#14
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  • Ring and license plates (#3)
  • Surveillance system in Moscow (#11)
  • Use for exams in Australia (#8)
  • AI film casting (#15)


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Chicago Tribune

The chunky, thick-framed glasses Scott Urban makes in his Chicago workshop look like normal eye glasses, but when viewed on a security camera, the wearer’s face becomes a shining orb.


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There is a lot of debate around facial recognition technology threatening our privacy. Here, Ally Marotti reports about a new set of Chicago-made glasses that block facial recognition.

AI Business

In 2015, Bill Gates gave a Ted Talk on the biggest threat to the human population. Not a war. But a virus. Today, we live out this prediction. In 2018, Bill Gates’ company, Microsoft, was the first tech giant to warn of another threat to our way of life: facial recognition technology. Without proper regulation, we have started to witness the often-undetected spread of this technology, much like a virus taking over a host body.


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Ars Technica

Amazon wouldn’t be the first consumer company to do it, but it would be the biggest.


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Biometric Update

An entrepreneur is developing a small line of eyewear designed to shade the wearer’s eyes or entire face from facial recognition systems.


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Seattle Times

QALANDIA CHECKPOINT, West Bank – For tens of thousands of Palestinians in the West Bank, the daily voyage into Israel for work, family visits and other business begins at this checkpoint near Jerusalem, reminiscent of a passage through a prison portal. Concrete walls surround the gray building at the Qalandia crossing that looks part transit terminal, part military bunker. Inside, families squeeze large suitcases through a labyrinthine hallway to reach a set of high-tech turnstiles armed with something as controversial as the checkpoint itself: facial recognition scanners.


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IT Pro Portal

Creating challenging passwords with different characters was once the only way of securing your sensitive data. But as things got complex in life, so did the security it requires.


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Times of India

Chennai: Wearing masks to and at work places have become mandatory. Along with this, come a host of issues, be it unlocking your iPhone or marking your attendance in offices which have installed facial recognition software to capture your entry/exit time.


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ABC News (Australia)

Students are protesting a move by the Australian National University (ANU) to force them to install Proctorio, a remote monitoring program, on their personal computers for exams.


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Something this newsletter touches on ever once so often is education. The Australian National University (ANU) has now decided to use facial recognition software during exams that are being conducted remotely. Jake Evans wonders whether this decision invades the privacy of students.

Australian Computer Society

The identity of 378 World War I Diggers has been uncovered in Australia using facial recognition software.


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The Atlantic

The coronavirus has reignited the post-9/11 debate about security and civil liberties. The U.S. response to that tragedy has lessons for how to manage the trade-offs this time around.


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Vice

MOSCOW — There’s about 178,000 surveillance cameras set up all around the Russian capital, pretty much wherever you look, and some of them are already connected to facial recognition software that’s helped police arrest more than 300 people.


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Engineering & Technology

As we celebrate the bicentenary of her birth, discover how Florence Nightingale and her revolutionary use of data has more in common with future nursing than you might think.


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The Conversation

Whether you use Zoom, Skype or Microsoft Teams, the webcam on your home PC or laptop device has probably never been as active as it is during this pandemic.


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Biometric Update

Workers across the globe are preparing to return to their jobs, or looking forward to doing so, and biometrics companies are continuing to adapt their technologies to the challenges to identification and coronavirus spread-prevention in an era defined by physical distancing. Even those front-line workers and emergency responders still working in hazardous conditions require better protection, but several new products have been unveiled by businesses to address this dangerous situation.


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BBN Times

Leveraging AI for film making can help studios improve the quality of cinema produced, and can ensure better box-office returns.


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Find Biometrics

The thermal imaging trend continues. The latest offering is a new Temperature Detection & Face Recognition machine from India’s Secureye, which joins a growing roster of contactless temperature solutions that have emerged in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.


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The News (Pakistan)

In this history of humankind, there was hardly a time ever when their movement came to a collective halt on earth. The coronavirus has not only brought the world to a standstill, but it has also changed our lifestyle.


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Tech Crunch

Thermal imaging wearables used in China to detect COVID-19 symptoms could soon be deployed in the U.S.


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Government Technology

The heat-reading surveillance systems have been sold as a potential “virus spotter,” but state and local governments may be hesitant to adopt them over privacy and civil liberty concerns.


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Thermal Imaging is rapidly emerging as an area of great interest, especially due to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. Lucas Ropek wonders whether the technology will face civil liberty issues in the future.

Reuters

LONDON – From facial recognition to phone tracking, authorities have rolled out a vast range of surveillance tools to trace infections and enforce quarantines during the new coronavirus outbreak.


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Venture Beat

Researchers from Google Brain, Intel, OpenAI, and top research labs in the U.S. and Europe joined forces this week to release what the group calls a toolbox for turning AI ethics principles into practice. The kit for organizations creating AI models includes the idea of paying developers for finding bias in AI, akin to the bug bounties offered in security software.


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Tech Crunch

Embattled facial recognition startup Clearview AI is yet again the subject of scrutiny following reports that a security officer from an outside firm gained access to a cloud repository containing thousands of private files including the company’s source code.


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The Hindu Business Line

Bengaluru-based AI start-up Wesense.ai has developed a product called Healthsense to curb the spread of coronavirus and enable contact free workplaces. The start-up has already received orders for over 1,000 units of Healthsense from Bengaluru, Chennai and NCR, and significant enquiries from abroad, a top executive told BusinessLine.


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Nikkei

TOKYO — Chinese artificial intelligence powerhouse iFlytek has revealed a $13 million hit to earnings after it was sanctioned by the U.S. over its treatment of Uighur Muslims and other ethnic minorities.


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Security Boulevard

The 2020 Clearview AI data breach spawned hundreds of attention-grabbing headlines, and for good reason. The company works closely with law enforcement agencies and other entities by sharing personal information about millions of people, for a variety of purposes. The breach raised many questions about the vulnerability of personal data in general.


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