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  • Clearview AI: bombshell from NYT
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The New York Times
A little-known start-up helps law enforcement match photos of unknown people to their online images — and “might lead to a dystopian future or something,” a backer says.

Editor’s Note: This story was the big facial recognition news of the week, and we recommend reading it. Here, Kasmir Hill and NYT dig into Clearview AI and the tool it is providing to some law enforcement agencies.

Indian Express
Sundar Pichai’s support for the European Union’s temporary ban on the use of facial recognition has once again highlighted how the tech sector in general and the tech giants in particular have different views on how this new, but controversial, technology should be used.

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The Guardian
Draft white paper suggest prohibition lasting three to five years is being considered.

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Irish Times
Controversial facial recognition technology is being installed in the new national children’s hospital in order to prevent babies being snatched, local politicians in Dublin has been told.

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Financial Times ($)
Google chief says technology is ‘fraught with risks’ and urges assessment by regulators.

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Reuters
BRUSSELS – The EU’s proposal for a temporary ban on facial-recognition technology won backing from Alphabet Chief Executive Sundar Pichai on Monday but got a cool response from Microsoft President Brad Smith.

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The Conversation
Last fall, Drew Dilkens, the mayor of Windsor, Ont., set out to make the city the first Canadian urban centre to connect to the Amazon Ring network, which the company calls “the new neighbourhood watch.”

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Decrypt.co
Say goodbye to online privacy. A New York-based artificial intelligence company’s database of over three billion images, scraped from social media to create advanced facial recognition software, has raised concerns that AI is too advanced to be contained by regulation.

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Inc 42
All the airports will have this face recognition soon, the minister added.

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Find Biometrics
The House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Reform held its third hearing on facial recognition technology this week, as House members work on a bill aimed at regulating the use of this technology.

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South China Morning Post
Shanghai has begun rolling out a drug collection terminal equipped with facial recognition technology for people buying certain medicines at pharmacies and hospitals in an effort to stem abuse.

Editor’s Note: While Europe looks at curbing facial recognition technology, it is expanding in Shanghai. Here the South China Morning Post looks at terminals that scan patients’ faces if they are asking for medicines such as those with sedatives or psychotropics.

The Conversation
A million Uighurs and other Muslim minorities are now detained in a Chinese operation that combines the forced labour and re-education of Mao-era laogai with the post-9/11 rhetoric of the “war on terror.” U.S. President Donald Trump’s Muslim ban, border camps crowded with migrant children and America’s global archipelago of so-called black sites detaining terror suspects deserve condemnation. So too do the concentration camps of the world’s newest superpower.

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Gulf News
Dubai: Dubai Police are studying new ways and technology to protect children who might be forgotten inside school buses, an official said.

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Reuters
BRUSSELS – The European Union is considering banning facial recognition technology in public areas for up to five years, to give it time to work out how to prevent abuses, according to proposals seen by Reuters.

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The New York Times
The whole point of modern surveillance is to treat people differently, and facial recognition technologies are only a small part of that.

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Indian Express
Even if the result is negative, however, the person will be allowed to vote based on the prescribed process of identification using their ID card.

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CBS Chicago
As CBS 2’s Audrina Bigos reported Monday, the device amounts to eyeglasses that can read text and talk to you.

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EU Observer ($)
Even though AI legislation in Europe and the US is only starting to be addressed by public authorities, big tech companies are already asking to set common standards across the globe.

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Wall Street Journal ($)
An unsecured facial recognition database that contained info on thousands of children from 20 schools in China, half of which are located in historically ethnic Tibetan areas, has been found online.

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The New York Times
China may be using technology for surveillance, but it has also created a new engine of growth.

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Press Trust of India
HYDERABAD: In a first-of-its-kind in India, the Telangana State Election Commission will be using facial recognition app in a bid to counter impersonation by voters on a pilot basis in 10 selected polling stations.

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CBS Philadelphia
Some passengers at the Philadelphia International Airport will see a new security screening starting Tuesday. The airport is testing a new program to scan the faces of passengers leaving the airport on some international flights.

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Mashable
A Facebook photo from the end of college could come back to haunt you.

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Gizmodo
More than 70,000 photos of Tinder users are being shared by members of an online cyber-crime forum, Gizmodo has learned, raising concerns about the potential for abusive use of the photos. Ominously, only women appear to have been targeted.

Editor’s Note: Facial recognition programs are of course largely trained on photos. Here reporters from Gizmodo look at the appearance of a huge trove of women’s photos online and what it might mean.

AP
LONDON — When British police used facial recognition cameras to monitor crowds arriving for a soccer match in Wales, some fans protested by covering their faces. In a sign of the technology’s divisiveness, even the head of a neighboring police force said he opposed it.

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