#16
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  • Recognising masked faces (#1)
  • AI in job hiring process? (#11)
  • Anaheim police set to use (#5)
  • TikTok faces lawsuit (#8)


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Wired

Makers of facial-recognition technology scramble to adapt to a world where people routinely cover their faces to avoid spreading disease.


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Facial recognition technology has come a long way in recent years, but one of the big issues in recent weeks, for obvious reasons, has been whether it can it detect masked faces. Tom Simonite finds out the answers in this detailed piece for WIRED.

Boston.com

Boston isn’t currently using facial recognition technology. And the city council is looking to keep it that way for the foreseeable future.


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STAT News

The long-simmering debate over facial recognition technology is taking on new urgency during the pandemic, as companies rush to pitch face-scanning systems to track the movements of Covid-19 patients.


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Analytics India Magazine

Surgical masks have transitioned from playing the role of protective equipment to being a societal norm to becoming a fashion statement within a couple of months due to COVID-19.


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The Orange County Register

Anaheim city officials have given approval to the police department to purchase facial recognition software that aids them in identifying criminal suspects.


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Nextgov

A facial recognition startup that recently spurred concerns about privacy and anonymity in America for supplying biometric surveillance tools to law enforcement is now reportedly marketing its technology to the government as a COVID-19 tracking tool—and for that, it’s caught the attention of one Democratic lawmaker.


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Biometric Update

Biometric facial recognition with thermal detection systems continue to be rolled out by the industry to meet the expected requirements for reopening businesses around the world. Mask detection is being added to face biometrics systems, and algorithms are being update to perform identification of faces occluded by masks. But how well do they work? The question remains open, even as business and governments scramble to put systems in place to reopen the global economy without inadvertently causing a second wave of death and lockdowns.


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Face biometrics have long been touted as a replacement for fingerprints and other forms of validation. However, the technology’s effectiveness is yet to be proven, as Chris Burt reports.

Reuters

TikTok Inc has been hit with a proposed class action in federal court in California accusing the social media platform of collecting and storing users’ biometric data without their consent in violation of an Illinois biometric privacy law.


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Tech Dirt

Given all we know about facial recognition tech, it is literally jaw-dropping that anyone could make this claim… especially without being vetted independently.


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The Telegraph (UK)

Forgive me if I do not entirely share the enthusiasm for downloading an app to my mobile phone that will potentially let the state track and trace my movements. While I will probably consider it a civic duty to do so in the current crisis, it is hard to believe it is even necessary to voice scepticism.


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Bloomberg Law

Whether employers are currently operating as normal, teleworking, or planning for the future, the Covid-19 experience may lead them to turn to the proliferation of workplace artificial intelligence (AI) tools to help streamline recruiting and hiring so they can continue maintaining social distancing best practices.


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Electronic Frontier Foundation

As governments search in vain for a technological silver bullet that will contain COVID-19 and allow people to safely leave their homes, officials are increasingly turning to drones. Some have floated using them to enforce social distancing, break up or monitor places where gatherings of people are occurring, identify infected people with supposed “fever detecting” thermal imaging, or even assist in contact tracing by way of face recognition and mass surveillance.


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Venture Beat

Like the rest of the world, Canadian drone maker Draganfly has been anxiously watching the spread of the novel coronavirus. And when COVID-19 cases started springing up across Washington nursing homes in mid-February, the team began brainstorming. By March, Draganfly had licensed the machine vision and AI tech needed to offer social distancing and health monitoring services from the air.


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The Guardian

Tech firms are in talks with ministers about creating health passports to help Britons return safely to work using coronavirus testing and facial recognition.


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The UK government is planning to issue health passports to its citizens. But in addition to the other attention facial recognition has gotten recently, these passports are also likely to use the technology, Kate Proctor and Hannah Devlin report.

Diginomica

The debate around the privacy implications of facial recognition tech isn’t getting any less complex.


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CPO Magazine

The use of ‘pandemic drones’ to enforce social distancing in the suburban town of Westport, Connecticut, has raised concerns over possible privacy violations.


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Biometric Update

In the midst of a series of announcements about biometric facial recognition systems being upgraded to detect if people are wearing masks, Trueface has taken the step of explaining not just that its technology has added this capacity, but how.


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Cognitive Neuroscience Society

A common view of human emotions is that they are too idiosyncratic and subjective to be studied scientifically. But as is being presented at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) virtual meeting today, cognitive neuroscientists are using contemporary, data-driven computational methods to overturn old ideas about the structure of emotions across humanity.


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CNN

For most of this year, China has been living seven weeks in the future.


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National Interest

In an effort to lessen the burden on the nation’s medical system, Japan is now using more than 10,000 hotel rooms to accommodate patients with lighter COVID-19 symptoms, in which hospitalization is not needed. And that’s not all.


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ABC News (Australia)

If you don’t feel comfortable signing up to the Government’s COVIDSafe tracking app, then you probably won’t be happy to hear about the pandemic drone.


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Japan Times

Contactless technologies have come into the spotlight amid the spread of the new coronavirus as people have become more conscious of the risks of infection from touching doorknobs and buttons.


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NJ.com

Should the police be able to monitor what you’re doing in your backyard? City of Elizabeth officials think so. The police department is using drones to watch residents and broadcast warnings to those suspected of not following social distancing guidelines. The drones surveil areas that are not easy for officers to patrol with cars: parks, alleys, and yards behind houses.


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Biometric Update

A joint advisory has been issued by authorities in the U.S. and UK about advanced persistent threat (APT) groups carrying out cyberattacks on healthcare and essential services organizations, including password spraying.


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CPO Magazine

Clearview is a facial recognition search engine licensed to law enforcement agencies by Clearview AI, Inc. that permits an investigating officer to upload a photo of an individual of interest (a possible suspect, witness or victim) and search a database compiled by Clearview of over 3 billion publicly available images posted by individuals and organizations on the web. According to the company Clearview employs state of the art facial recognition technology to try to match the image uploaded by law enforcement to Clearview’s database to try to find a match, and if a likely match is found the program displays the publicly available image located along with its associated public link. Clearview refers to its system as being like a ‘Google search for faces.’


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