#12
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  • Japan tech firms leverage COVID-19 (#1)
  • Washington State’s law (#18+25)
  • Masks won’t prevent recognition
  • Smart toilet that can recognize (#12)


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Nikkei

TOKYO — With the coronavirus pandemic making consumers squeamish about using their fingers, some Japanese companies are rushing solutions to market.


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New York Daily News

Facial recognition surveillance systems are ominous. People see how these tools threaten privacy and civil liberties and consider ways they might resist being tracked and profiled everywhere they go. One option that is regularly tossed around is the idea of frustrating identification systems with clothing and accessories that obscure and distort our appearance.


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Huffington Post

Advanced facial recognition technology poses a mortal threat to privacy. It could grant the government, corporations and even average citizens the ability to capture a photo of anybody and, with a few keystrokes, uncover all kinds of personal details.


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There has been a lot of debate around facial recognition and ethics. Here, Luke O’Brien finds out how political elements are influencing the technology for their own benefit.

MIT Technology Review

As technology rapidly develops, the number of security and privacy concerns will only continue to grow. In this episode, we look at how companies can build cybersecurity into their business strategies — instead of scrambling to respond when a breach happens.


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Truthout

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to sweep the world, so too do radical new security measures implemented by governments in response to the global crisis. Ruling by decree, closing borders to refugees and instituting sweeping powers of detention and surveillance: In the context of the current panic, these policies may seem appropriate to some, their extremism justified by the extreme times in which we now live.


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The Hindu Business Line

While designing 3D-printable valves for ventilators or retooling production lines towards mask production is fine, developing quarantine-enforcing geo-fencing app or deploying drones for lockdown surveillance purposes may not be.


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Analytics Insight

For the last few years, Facial Recognition has generated lots of excitement across diverse private as well as public service domains. Meanwhile, the technology has also faced several controversies due to privacy, reliability, possible biases and lack of regulation.


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Facial recognition technology has continued to generate excitement around the world. However, there may be certain risks involved, as Analytics Insight reports.

Venture Beat

In a major about-face in public health policy, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams, and state and local health officials around the country recently began urging people to wear homemade face masks when they’re out in public.


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The Next Web

Despite the huge contributions of deep learning to the field of artificial intelligence, there’s something very wrong with it: It requires huge amounts of data. This is one thing that both the pioneers and critics of deep learning agree on. In fact, deep learning didn’t emerge as the leading AI technique until a few years ago because of the limited availability of useful data and the shortage of computing power to process that data.


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IT Pro Portal

Shortcomings of traditional forms of identity verification, such as passwords, have generated a need for alternative identification methods, opening the door for biometric authentication tools.


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Bloomberg

Margrethe Vestager, once Silicon Valley’s top foe, may turn into its best ally by pushing for the tighter oversight that Big Tech says it needs to be saved from itself.


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Stanford University

There’s a new disease-detecting technology in the lab of Sanjiv “Sam” Gambhir, MD PhD, and its No. 1 source of data is number one. And number two.


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After smart watches and smart wallets, here comes a smart toilet. A study by Stanford University reports about the development of a toilet that can not only recognize you, but also monitor your health.

Tech Crunch

The emergence of the novel coronavirus has left the world in turmoil. COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, has reached virtually every corner of the world, with the number of cases exceeding a million and the number of deaths more than 50,000 worldwide. It is a situation that will affect us all in one way or another.


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Slate

We can protect privacy in the time of pandemic and still use technology and data for public health and public good.


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FCW

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency is preparing to release an update to its Trusted Internet Connection program that will focus on the recent surge in telework among federal employees, FCW has confirmed.


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Biometric Update

A new camera which measures body temperature with high accuracy and speed has been developed by Dermalog for biometric fever screening to increase public safety.


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Global Banking and Finance

With US regulators questioning its efficacy, and regular reports that everything from photos to siblings can unlock mobile devices via facial recognition, businesses should be looking at stronger methods of authenticating access to their systems and managing credentials of their employees.


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Info Security

The law says the tech should only be used to identify missing persons, the deceased, and ‘for the purposes of keeping the public safe’.


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Venture Beat

When we came out of the financial crisis of 2008, cloud computing kicked into high gear and started to become a pervasive, transformational technology. The current COVID-19 crisis could provide a similar inflection point for AI applications.


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Find Biometrics

It’s ID Evolution Month at FindBiometrics, in which we’ll be delivering in-depth features on biometric innovation in the identity space.


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SAFR

As we continue to adjust to social distancing mandates, more experts are now recommending wearing face masks as another way to limit the spread of COVID-19. In situations and environments where SAFR face recognition is vital for security and secure access, face masks don’t negate its benefits.


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Analytics Insight

Facial recognition (FR) is enjoying a positive reception and widespread application these days. Enterprise, law enforcement and consumers are adopting FR to facilitate everything from administrative tasks, arresting suspects and unlocking cellphones.


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Press Trust of India

Despite widespread concerns on facial recognition expressed world over, a majority of Indians seem to be amenable to the usage of the controversial technology for various uses including by state authorities, a survey has found. Over three-fourths of 1,000 people surveyed said they support the use of facial recognition for law enforcement, the survey by cybersecurity firm Nortonlifelock has said.


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Computer Weekly

It has long been known that passwords are one of the weakest methods for authenticating users. One of the first examples of a password being compromised can be traced back to 413 BCE, when the Greek army used a pass-phrase for identification during a night-time battle.


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The Next Web

The tech giant lobbied for the new rules, which could set a precedent for future regulation


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