#20
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  • Minneapolis police (#1)
  • Clearview claims immunity (#13)
  • Matching lawmakers’ faces (#4)
  • In schools in Malaysia (#23)


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BuzzFeed

The Minneapolis Police Department has a wide breadth of surveillance technologies that could be used to monitor and target protesters — including controversial facial recognition software Clearview AI, license plate readers, body cameras, and video analysis tools.


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Coda Story

Across Europe, leaders have been desperately seeking new ways to secure borders. Concerns over migration have contributed to the evolution of new forms of authoritarian technology.


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Medium

I have looked into facial recognition for consumers, and the results are impressive. What used to be in the domain of fiction or only accessible to law-enforcement has now fully entered the consumer domain.


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Comparitech

In July 2018, the American Civil Liberties Union conducted a test using Amazon’s face recognition tool, “Rekognition”, to match photos of US Congress members against mugshots of people arrested for a crime. The ACLU found 28 false matches, highlighting the shortcomings of face recognition technology that’s being peddled to law enforcement agencies nationwide.


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One way to test facial recognition is with famous faces. Here Paul Bischoff of Comparitech replicates a study previously done by the ACLU on Amazon’s Rekognition.

Associated Press

CHICAGO – Chicago police is no longer using facial recognition software developed by a firm that was sued by a civil rights organization this week over privacy concerns.


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The New Republic

Don’t trust anyone who gets rich during a pandemic. Jeff Bezos, whose world-straddling fortune was built largely on the backs of immiserated warehouse workers around the planet, has seen his net worth increase to over $140 billion since the beginning of 2020. The nominal cause is a growing societal dependence on Amazon, which, for many people stuck at home, has proven nearly indispensable as a way to score everything from basic foodstuffs to the soothing narcotic of streaming video.


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Biometric Update

The UK government’s independent expert committee on AI and data-driven technology says it expects an appropriate degree of transparency from law enforcement in the country on its use of facial biometrics, according to a new report.


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The Telegraph (UK)

Amazon’s widely sold facial recognition technology is ‘robust’ enough to counter face masks, but Apple’s technology falls short of the mark.


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Associated Press

The metal detectors every sports fan has become accustomed to at the gate might soon be accompanied by thermal body scanners as part of the gargantuan task of preventing the spread of the new coronavirus and other airborne diseases.


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GeekWire

RealNetworks is releasing a browser extension that automatically identifies celebrities and other public figures in YouTube and Netflix videos, using the same facial recognition technology that the company originally developed for use with live surveillance video at schools, casinos and airports.


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Reuters

MILAN/NEW YORK: Chaotic demonstrations over race and policing that swept through the United States over the past week have fuelled a debate over the growing use of surveillance technology by security forces in protests worldwide and its impact on privacy.


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New York Times

The facial recognition start-up violated the privacy of Illinois residents by collecting their images without their consent, the civil liberties group says in a new lawsuit.


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Tech Dirt

Clearview is currently being sued by the attorney general of Vermont for violating the privacy rights of the state’s residents. As the AG’s office pointed out in its lawsuit, users of social media services agree to many things when signing up, but the use of their photos and personal information as fodder for facial recognition software sold to government agencies and a variety of private companies isn’t one of them.


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Readers of this newsletter will know about the controversy surrounding Clearview AI and if you have been following some of our other newsletters, you may have seen mention of Section 230. Here Tim Cushing discusses how it is being used for a claim of immunity.

GCN

With more people wearing masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, facial recognition developers are adapting, building datasets of images featuring masked faces to develop and train facial identification and recognition algorithms and upgrading existing solutions.


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Salon

On Sunday the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) called out Amazon for hypocrisy after Amazon posted a corporate show of support.


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Times of India

PATIALA: Leveraging technology in their combat against crime, the Patiala police on Saturday used a high-end facial recognition tool to nab two wanted criminals who had been eluding arrests.


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Biometric Update

From facial recognition scans that open our smartphones to medical wearables monitoring our heartrates, biometrics technologies have become a near inescapable part of our daily lives. But while these technologies continue to expand around the world, few countries have yet applied them broadly as part of their public infrastructure.


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Vox

On Friday, a Predator surveillance drone operated by United States Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) diverted from its normal route along the Canadian border in order to circle the skies over Minneapolis.


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Associated Press

The metal detectors every sports fan has become accustomed to at the gate might soon be accompanied by thermal body scanners as part of the gargantuan task of preventing the spread of the new coronavirus and other airborne diseases. And that might be just one thing the public will need to be comfortable with in order to bring games back for in-person viewing.


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The Verge

As protestors square off against police across the country, California is readying a bill that could expand the state’s use of facial recognition, including for law enforcement purposes.


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New York Times

They’re requiring masks, taking temperatures and speeding check-ins. But as one travel expert put it, “So much is uncertain right now.”


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NBC News

After Amazon said “the brutal treatment of Black people in our country must stop,” the American Civil Liberties Union replied, “Cool tweet. Will you commit to stop selling face recognition technology that supercharges police abuse?”


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The Star (Malaysia)

The usage of electronic payment systems in school gives parents a clear record of their children’s purchases.


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You may remember last year when a school in Sweden’s use of facial recognition lead to a data privacy fine. This year, after COVID, schools are becoming one of the places where facial recognition will appear more and more. This piece covers what is happening in Malaysia, including parents having access to data.

IT News (Australia)

The Digital Transformation Agency has completed a month-long pilot of the federal government’s new digital identity credential on the myGov online services portal.


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Tech Dirt

Privacy laws can have a lot of moving pieces from notices and disclosures, opt-in and opt-out consent requirements to privacy defaults and user controls. Over the past few years, there has been significant progress on these issues because privacy advocates, consumer groups, industry voices, and even lawmakers have been willing to dive into definitional weeds, put options on the table, and find middle ground.


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