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  • Microsoft hails Washington law
  • Marseille fights facial recognition
  • A passwordless future?
  • Detecting your emotions


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Geek Wire

Microsoft President Brad Smith took a break from responding to the COVID-19 outbreak Tuesday to praise Washington state’s landmark facial recognition regulations. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee signed a bill Tuesday that establishes rules specifically governing facial recognition software.


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Tech Dirt

Clearview’s facial recognition app links to a database of 4 billion pictures. And those photos are linked to all the data that got scraped up with them, culled (without permission) from sites like Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn… pretty much anywhere people post photos and personal information.


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NBC News

NBC News found more than 10 security companies in the U.S., Europe and China that are marketing technologies as capable of picking out who in a crowd is likely to have a fever, and thus a possible coronavirus case. These companies are actively pitching to police departments, government agencies, schools, hospitals and private businesses.


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CNN

As Covid-19 brings the world to a halt, some world leaders have spotted an opportunity to tighten their grip on power.


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Security Boulevard

In the second part of this blog series, I talked about how technology leaders are embracing the FIDO Alliance’s WebAuthN distributed approach to passwordless authentication to facilitate integration into numerous applications.


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Coda Story

The southern French city, once synonymous with urban crime, now encapsulates the spread of AI surveillance driven by Chinese companies.


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AI surveillance driven by Chinese companies is beginning to threaten the privacy of people in Marseille. Here, Morgan Meaker wonders whether the locals have genuinely embraced the technology.

TASS

The smart cameras bought by Moscow authorities from the NtechLab start-up company are capable of recognizing faces partially hidden under masks or headgear, a spokesperson for the company told TASS on Wednesday.


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Reuters

SAN FRANCISCO – Washington Governor Jay Inslee on Tuesday signed the first U.S. state law that sharply curbs law enforcement’s use of facial recognition technology, while civil rights activists said the measure did not go far enough to protect marginalized groups.


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Threat Post

The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo were officially postponed this week amid the ongoing, pandemic spread of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The Games will be moved to 2021, but in the meantime, technological innovation around the event will continue.


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AI Business

Given its reputation as a regulatory trendsetter, it’s fair to say that the European Commission’s (EC) recent AI White Paper was highly anticipated, as a culmination of years of painstaking efforts to prove itself as an AI thought leader.


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Forbes

The global security and cybersecurity market is experiencing a gigantic threat due in part to ongoing technological evolution and constant digital transformation.


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BBC

A senior intelligence officer rushes in to a meeting with the latest report and places it in front of anxious politicians and policymakers.


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Forbes

Artificial intelligence systems are being employed for a wide range of tasks from recognition systems to autonomous activities, from pattern and anomaly detection to predictive analytics and conversational systems, and many other aspects. One of the areas where AI has shown particular capability is in the area of recognition, from image recognition to speech and other aspects of pattern recognition.


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FinExtra

The importance of passive facial liveness detection is key for digital onboarding and a frictionless user experience.


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Facial recognition technology poses two questions: Is the correct person being identified and is a real person being presented? Steve Cook finds an answer to these questions.

National Law Review

Facial recognition is already in place and has, in some cases, began to replace contact-based systems. For example, facial recognition is being used in airports for security screenings, baggage drops, passport control and gate check-ins – and is largely being presented as an option to travelers to ease overcrowding and speed up processing time. Further, in March 2017, the President issued an executive order expediting the deployment of biometric verification of the identities of certain foreign travelers crossing U.S. borders


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Financial Times ($)

Three days after the Chinese government locked down Hubei, the province at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak, a local government official more than 1,000km away received data from telecoms carriers alerting her to a list of people who had left Hubei and entered her town.


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ZDNet

Microsoft is ending all minority investments in facial-recognition startups because it can’t check them for compliance.


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The Christian Science Monitor

Fionnuala D. Ní Aoláin, a United Nations special rapporteur for human rights, says emergency powers, once enacted, are rarely rolled back. “Even if they are created on the basis of being temporary aberrations, they essentially become permanent additions to the legal architecture of the state,” she warns.


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South China Morning Post

In comics, television and film, there is almost no hiding from Superman because of his powerful X-ray vision. The famous exception is his inability to see through lead.


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Next Gov

Immigration and Customs Enforcement wants to develop an offshoot of Lehigh County’s Gang Intelligence App over the next year.


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Express Computer

National Informatics Centre (NIC) is betting big on Artificial Intelligence (AI) for smooth implementation of several e-governance projects of the Centre and thorough transparency in execution of welfare schemes.


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Biometric Update

U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials are seeking quotes for a cloud-based, biometric facial recognition application that can help federal law enforcement officials “identify, track, disrupt and dismantle” transnational gangs operating in and around Washington D.C.


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IT News

The WA government has laid the groundwork to begin sharing driver’s licence information with the federal government’s controversial national facial biometrics matching database.


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The info from facial recognition often ends up in databases, combining data from states or countries into one big collection. Here IT News reports from Australia about Western Australia joining a national scheme.

Find Biometrics

The Russian government has been using a network of 100,000 facial recognition cameras to keep track of individuals that have been ordered to quarantine for 14 days.


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Reuters

WARSAW/BERLIN – Governments across Europe are turning to technology to track the spread of the coronavirus and monitor people under quarantine, an approach that seeks to learn from Asia but is also putting the region’s privacy rules to the test.


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