#21
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  • Amazon bans police use (#2)
  • Facial recognition in ATMs (#16)
  • IBM calls it quits (#7)
  • Contactless for flights (#23)


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DeepDives.in

Sex workers and gender minorities, among others, fear loss of anonymity and stigma.


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Associated Press

NEW YORK – Amazon on Wednesday banned police use of its face-recognition technology for a year, making it the latest tech giant to step back from law-enforcement use of systems that have been criticized for incorrectly identifying people with darker skin.


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This week will forever be one that shaped the way that facial recognition goes forward. Several of the pieces on the list touch on both Amazon’s move as well as IBM’s, but this piece from the AP provides a good overview of how we got to this point.

Money Control

Facial recognition, access cards and other contactless attendance systems are gaining traction.


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Biometric Update

Could a U.S. government agency modeled on the Food and Drug Administration that categorizes biometric facial recognition technologies according to how risky they are and proscribes controls accordingly meet the regulatory challenges associated with the technology?


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Politico

Clearview AI allows users to link facial images of an individual to a database of more than three billion pictures.


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OneZero (Medium)

Ever wondered where you appear on the internet? Now, a facial recognition website claims you can upload a picture of anyone and the site will find that same person’s images all around the internet.


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Associated Press

IBM is getting out of the facial recognition business, saying it’s concerned about how the technology can be used for mass surveillance and racial profiling.


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TEISS

At the start of 2020, the European Commission was seriously considering the ban of facial recognition technology in public spaces, temporarily, until the EU could properly assess the implications this technology would have on privacy regulations. This approach would have built on the EU’s GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) that established regulatory requirements on data protection and privacy in the EU and the European Economic Area (EEA) as well as the transfer of personal data beyond the EU and EEA.


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CNet

Clearview CEO Hoan Ton-That says his company’s technology can help protect children and victims of crimes, without risk of racial bias, singling out competitor Amazon’s Rekognition as failing in that regard. His criticism comes on the same day Amazon announced a one-year moratorium on the tool’s use by law enforcement, after weeks of protest against police brutality, and just days after IBM announced it’s pulling out of the facial recognition market out of concern the product could be used for profiling.


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The Verdict

IBM’s decision to no longer offer general purpose facial recognition (FR) technology comes at a time when police activity is under increased scrutiny following the anti-racist protests across the US.


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NextGov

The Justice in Policing Act contains several restrictions on the use of facial biometric technologies for federal, state and local law enforcement.


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Big moves this week come against the background of potential regulation in the U.S. on different levels of government. Here Aaron Boyd discusses the Justice in Policing Act that could have broad implications.

Reuters

Law enforcement agencies should be banned from using racially biased surveillance technology that fuels discrimination and injustice, digital and human rights groups said on Thursday, amid protests over police brutality against black Americans.


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Verdict

The protests that have sparked across the US and around the world following the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer have drawn sharp attention to the systematic racism embedded in Western society, and in particular, law enforcement. But one of the technologies being used by police amid the protests is set to exacerbate the already severe inequalities in the criminal justice system: facial recognition.


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Money Control

IBM’s stand on facial recognition and Jack Dorsey’s defense for adding fact-checking label to the US President’s tweet, fall into the larger narrative of tech majors’ take on role of technology.


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Vox

The news that IBM will no longer produce facial recognition technology might not sound huge at first. The company’s commitment to opposing this type of racially biased surveillance technology fits into a welcome trend of actions being taken after anti-police brutality protests have swept the nation.


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Computer Weekly

Spain’s CaixaBank is rolling out cash machines fitted with facial recognition technology so customers can withdraw cash without entering a PIN.


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Beyond law enforcement, the use of facial recognition technology has been steadily increasing in banking in recent years. Karl Flinders reports that CaixaBank has rolled out the technology on a large scale in Europe.

CNet

Police have an array of surveillance tools at their disposal. Here are the best ways to stay under the radar.


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ACLU

SEATTLE — Amazon today announced a one-year moratorium on its sale of face recognition technology to law enforcement. The American Civil Liberties Union two years ago revealed that the company is secretly selling this technology to police, and has since led a coalition effort calling on the company to stop fueling police abuses and civil rights violations with the sale of this technology to law enforcement.


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Vox

Our lives are on our phones, making them a likely source of evidence if police suspect you’ve committed a crime. That’s something to keep in mind as protests over the killing of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers sweep the nation. Law enforcement has a history of using civil unrest to ramp up their surveillance of the public.


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ZDNet

Singapore currently is developing a wearable device that may be issued to every resident as a way to facilitate contact tracing amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, but the move has sparked public outcry from individuals concerned about their privacy. An online petition urging the public to reject its use has, to date, garnered more than 17,500 signatures.


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Al Jazeera

Al Jazeera speaks to experts and grassroots workers on whether tech is a force for good or a tool in hands of powerful.


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FoxNews

“We never got into any of the health measurement data, that would all be phase 3,” Chell explained. “We miscalculated the reaction that people would have. It doesn’t identify people, it doesn’t use facial recognition,” he said. “When that became a concern, they [the Westport Police] swiftly said ‘we’re here to protect our public, and if there’s great concern over that, then this isn’t something that we’re going to go forward with.’”


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Flight Global

Collins Aerospace believes contactless biometrics and other hygiene-related technologies will be in high demand, as the air transport industry emerges from the coronavirus pandemic.


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Business Insider

The app lets people message, call, and share video using end-to-end encryption, meaning their communications will be kept hidden if their phones are hacked or confiscated.


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LiveMint

Social distancing has become a new normal and everybody is after using contactless products for safety.


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