#17
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  • UK police adopting recognition (#1)
  • Pandemic in Central Asia (#12)
  • Gov biometrics in Amazon cloud (#2)
  • On the Paris Metro (#17)


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Verdict

A freedom of information (FOI) request has found that UK police forces are largely adopting artificial intelligence (AI) technologies, in particular facial recognition and predictive policing, without any public consultation despite previous assurances that this would take place.


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NextGov

The Office of Biometric Identity Management released a privacy impact assessment as the program begins moving the nation’s biometric database to Amazon’s GovCloud.


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RNZ

Minister of Justice Andrew Little says police failed to get any of the necessary clearance before trialling controversial facial recognition software.


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A police trial of facial recognition technology in New Zealand has led to a major controversy in the country. Mackenzie Smith reports about increasing calls for scrutinizing the technology before using it on a large scale.

The Telegraph (UK)

A British biometrics company has developed new facial recognition technology that can identify someone even if they are wearing a mask.


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New Indian Express

HYDERABAD: The Telangana police’s new artificial intelligence-based surveillance system, which detects people who do not wear masks, has drawn flak. The AI-based face mask violation enforcement uses computer vision and deep-learning technique on CCTV cameras.Privacy activists called for the move to be rolled back or more transparency be brought into the process.


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Tech Dirt

This is the first good news we’ve heard from Clearview since its exposure by Kashmir Hill for the New York Times back in January. In response to a lawsuit filed against it in Illinois accusing it of breaking that state’s privacy laws with its scraping of images and personal info from a multitude of social media platforms, Clearview has announced it’s cutting off some of its revenue stream.


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New York Times

Bob Grewal recently began testing a new health-screening setup for workers at a Subway restaurant he owns in Los Angeles near the University of Southern California.


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CNet

App developers are creating tools to monitor people when they shop and work, despite lacking proof that it works or has safeguards to protect your data.


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Could the ongoing COVID crisis result in permanent changes to surveillance and privacy norms? Alfred Ng argues that increased monitoring needs to be handled with caution.

MIT Sloan Management Review

Artificial intelligence has a bad rap. Facial recognition algorithms — like those used by law enforcement agencies around the country — encourage racism. Digital assistants, such as Siri and Alexa, make children ruder. Predictive algorithms, like those employed by Facebook, narrow our perspectives.


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New York Times

JERUSALEM — The Israeli Defense Ministry’s research-and-development arm is best known for pioneering cutting-edge ways to kill people and blow things up, with stealth tanks and sniper drones among its more lethal recent projects.


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PYMNTS

Consumers are conflicted about dining out these days, a fact quickly confirmed by PYMNTS most recent consumer survey.


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The Diplomat

Regional governments are retooling surveillance systems in their “smart” cities to fight the pandemic, heighteing existing concerns of rights and privacy.


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Biometric Update

Zwipe CEO André Løvestam discussed how recent developments, including the global push to raise transaction limits, have affected the march towards commercializing biometric payment cards in an interview with investment analyst Redeye.


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The Intercept

For a few fleeting moments during New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s daily coronavirus briefing on Wednesday, the somber grimace that has filled our screens for weeks was briefly replaced by something resembling a smile.


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Live Mint

Employees of private firms who want to step out of their homes and resume work from offices will likely have to contend with many more social distancing technologies than the government’s mandated Aarogya Setu.


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CNet

Passwords suck. They’re hard to remember, hackers exploit their weaknesses and fixes often bring their own problems.


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Bloomberg

Despite the famous French aversion to surveillance, the coronavirus pandemic has spurred France to integrate artificial intelligence tools into CCTV cameras in the Paris Metro.


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Chatelet-Les-Halles in Paris is one of the busiest stations in the world with 33 million passengers per year. Here Bloomberg reports on a test of CCTV in the French capital.

Security Boulevard

As the world becomes more digitally bound and workers adapt to new business models, our cyber habits should improve considerably. Unfortunately, this hasn’t been the case. The 2020 LastPass ‘Psychology of Passwords’ report has revealed alarming online behavior by consumers.


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New Scientist

As countries around the world are gradually re-opening following lockdowns, government authorities are using surveillance drones in an attempt to enforce social distancing rules.


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Times Now News

China’s use of emerging technologies against the COVID-19 outbreak in the country will prove to be an important case study in crisis response over the years to come.


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Japan Times

After succeeding in suppressing the spread of COVID-19 in Wuhan, the original epicenter of the novel coronavirus, China emerged as a global leader in the fight against the pandemic, lending help to countries that subsequently struggled in their efforts to contain the pandemic, including Italy and Spain.


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Tech Republic

Salesforce recently launched the new site to help companies safely open their doors and reinvent their day-to-day operational models as the coronavirus continues to spread.


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Biometric Update

In a heavyweight addition to the increasingly-crowded market for fever detection and biometric facial recognition technology, NEC has launched NeoFace Thermal Express to provide touchless screening. The new offering combines elevated body temperature (EBT) detection, detection of personal protective equipment, such as face masks, and NeoFace biometrics on a scalable and modular platform with video and thermal analytics.


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Business Travel News

Airports are considering how to prepare for a post-Covid-19 air travel environment in order to protect and reassure a public wary of flying.


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Biometric Update

The top news of the week in biometrics and digital ID is largely divided between positive financial forecasts, results and announcements, and the technologies being developed to play a role in the global pandemic response, as well as the concerns that they raise. Relatively untested facial recognition technologies that should work in theory, and one that raised hackles and doubts across the industry also drew widespread attention.


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