mashable
First, they stopped facial recognition from coming to Coachella. Now they want to protect universities.

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South China Morning Post
Passengers go through security checks at the Dongzhimen subway station in Beijing.

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Xinhua
BEIJING — Millions of Chinese are travelling smarter, faster, more efficiently and more comfortably than ever before after one of the world’s largest human migrations got underway last Friday.

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AP
PHILADELPHIA — Philadelphia International Airport will soon begin testing biometric screening on some international flights.

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