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  • Facial recognition panic on the streets of London
  • Biometrics and security at the Super Bowl
  • National Data Privacy Day
  • Clearview AI fallout
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Indian Express
Digi Yatra, the national digital traveler system wants to bring in a system where someone’s face would suffice as the boarding pass itself. Here’s what this facial recognition system wants to achieve at airports.

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Biometric Update
Past Super Bowls have relied on helicopters, police dogs and dozens of security agencies to ensure public safety. These kinds of security measures are top-notch and undoubtedly serve as powerful deterrents to would-be bad actors. However, these tactics have a serious blind spot: They’re unable to keep known bad actors from entering the stadium — and that’s where biometrics can change the game.

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Business Insider ($)
Deliver Fund will use XIX’s platform while working with law enforcement agencies in the upcoming Super Bowl weekend in Miami. The Super Bowl typically leads to an uptick in sex trafficking activity in the city where it is to be held, creating opportunities for law enforcers to identify them.

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AP
London police will start using facial recognition cameras to pick out suspects from street crowds in real time, in a major advance for the controversial technology that raises worries about automated surveillance and erosion of privacy rights.

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Wired
Sixty years ago, a sharecropper’s son invented a technology to identify faces. Then the record of his role all but vanished. Who was Woody Bledsoe, and who was he working for?

Editor’s Note: Alan Turing may get the credit as father of AI, but how many people know about Woody Bledsoe? Wired looks at the history of facial recognition here.

CNET
The facial recognition industry is starting to see that its promises offer a false sense of security.

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The Hill
The Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB), an independent agency, is coming under increasing pressure to recommend the federal government stop using facial recognition.

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Security Boulevard
On National Data Privacy Day, we find little has changed in what numerous privacy advocates and experts have called “the golden age of surveillance.”

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Federal Computer Week
The concern for privacy has grown over the years and today we are bombarded with every online service imaginable informing us of their ever-changing privacy policies. Such statements are often long and difficult to comprehend. When I ask my university students where privacy is guaranteed in the Constitution, I get many guesses — but ultimately, they learn the answer is nowhere — at least not directly. The closest issue to privacy in the early years of our nation was property. How things have evolved!

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Medianama
India’s National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) has extended the deadline to submit bids for the Automated Facial Recognition System (AFRS) to March 27, 2020, due to “administrative reasons.” The bids would be opened on March 30. This is the sixth time that the deadline for submitting bids has been extended, with the previous deadline being January 31, 2020.

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BBC
Police involvement in a private landlord’s facial recognition trial has led a regulator to call for government intervention. BBC Radio 4’s File on 4 has learned that South Yorkshire Police shared three photos of serious offenders and one of a vulnerable missing person with Sheffield’s Meadowhall shopping centre.

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Ars Technica
Tech from NEC aimed at spotting wanted persons on the streets to alert officers.

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GCN
An algorithm developed by the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (DC Water) with IT firm Wipro helps sewer pipe technicians get a consistent and more-accurate view of what’s happening in the network running under the nation’s capital.

Editor’s Note: The image recognition technology for faces can also be used for other things. This article includes the quote “It’s basically facial recognition … for sewer pipes.”

CBC
Each of the four privacy commissioners in Atlantic Canada have questioned their own provincial government regarding the use of facial recognition technology to prevent identity theft in the issuance of driver’s licences in the region.

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Gizmodo
An organized campaign against the use of biometric surveillance at universities and colleges in the U.S. is ratcheting up pressure on institutions it believes are currently using — or are likely soon to adopt — face recognition technology.

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Computing.co.uk ($)
The Metropolitan Police is to roll-out live facial recognition technology at “specific locations” across London. The Met claims that it will be used to “help tackle serious crime, including serious violence, gun and knife crime, child sexual exploitation” and to “help protect the vulnerable”.

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Mashable
New Jersey is ahead of the curve — at least when it comes to stopping its law enforcement from using the creepy and potentially biased facial-recognition app Clearview AI.

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CBC
‘I don’t think more cameras mean more safety,’ says Chris Gilliard

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Reuters
BRUSSELS – The European Union has scrapped the possibility of a ban on facial recognition technology in public spaces, according to the latest proposals seen by Reuters.

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Times of India
KOMPALLY: It took just three minutes for D Dharani, a final-year BCom student, to cast her vote and leave the polling booth. What helped her finish the process of exercising her franchise within minutes was the facial recognition technology.

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Time
The Metropolitan Police, the U.K.’s biggest police department with jurisdiction over most of London, announced Friday it would begin rolling out new “live facial recognition” cameras in London, making the capital one of the largest cities in the West to adopt the controversial technology.

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Coda Story
It’s a rainy night in Deptford, a fast-gentrifying area of south-east London. Sheltering from the drizzle in the lobby of a theatre, I find a group of young people daubing blue, black and red paint on their faces in strange, geometric shapes.

Editor’s Note: The big facial recognition news this past week may be the decision by London police to roll out the technology in the U.K. capital. Here Coda Story looks at the “Dazzle Club’s” feelings on the matter.

Venture Beat
On Sunday, the Financial Times published an op-ed penned by Sundar Pichai titled “Why Google thinks we need to regulate AI.” Whether he wrote it himself or merely signed off on it, Pichai clearly wants the world to know that as the CEO of Alphabet and Google, he believes AI is too important not to be regulated. He has concerns about the potential negative consequences of AI, and like any technology, he believes there needs to be some ground rules.

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The New York Post
Rogue NYPD officers are using a sketchy facial recognition software on their personal phones that the department’s own facial recognition unit doesn’t want to touch because of concerns about security and potential for abuse, The Post has learned.

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Biometric Update
Facebook Inc. executives have said they will pay $550 million to settle accusations that the social-media icon stole and then used subscribers’ biometric data — specifically, face geometries. It is being called the largest privacy-related settlement to date.

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