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Stuff
When Aaron Doody had his legal self stolen it was through the old fashioned way: thieves broke into his Wellington flat and pinched his passport.

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Venture Beat
While artificial intelligence (AI) powered technologies are now commonly appearing in many digital services we interact with on a daily basis, an often neglected truth is that few companies are actually building the underlying AI technology.

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CNet
Security keys, biometrics and a technology called FIDO are upgrading today’s feeble security foundation.

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Homeland Security Today
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) is calling on companies developing privacy-enhancing technologies to submit applications for the 2020 Privacy Technology Demonstration — a first-of-its-kind event to examine the performance of technologies intended to protect the privacy of individuals by obfuscating or encrypting faces in videos.

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The Telegraph
Britain’s decision to restrict the level of information about the spread of the coronavirus by publishing weekly rather than daily figures on new infections stands in stark contrast to the approach being pursued elsewhere.

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Silicon Angle
Three decades of male dominance in computer science has seen women fighting for equal opportunity, equal pay, and equal treatment. For most of that time, the level of discrimination was quietly swept under the carpet. Then in 2013, software engineer and diversity and inclusion advocate Tracy Chou challenged big tech to publish workplace diversity figures. The resulting statistics revealed just how much of a boys club tech really was.

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The New York Times
Investors and clients of the facial recognition start-up freely used the app on dates and at parties — and to spy on the public.

Editor’s Note: This story on Clearview AI from the Times came out just after Face Value was released last week. If you missed it, check out great insight into who had the technology in addition to the police.

Kanazawa University
A point set registration problem is a task using two shapes, each consisting of a set of points, to estimate the relationship of individual points between the two shapes. Here, a “shape” is like a human body or face, which is similar to another body or face but exhibits morphological diversity.

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One Zero (Medium)
Emails obtained by OneZero reveal the controversial company’s marketing to law enforcement

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ZDNet
The integrity of the global distributed computing network depends extensively on how well users’ digital identities can be protected. As difficult a problem as it seems, it’s actually much harder.

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CBC
They’re intrusive technologies that need to be regulated,’ Halifax lawyer says

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Venture Beat
A school in Poland has been fined €4,600 ($5,200) for breaching Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) after it was found to be processing students’ fingerprint data to verify whether they had paid for school lunch. The news comes as biometric data harnessing programs around the world spark significant privacy concerns.

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GovTech
As anxieties about foreign interference in the 2020 presidential election grow, concerns about other vectors of misinformation are evident. Deepfakes, realistic video forgeries, have some of the most damaging potential.

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Reuters
A Chinese company says it has developed the country’s first facial recognition technology that can identify people when they are wearing a mask, as most are these days because of the coronavirus, and help in the fight against the disease.

Editor’s Note: As with most stories, facial recognition has a coronavirus angle. Here Reuters reports from Beijing.

The Stranger
On Friday lawmakers in Olympia must decide between two different versions of a “groundbreaking” data privacy bill called the Washington Privacy Act.

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The Guardian
Experts say the coronavirus has given the Chinese government a pretence for accelerating the mass surveillance

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Reuters
A lack of regulation about the use of facial recognition technology at U.S. schools has alarmed education officials and lawmakers who say more research is needed before rolling it out widely.

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One Zero (Medium)
Police cam manufacturer Wolfcom has contracts with 1,500 organizations

Editor’s Note: One Zero has dedicated coverage to facial recognition, including multiple pieces on this week’s list. Here they report on another use by police, an important place where the technology is present now.

Slate
From 2013 to June 2017, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s New York Field Office determined that about 47 percent of detainees designated as “low risk” should be released while they waited for their immigration cases to be resolved, according to FOIA data obtained by the New York Civil Liberties Union. But something changed in the middle of 2017. From June 2017 to September 2019, that figure fell to 3 percent: Virtually all detainees, the data shows, had to wait weeks or even months in custody before their first hearing, even if they posed little flight risk.

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The Engineer
An expert panel discusses how technologies such as iris and facial recognition are ushering in the post-password era.

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Irish Times
We are under surveillance. Cameras are everywhere – attached to buildings, in shopping malls, on public roads and street corners – and our online behaviour is covertly monitored in detail before being fed into complex algorithms. Globally, one in three people use a Facebook-owned service on a daily basis and Google, especially now through Android, is harvesting our browsing, location and travel patterns.

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Vice
Fawkes’ may be the most advanced system yet for fooling facial recognition tech like Clearview AI — until the algorithms catch up.

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National Law Review
Key trends are emerging out of the recently proposed CCPA “copycat” legislation across the United States, and Washington State is leading the charge for stricter data privacy legislation. Businesses should closely monitor the developments in Washington and other states with proposed new privacy laws, particularly with respect to the trend of increased private rights of action.

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Financial Times ($)
Slowly but surely, surveillance technology is becoming commonplace in many schools and universities.

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Cato Institute
Clearview’s technology should concern everyone who values privacy and security.

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