#18
single distill image banner

  • Reuniting families (#6)
  • London backs off (#11)
  • EU group calls for ban (#7)
  • Fallout in NZ (#23)


Selection and ranking powered by

deepnews logo


Story Source
CNet

Researchers are crawling the internet for photos of people wearing face masks to improve facial recognition algorithms.


Editor’s Note:


If you think that masked selfies offer protection against facial recognition, then think again. These selfies are actually training the next facial recognition tool, Alfred Ng of CNet reports.

Euronews

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, many states have turned to facial recognition technology as a way to combat the spread of the virus by tracking quarantine evaders or gauging elevated temperatures of potentially infected individuals in crowds. However, without proper regulation, we have started to witness the often undetected spread of this technology, much like a virus taking over a host body. This begs the question as to what will happen when we emerge into the post-coronavirus world? Will these often invasive technological powers be de-escalated when the threat has passed? Or will they be held in place under the pretence of public protection?


Editor’s Note:


Radio Free Europe

Beijing and Moscow are being pushed together by the coronavirus pandemic in what could lead to a deepening partnership on next-generation technologies, a development that could greatly affect Eurasia.


Editor’s Note:


South China Morning Post

Officials say the move is expected to increase efficiency and reduce errors from filling out paperwork.


Editor’s Note:


Electronic Frontier Foundation

Governments around the world are using surveillance technologies to monitor whether COVID-19 patients are complying with instructions to quarantine at home. These include GPS ankle shackles, phone apps that track location, and phone apps that require patients to periodically take quarantine selfies and send them to government monitors.


Editor’s Note:


CNN

A man who was abducted as a toddler 32 years ago was finally reunited with his biological parents Monday, with the help of facial recognition technology.


Editor’s Note:


Biometric Update

European Digital Rights (EDRi) has published a paper demanding the European Commission and EU Member States institute a ban on biometric mass surveillance.


Editor’s Note:


The Independent (Zimbabwe)

On May 4, 2020, Technomag, an online magazine, published an article stating that plans to install surveillance cameras in Harare were at an advanced stage.


Editor’s Note:


Forbes

When the world economy reopens and populations want to traverse borders again, some governments are going to want proof people aren’t coming in or leaving with Covid-19. Employers are also going to want to know their workforce isn’t going to be the epicenter of another outbreak. And so a handful of companies are bidding for business that will help the Trump and Johnson administrations on either side of the Atlantic keep tabs on travel (or attempted travel) of the infected.


Editor’s Note:


Morgan Lewis

As businesses across America begin to reopen in the wake of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, many will likely implement new social distancing and sanitization procedures. That got us thinking about how companies may choose to use touchless authorization technologies like facial recognition as the main form of entry into their facilities, rather than continuing to use tools such as keypads or fingerprint scanners that require many people to repeatedly touch the same surfaces daily.


Editor’s Note:


Should all firms consider implementing some form of facial recognition in the post-COVID era? This blog post from Morgan Lewis suggests that the technology could become extremely important but surrounded by legal requirements.

ZDNet

Facial recognition tech needs immediate regulation, says privacy watchdog.


Editor’s Note:


Independent (UK)

Uber will require its drivers to wear face masks as journeys start out of coronavirus lockdowns – and will use new technology to confirm that they are complying.


Editor’s Note:


Washington Post

Melina Basnight looks into the camera and applies two shades of eyeshadow: a periwinkle blue, and a bright, bold ochre. It’s like any other tutorial on her YouTube channel, Makeup Menaree, except that it’s based on a new premise: that all points south of the eyes will be eclipsed by a mask.


Editor’s Note:


Security Boulevard

While some of the impacts of the current global pandemic could be predicted, such as the move to work from home, cloud computing, and other technological change, one of the changes that one might not consider until in the thick of the pandemic would be biometrics.


Editor’s Note:


Digital Trends

As COVID-19 lockdowns begin to lift, life in public spaces will look a little different. Masks and maintaining six feet of distance could become the new normal. And a little camera in the corner could trigger an alert if you don’t wear a mask or step too close.


Editor’s Note:


Foreign Policy

ST. PETERSBURG – On Sunday, Russia became the country with the second-highest number of official coronavirus infections in the world, after the United States.


Editor’s Note:


Readers of this newsletter will know that Russia has stepped up its facial recognition in recent weeks. Josh Nadeau reports about the latest developments, as well as how they play into the larger political scene in Moscow.

Moneycontrol

Few months from now, your attendance will be marked by facial recognition system or by voice. In airports, you will print your boarding pass through gestures.


Editor’s Note:


Biometric Update

Biometric payment cards are expected to play a major role in a trend towards the use of multi-factor contactless transactions in the aftermath of COVID-19, ABI Research forecasts based on new research.


Editor’s Note:


PYMNTS.com

Estate planning has historically meant knocking on an attorney’s door and filling out paperwork. Laws requiring consumers to have in-person meetings and submit physical ID documents have kept this antiquated system intact even as lawyers adopt software to manage their cases.


Editor’s Note:


KRAsia

Boasting clients like Bank of China and Shanghai Pudong Airport, CloudWalk secured fresh funding from state-backed funds.


Editor’s Note:


Truthout

Last week’s viral images of New York City Police Department (NYPD) officers handing out masks to crowds of white park-goers while violently attacking and arresting several Black and Latino residents for not properly distancing themselves has sparked widespread outrage.


Editor’s Note:


Tech Crunch

The COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in a wave of Chinese companies with manufacturing operations to produce virus-fighting equipment: Shenzhen-based electric vehicle giant BYD quickly moved to launch what it claims to be the world’s largest mask plant; Hangzhou-based voice intelligence startup Rokid is making thermal imaging glasses targeted at the US market; and many more


Editor’s Note:


RNZ

The Police Commissioner has ordered a stocktake of surveillance technologies after police trialed controversial facial recognition software without consulting his office.


Editor’s Note:


Biometric Update

The U.S. Government Accountability Office has issued the first in a pair of reports sketching the digital forensic tools, including biometric systems, that federal law enforcement agencies are using or experimenting with.


Editor’s Note:


Find Biometrics

Aratek has become the latest biometric specialist to add temperature detection to its portfolio. The company has integrated a fever detection system into its new BA8200-T facial recognition terminal, allowing organizations to watch for people who may be infected with the coronavirus.


Editor’s Note:



($) = This source has a hard paywall. You will need to suscribe to view this article.