#13
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  • Police in Canada (#4+8)
  • QR codes in China (#13)
  • Biometric startup raises $100m (#12)
  • Multifactor authentication (#24)


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Associated Press

The drone glides up toward a high-rise until it reaches an apartment window where a woman waves from inside, proving to police that she is self-isolating after testing positive for the coronavirus.


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The Mainichi

TOKYO — As the coronavirus continues to spread across Japan, companies are speeding up their development and utilization of products featuring “touchless” technology that can be controlled without direct physical contact.


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The COVID19 pandemic has ensured that people are becoming more conscious about touching things around them. Here, The Mainichi reports how this cautiousness is helping Japan’s tech industry.

Find Biometrics

South Korea’s Shinhan Card is moving beyond physical payment cards with a new naked payments scheme. The Shinhan Face Pay system will allow users to make purchases with a facial recognition scan instead of a more traditional payment card.


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Toronto Star

Nnamdi Ogba was visiting a friend from his soccer team when he left a northwest Toronto apartment to pick up some food for his fiancée. As the 26-year-old electrical engineer approached his vehicle, key fob in hand, two men ran up behind him and, without words or glances exchanged, opened fire. Ogba was hit five times in the back. It was just after 11 p.m. on March 16, 2018. He was left to die in the parking lot.


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Biometric Update

The worldwide spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is changing the consumer behavior patterns dramatically. The growing mood of panic has led to either conscious or involuntarily avoidance of any physical contact between people.


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Irish Examiner

One of the country’s largest growers, packers and distributors of fresh produce is introducing facial recognition this week as part of its measures to protect their staff during the Covid-19 crisis.


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The Asian Age

Not only are we being subject to invasive apps, lists of infected people with their names and addresses have been made publicly available without their consent.


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The Tyee (British Columbia)

Its contract with Clearview AI started in October, but the force was still denying using the controversial technology three months later.


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ABC Australia

Australian Federal Police (AFP) officers trialled controversial facial recognition technology Clearview AI from late 2019, despite the agency initially denying any association with the company.


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Forbes

In late 2018, Google made the decision to prevent its “Smart Compose”—a feature that predicts what users intend to write in emails and auto-completes sentences—from suggesting gender-based pronouns such as “him”, her”, and “their”.


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Biometric Update

Morocco’s moratorium on the use of biometric facial recognition has been extended until the end of 2020, with a decision by the country’s CNDP (National Commission for the Control of the Protection of Personal Data) that leaves open possible trials and deployments of the technology in certain specific situations.


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Governments around the world are resorting to technologies such as facial recognition in order to deal with the coronavirus crisis. Here, Chris Burt of Biometric Update reports that Morocco plans to look into the technology, despite a general moratorium on its use.

Tech Crunch

Contactless transactions have become a major priority at a time when people all around the world are minimising their contact with others outside their households to slow down the often-insidious spread of the novel coronavirus. But if a lot of the consumer focus lately has been on things like payments or deliveries, that’s overlooking the fact that the “contactless” paradigm has been a big trend for years already.


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CNN

Imagine your daily routine being entirely dependent on a smart phone app. Leaving your home, taking the subway, going to work, entering cafes, restaurants and shopping malls — each move, dictated by the color shown on your screen. Green: you’re free to proceed. Amber or Red: you’re barred from entry.


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The Conversation

Israel’s top spy agency has been using secretly collected cellphone data to retrace the movements of those who tested positive for the coronavirus.


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Read Write

Organizations such as banks or financial institutions that offer any form of financial services or products are required to comply with government regulations. These regulations include such as things as Know Your Customer (KYC) and Anti-money Laundering (AML).


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IT Pro Portal

The concern of technology consumers over the extent of incursions into their privacy and the confidentiality of their data is nothing new, and it’s certainly a subject never far from the headlines. Just recently, there was a backlash in the press against unscrupulous tech companies that were accused of harvesting data gathered from facial recognition technology, and this sparked major concerns over data privacy.


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Economic Times (Times of India)

Tech platforms, telecom companies and governments need to come together at a time like this to work together towards addressing the balance between protecting individual privacy and data sharing that is critical to the public good.


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Analytics Insight

No one denies that something needs to be done to protect our online data. From January to March of 2019, over 1.9 billion records have been exposed. While businesses were the most commonly hacked, educational and medical institutions were also victims of fraudsters.


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There is a lot of debate around technologies like facial recognition and the threat that they pose to our privacy, with many articles in this Distill pointing out dangers. Here, Analytics Insight argues that we should look at the brighter side of things.

ANI

If students are told that they can take exams from home, they will probably be thrilled to say the least. While a handful who abhor the act of cheating would not even dream of indulging in it, the temptation to peek into a book or look for answers on the sly would be there for many.


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The Globe and Mail

The Health Kit app bases its determination on what city authorities have called “comprehensive multi-source data research and judgment,” which blends community information, disease control orders and data from highway, rail and air travel. It requires users to upload identification document images and pass a facial recognition screening before producing a green, yellow or red code: green is all clear, yellow signifies home isolation, while red mandates quarantine in a government-approved facility.


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Forbes

The COVID-19 pandemic doesn’t just threaten people’s health. It is also threatening people’s civil liberties across the globe. Even before this crisis, democracy was on the decline worldwide.


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Independent (Nigeria)

Africa is a place of digital opportunity. In a quickly-expanding tech market on the continent, there is an influx of electronic products that are reaching the hands of more and more Africans.


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Find Biometrics

Toronto-based biometrics specialist Invixium says it has been seeing “a significant rise in the demand for touchless biometric solutions” – and that this trend had started even before the COVID-19 pandemic that has prompted a global shift toward social distancing.


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Computer World

The pandemic means there is no time for security niceties, such as properly processing RFPs for apps that were thoroughly vetted. That brings us to MFA and why it has to be radically re-envisioned.


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Business Insider

A more practical solution may be adjusting your notifications settings so that you can view incoming alerts without unlocking your iPhone.


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