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  • An EU facial recognition network?
  • Breach at Clearview AI
  • Facial recognition and smart cities
  • Ban in Portland, Ore.?
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Brookings
Last week, the European Commission (EC) released a white paper that seeks to ensure societal safeguards for “high-risk” artificial intelligence (AI). The number of large-scale and highly influential AI models is increasing in both the public and private sector, and so the EC is seriously considering where new regulations, legislative adjustments, or better oversight capacity might be necessary. These models affect millions of people through critical decisions related to credit approval, insurance claims, health interventions, pre-trial release, hiring, firing, and much more. While facial recognition, autonomous weapons, and artificial general intelligence tend to dominate the conversation, the debate on regulating more commonplace applications is equally important.

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AI Business
With Fortnite, developer Epic Games didn’t just create an internationally acclaimed game; they built a new virtual space for socializing. With the PlayStation VR, Sony released the first mass-market console that allowed us to experience high-definition virtual reality in the comfort of our living room. There are countless more examples of revolutionary changes in the gaming industry that have happened just over the past two decades. All of them point to the same conclusion: as technology grows and evolves, the gaming industry evolves with it.

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The Daily Beast
Clearview AI, which contracts with law enforcement after reportedly scraping 3 billion images from the web, now says someone got “unauthorized access” to its list of customers.

Editor’s Note: Clearview AI has popped up in the headlines again without wanting to. Here the Daily Beast first reported about a breach at the company.

CNET
A technology used in a number of prisons is tracking students now too.

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Press Association
Privacy concerns over live facial recognition are ‘much smaller’ than the need to protect the public from ‘a knife through the chest’, Britain’s most senior police officer has said.

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Tech Crunch
The law, California’s Consumer Privacy Act — or CCPA — became law on January 1, allowing state residents to reclaim their right to access and control their personal data. Inspired by Europe’s GDPR, the CCPA is the largest statewide privacy law change in a generation. The new law lets users request a copy of the data that tech companies have on them, delete the data when they no longer want a company to have it, and demand that their data isn’t sold to third parties. All of this is much to the chagrin of the tech giants, some of which had spent millions to comply with the law and have many more millions set aside to deal with the anticipated influx of consumer data access requests.

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BBC
Barclays has faced a backlash after it piloted a system that tracked the time employees spent at their desks. The company has since scrapped the system – but how common is workplace surveillance and what lengths are employers allowed to go to monitor their staff?

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The Hill
The House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday canceled a planned vote to reauthorize a set of controversial government surveillance programs over concerns that a slew of privacy-focused amendments from Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) would tank the bill in the House, sources confirmed to The Hill.

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Digital Trends
Apple’s Face ID is the gold standard in facial recognition tech, but it’s not one hundred percent foolproof. Highly detailed 3D printed masks can trick it. Less sophisticated 2D sensors, still found in many smartphones, can be tricked with a photo.

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The Conversation
Imagine you’re a fossil hunter. You spend months in the heat of Arizona digging up bones only to find that what you’ve uncovered is from a previously discovered dinosaur.

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Find Biometrics
Houston’s William P. Hobby Airport is set to launch a facial recognition system for international passengers, making it the first airport in Texas to have biometric entry and exit for international passengers.

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The Intercept
A police investigator in Spain is trying to solve a crime, but she only has an image of a suspect’s face, caught by a nearby security camera. European police have long had access to fingerprint and DNA databases throughout the 27 countries of the European Union and, in certain cases, the United States. But soon, that investigator may be able to also search a network of police face databases spanning the whole of Europe and the U.S.

Editor’s Note: Face Value discusses law enforcement a lot, though one interesting aspect is sharing data across borders. Here The Intercept discusses a leaked report about a potential network of databases across the EU.

Reuters
TORONTO – Alphabet’s (GOOGL.O) proposed “smart” city development in Toronto is facing fresh questions over the project’s data-gathering technology from a panel advising the Canadian government-mandated body in charge of getting it built.

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Bloomberg
For decades, China has been building and refining the ability to track its citizens’ whereabouts and interactions to contain dissent and protest. The state’s effort to try to contain the rapid spread of the new coronavirus is now testing the limits of that surveillance system.

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The Conversation
The UK is currently witnessing a tug of war over facial recognition. On the streets of London and in South Wales, live systems have been deployed by the police, supported by the UK government. But in the Scottish parliament, the Justice Sub-Committee on Policing is trying to halt use of the technology.

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PBS Frontline
In recent years, Amazon has faced growing criticism from civil rights groups, AI researchers and even some Amazon employees and shareholders for selling its facial recognition technology to law enforcement and discussing it with U.S. government agencies. Some of the same groups have also raised concerns that the technology could in the future be available to foreign governments, including authoritarian regimes.

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Security Boulevard
The global media and entertainment industry is undergoing a massive transformation at the moment. Interestingly, it is adapting itself to improve customer experiences like never before.

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Ars Technica
The request for documentation digs into everything about Ring’s deals with cops.

Editor’s Note: The House is interested in what is happening at houses around the country. Here Ars Technica looks into the work of the Oversight Committee in Washington.

Biometric Update
The Russian Ministry of Internal Affairs wants to install a biometric surveillance system by the end of 2021 that will identify criminals and suspects from urban surveillance networks with facial, voice, iris and even gait and tattoo recognition technology, writes RBC.ru.

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The Oregonian
It took a few moments before Eduardo Carrillo could step into a Jacksons Food Store in Northeast Portland on a recent weeknight. He stood in front of the locked gas station convenience store door, placed his feet on designated spots on a doormat and looked up into a camera. The door then unlocked.

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Associated Press
Bus drivers in Moscow kept their WhatsApp group chat buzzing with questions this week about what to do if they spotted passengers who might be from China riding with them in the Russian capital.

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Calgary Herald
A Calgary police officer says using open-sourced data such as social media with facial recognition technology is “fraught with danger.”

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Global Banking and Finance Review
The adoption of AI in surveillance is positively impacting industries across the globe, and financial institutions are no exception.

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Financial Times ($)
If leaders are serious about their state-like powers, they must treat customers as citizens

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Gizmodo
Things have swiftly turned very, very bad for e-cigarette titan Juul. The company has been targeted by health officials and regulators as being a primary driver behind a surge in kids and teens hooked on tobacco products, and Juul is now in crisis mode as it works to prevent its products from being yanked from the market. According to a new report, one way Juul might be hoping to do so is by pitching federal officials on a locked version of its e-cigarettes that would bar users younger than 21 from using them.

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