#15
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  • Facial recognition in cars (#1)
  • Utah pauses surveillance (#2+#10)
  • Amazon and blacklist firm (#6)
  • “Over-reliance on passwords” (#17)


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Associated Press

Distracted driving puts not only drivers on the road at risk but also passengers, cyclists and pedestrians. In 2018, it led to the deaths of 2,841 people, according to the most current data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.


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Facial recognition technology has started to enter into our lives in different forms. Reese Counts reports about the latest development – deploying facial recognition in cars.

OneZero

Documents reveal Damien Patton, CEO of SoftBank-backed Banjo, admitted to being a Neo-Nazi skinhead in his youth


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The Atlantic

There are much bigger worries than temporary stay-at-home orders.


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Reuters

Expanding surveillance measures to police Russia’s coronavirus lockdown, including the use of facial recognition technology and collection of personal data, need regulating to ensure they are temporary and proportionate, two rights groups said on Thursday.


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Digital Trends

Imagine if the ground could know if you’re walking on it.


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Reuters

Amazon and other companies are detecting employee fevers through thermal cameras.


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Gizmodo

Police in Westport, Connecticut, announced this week that they’re testing a so-called “pandemic drone” that can detect when people on the ground have fevers. The new drone platform will also be used to determine when people are closer than six feet to each other. Police will be able to deliver a verbal warning through the drone’s speaker to anyone not practicing social distancing.


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Tech Node

With China easing lockdown restrictions, some students’ long breaks from in-person classes are finally coming to an end. But as they return to school, they will need to prove their health to some high-tech security guards. China’s tech companies have been eager to position themselves as health surveillance providers, using QR codes, “smart gates,” and even smart payment devices to mass screen students while minimizing unnecessary human contact.


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The Conversation

The Australian National University (ANU) is facing a backlash from students over the proposed use of a digital platform to invigilate exams remotely. The university recently announced plans to use the Proctorio platform to ensure the legitimacy of exams conducted away from campus during the COVID-19 pandemic.


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Deseret News

SOUTH JORDAN — Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes announced Tuesday that the state has suspended use of the technology services of Park City-based Banjo after it was revealed company founder Damien Patton has past connections with a white supremacist group and was involved in a shooting at a Jewish synagogue in the early ’90s.


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New Indian Express

In post-Covid era, TS govt plans to ditch fingerprint-based attendance system as it is risky.


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Although facial recognition has become popular in recent years for a variety of uses, there are still question marks about its viability. Here, Aihik Sur wonders whether and how this technology may become the new normal after coronavirus.

Analytics Insight

With the roll-out of new technologies comes an abundance of excitement and hype. There is a hope for a better world where life is made more accessible by these technologies. 5G is one such anticipated thing.


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Geek Wire

RealNetworks, the 26-year-old streaming media pioneer that recently pivoted to developing facial recognition technology, today disclosed that it has received $2.87 million from the federal government’s Paycheck Protection Program.


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Biometric Update

Testing by Westport, Connecticut of a drone to collect biometric readings has been abruptly canceled due to outrage over perceived privacy violations. The data was collected to understand population patterns and to give first responders, public health authorities, and decision-makers quicker reaction times to ongoing public gatherings or other potential health threats.


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CTech

Israeli facial recognition startup Corsight AI Ltd. has raised a $5 million seed round, the company announced Thursday. The round was led by Canada-based homeland security fund AWZ Ventures Inc.


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Analytics Insight

Numerous nations have acquainted social distancing measures to slow down the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. This involves when outside individuals should remain at least 2 meters (6 feet) away from one another consistently. While this is anything but a troublesome prerequisite to meet for the vast majority, laborers in businesses that have been recognized as fundamental and keep on working during this present time of quarantine won’t discover it as simple to meet this rule.


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Verdict

The cybersecurity headaches that passwords can cause are now well-known.


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SecureID News

The coronavirus pandemic is already having a serious impact on identity technology and could bring about more changes when it comes to online, mobile and biometric forms of authentication and security.


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Biometric Update

New opportunities for biometric payments, particularly in smart cards, continue to generate headlines and attract new players, now including Google. Market projections and recent growth statistics show biometrics, particularly on mobile devices, are well positioned to meet new challenges and evolving requirements, from authenticating people working and banking from home to providing digitized identity credentials.


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Gizmodo

On the day Layla got out of prison and back to her home in Georgia, she was told she would need to purchase a smartphone — not an insignificant task for someone who’d just completed a sentence, but Layla was lucky to have a friend who could buy one for her.


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South China Morning Post

Secretary also offers reassurances ‘smart’ lamp post scheme has been modified following concerns over facial recognition cameras


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Biometric Update

Ring has responded to a report on a confidential survey sent to beta testers and shared with Ars Technica, denying it indicates that the company is looking into adding biometrics and other technologies to its home security service. The report says the Amazon subsidiary asked customers about their interest in surveillance capabilities such as object, facial, and license plate recognition, physical and remote camera management, and visual and audible alarms for “would-be criminals.”


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Straits Times

When Cao Fuhang returns to school today, the Beijing resident will first need to have his face scanned by a facial recognition software, then produce his mobile health code before he is allowed to enter the compound.


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As the world begins to reopen after battling the COVID-19 crisis, people are becoming more conscious about privacy. Tan Dawn Wei analyses the new face scanning technologies being used by schools in Beijing.

Macau Business

The Government of Macau today (Wednesday) promised to reinforce its commitment to video surveillance and to a controversial facial recognition system in the coming years, claiming that the strategy helped solve a large number of crimes.


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Forbes

A few weeks back I logged into our learning management system and noticed a new option in the sidebar, something called ProctorU. I didn’t pay much attention to it. I figured (correctly) from the name that it was some sort of test proctoring application. Neither of my courses have traditional exams this semester.


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