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  • The Pope and algor-ethics
  • Facial recognition and ICE
  • New tech from TSA
  • How cameras change thinking
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The New York Times
A new system uses software to dictate quarantines — and appears to send personal data to police, in a troubling precedent for automated social control.

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The Conversation
Australian police agencies are reportedly using a private, unaccountable facial recognition service that combines machine learning and wide-ranging data-gathering practices to identify members of the public from online photographs.

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Reuters
The Vatican joined forces with tech giants Microsoft and IBM on Friday to promote the ethical development of artificial intelligence (AI) and call for regulation of intrusive technologies such as facial recognition.

Editor’s Note: The Catholic Church is not famous for moving quickly, though Pope Francis has entered the discussion on facial regulation, calling specifically for regulation in a speech.

Asian Age
Chennai: Gender rights campaigns have forced tech companies developing artificial intelligence such a Google to drop gender labels in images of people, and instead use the term ‘person’. Following Google’s announcement on compliance last week, Microsoft, IBM and Amazon are now under pressure to also tweak how AI labels photos of people.

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CPO Magazine
On 19 February the European Commission presented three papers setting out no less than the digital future of the EU. So what are they exactly and why are they not laws?

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Biometric Update
A Credential Authentication Technology (CAT) system first piloted at Boston Logan Airport during the past year is now being rolled out at airports across the nation by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). though the agency is a bit behind the schedule announced in January. CAT has now been deployed at some of the security checkpoints at Sacramento International Airport (SMF).

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The Washington Post
The agency’s unlimited access to drivers’ photos has alarmed immigration and privacy activists, who fear it is being used to target immigrants who sought driver’s licenses after 2013

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The Guardian
While the new interpretation of HG Wells’s novel might lean into Hollywood silliness, its portrayal of a woman being surveilled is scarily real

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The Conversation
Facial recognition is increasingly being used in many countries around the world. In some cases the take up has been dramatic. As a result, people are being observed by cameras more than ever, whether in stores, on public transit, or at their workplaces.

Editor’s Note: The presence of cameras can change what we do, though research suggests it also changes how we think. Here Janina Steinmetz of City, University of London, explains.

Bloomberg
In the U.S., Super Tuesday established two leading candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination. If things continue the way they’re going, the Democratic party will be left with a choice between Joe Biden, who has alternately criticized and praised the tech industry, and Bernie Sanders, who incites near-panic within some Silicon Valley circles.

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Biometric Update
China’s central bank is urging payment services organizations in Beijing to introduce measures to reduce chances for coronavirus infections, including warning customers about health risks that may be associated with using facial recognition for payments, writes China Banking News.

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Security Boulevard
With more than 5,000 data breaches and over 7 billion records exposed, 2019 was the worst year on record for breach activity. According to research from Risk Based Security, the number of data breaches within just the first nine months of 2019 increased 33% over the previous year. Retailers, medical providers and public entities experienced the most data breaches due to misconfigured databases, unsecured endpoints and the accidental exposure of sensitive data on the internet.

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Medianama
The Vadodara City Police, in the Indian state of Gujarat, is planning to use Clearview AI’s controversial facial recognition software in public places such as railway stations and bus depots, and to track “property offenders”, Joint Commissioner of Vadodara City Police, KG Bhati, told MediaNama. The department had “piloted” the software “earlier this year”, Bhati said, but did not specify when, for how long, and for what purpose, or when they would start using the service. Another high-ranking official from the police department told MediaNama, on the condition of anonymity, that the software could be used in CCTVs installed at “specific locations” in the city.

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Calgary Herald
The Calgary Police Service has confirmed two of its officers had tested controversial facial-recognition software made by Clearview A.I., Postmedia has learned.

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ATM Marketplace
Legal actions against companies collecting biometric data from customers have caught the attention of companies already using biometric technology to identify customers in unattended retail environments.

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Business Insider
The Met Police announced early this year that it would start rolling out facial recognition in London despite pushback from advocacy groups.

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Meduza
In mid-February, dispatchers for the state corporation that runs Moscow’s above-ground public transport received an order to notify the police about any Chinese people using their services. City officials also told the staff of the Moscow Metro to collect data about the health of any Chinese passengers. Moscow Mayor Sergey Sobyanin even announced that the city’s newly developed video surveillance and facial recognition system had been used to monitor the movements of individuals from China living in or visiting Russia’s capital.

Editor’s Note: Coronavirus continues to play a role in the implementation of facial recognition. Moscow’s system, which Face Value readers will remember was unveiled several weeks ago, is now monitoring those placed under quarantine, Meduza reports.

Al Jazeera
Chengdu, China – Sitting at the entrance of Chengdu’s East Railway Station, Fu Guobin stared at a screen displaying infrared images of people passing through the station’s gates. As each person entered, a number popped up next to their image indicating their body temperature.

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Ars Technica
SEATTLE—For how far and wide Amazon’s digital footprint reaches, the company clearly wants to advance into real-world space as much as possible. And to that end, Amazon runs some of its most ambitious experiments in its headquarters’ city before rolling them out nationwide.

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Indian Express
A release by the DCP Zone 2, Sandeep Chaudhary stated that in the view of rumors about the city police deliberately taking down CCTV cameras in the old city area, the Vadodara city police has begun installing new state of the art security cameras.

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The Conversation
The UK is currently witnessing a tug of war over facial recognition. On the streets of London and in South Wales, live systems have been deployed by the police, supported by the UK government. But in the Scottish parliament, the Justice Sub-Committee on Policing is trying to halt use of the technology.

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CNET
Sen. Edward Markey is also concerned that Clearview AI may have violated online child privacy laws.

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Buzzfeed News
A BuzzFeed News review of Clearview AI documents has revealed the company is working with more than 2,200 law enforcement agencies, companies, and individuals around the world.

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CNET
It’s a new challenge for the controversial facial recognition startup.

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The Guardian
Students staged protests on a dozen campuses while 36 schools saw online actions

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