#19
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  • Aussies not fussed (#3)
  • Japan’s touchless economy (#18)
  • Trials in Indonesia (#4)
  • China privacy law (#24)


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Federal Computer Weekly

A new Privacy Impact Assessment details how the Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency uses facial recognition and what protections it plans to put in place to prevent abuse.


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Wall Street Journal ($)

A Microsoft-backed bill to regulate the technology mirrors law in Washington state.


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Local legislatures are starting to put regulations in place on facial recognition, though they are not always to the liking of all those involved. Here David Uberti reports that a group of activists in California are trying to thwart a bill that they say doesn’t protect privacy.

The Age (Australia)

Most Australians are comfortable with the rise of facial recognition software despite concerns about the risks, according to the first-ever national survey on community attitudes to the technology.


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The Jakarta Post

The government has tried out a facial recognition verification system to make it easier for recipients to claim social assistance.


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Medianama

Bengaluru-based Cocoslabs Innovations will receive a loan from the Technology Development Board, under Science and Technology Department, to develop a “low-cost solution to identify persons with abnormal body temperature in a crowd and, at the same time, provide an alert system to notify about identified persons to authorities on their phones and laptops”. The product, according to TDB, includes features such as detecting and tracking a person with and without a face mask, predicting age, gender, race, temperature readings, and facial recognition in a single product that can track multiple people in a real-time environment.


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The New Yorker

In January, a Swedish entrepreneur named Joakim Hultin co-founded Sidehide, a new digital app intended to streamline hotel reservations. Weeks later, some of the first confirmed cases of COVID-19 were reported in Europe. Almost instantly, Hultin told me, “demand stopped.” Before the pandemic, Sidehide was working with a London-based company called Onfido, which uses artificial intelligence and facial recognition to verify identities.


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SurfShark

In total, there are now 109 countries today that are either using or have approved the use of facial recognition technology for surveillance purposes. But at what cost? The spread of this technology around the world has raised important questions about the impacts on privacy of such widespread surveillance.


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Quartz

Indian IT is slowly — and nervously — returning to the office.


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DataQuest India

Facial recognition is a technology that grows stronger every day. In fact, today it is part of a large percentage of our daily life when we interact with it through actions as simple as unlocking a cell phone. In countries such as China, for example, its application is massive in cities, reaching the point of being a requirement for procedures such as registering a cell phone SIM card.


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Security Boulevard

Last month, a video from a smart doorbell of a delivery man doing a quick hopscotch after dropping off the package went viral. The ease with which it was shared as a lighthearted clip meant to make us smile shows just how normal we see surveillance as part of our daily lives – whether we’re boarding an airplane, shopping or even stopping by someone’s front door.


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The ongoing COVID crisis has changed the business practices of almost all industries. In this article, Vaporstream wonders whether the pandemic has made us more aware of the dangers of facial recognition and changed the industry for good.

New Indian Express

HYDERABAD: Although it is proving to be a challenge to identify people who wear masks using facial recognition cameras, the police said it has not been impossible and that other parameters have been helping them in identifying people.


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The Verge

A group of Thomson Reuters shareholders says the company’s technology databases are being used by Immigration and Customs Enforcement to “track and arrest immigrants on a massive scale,” potentially causing reputational damage to the company.


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Biometric Update

While much of the world’s business is disrupted, biometrics providers are attempting to help enable remote work and transactions. The pandemic may have disrupted biometrics companies themselves, but it has not prevented them from getting things done, as Goode Intelligence CEO and Chief Analyst Alan Goode told Biometric Update in an interview.


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Express Computer

“Survival instinct” can now be witnessed in every human being that resides in a country affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. On a regular day, a human being would venture out in the streets and interact with fellow beings to stay connected. However, people are now moving around in masks and ensuring social distancing as a measure to survive a virus that has no cure found yet.


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The Conversation

During the frenzy of the past few months to secure resources for the fight against COVID-19, the demand for technologies that promise to detect symptomatic individuals has been sky-high. However, not all proposed solutions work as advertised.


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Reuters

SEOUL – When a man in Seoul tested positive for the new coronavirus in May, South Korean authorities were able to confirm his wide-ranging movements in and outside the city in minutes, including five bars and clubs he visited on a recent night out.


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Al Jazeera

The use of tech-based surveillance to fight the virus can exacerbate the suffering of the most vulnerable communities.


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The National (UAE)

Companies are speeding up development of products that recognise faces and hand signals.


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Japanese companies are taking the lead when it comes to the implementation of touchless technologies. Here Lu-Hai Liang reports about new products that recognize faces and signals such as using movements to select your floor in an elevator.

Security Boulevard

In the digital era, the need for security is higher than ever before as a majority of us keep a huge portion of our lives on our mobile devices. As a result, mobile phone and tech developers have integrated biometric technology within these devices to prevent theft and keep our belongings safe. In this article, we will be looking into some of the ways that this technology has revolutionized our everyday lives.


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Biometric Update

CyberLink will integrate its FaceMe Security biometric facial recognition with leading server solutions provider ASA Computers’ technology under a newly-formed partnership, and also with Advantech’s new FaceView industrial app through a separate partnership.


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The Hindu

The first step to causing a revolution in science is to smell out an anomaly, notes Professor Vilayanur S. Ramachandran.


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IT Pro Portal

According to a recent report by Blueshift, over three quarters (81 per cent) of marketers using AI and machine-based learning for personalisation are exceeding revenue goals by at least 30 per cent. However, it’s well documented that gender biases are ingrained into AI tools – as demonstrated by researchers at Bath University – so businesses need to have the right practices in place in order to succeed in using it.


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New York Times

As the country reopens, employers are looking to symptom-checking apps and fever-screening cameras to keep sick workers at home and hinder the virus. But do they violate privacy?


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Telecoms.com

China’s parliament has said it will legislate on privacy protection, while the state has vastly increased surveillance since the outbreak of COVID-19.


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Digital Journal

The developer of facial recognition technology, iProov, is working with the U.K. National Health Service (NHS) to implement biometrics in order to boost security and reduce cybersecurity incidents.


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