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Economic Times

On February 14, an official of the Telangana government’s information and public relations team tweeted a graphic with a picture of the state’s upcoming “command and control centre”, along with a closed-circuit television (CCTV) camera. A translation of the Telugu text said thus: “In six months, the command and control building will be ready. One lakh cameras will be processed in under a minute. If you got out for work, by the time you are back 50 cameras can spot you. Every inch of the state will be under police radar. If a crime happens anywhere, there will be information immediately.”


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University of Exeter

Over-reliance by countries on artificial intelligence to tackle international migration and manage future migration crisis could lead to serious breaches of human rights, a new study warns.


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Nikkei

HONG KONG — Chinese artificial intelligence startup SenseTime Group has deferred its plan for an up to $750 million initial public offering in Hong Kong this year and instead aims to tap private markets, people briefed on the plan said, joining the list of companies scrapping share-sale plans as the novel coronavirus outbreak batters markets.


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Business Times (Singapore)

“There’s always a human actor, so we need to hold the human actors accountable. We need to hold the AI developers, the AI users accountable,” says Reed Smith’s Ms Aw.


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Biometric Update

Idemia is planning to expand its business in Egypt and establish a shared services center in the country, CEO Yan Delabrière told Egypt’s Minister of Communications and Information Technology Amr Talaat in a recent meeting. The company also agreed to work with Egypt Post to build digital identity services backed by fingerprint biometrics and citizen IDs.


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Daily Dot

With just 31 confirmed coronavirus deaths in the United States, most people do not have quarantine on their minds just yet.


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MIT Technology Review

An in-depth investigation into artificial-intelligence-based attempts to recognize deception.


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The Distill often covers law enforcement use of facial recognition, though it is more than security cameras. Here Jake Bittle does a deep dive into the use of tech in lie detector tests, where it is used to capture small facial movements.

Electronic Frontier Foundation

The government and law enforcement should not be scanning your photos with face recognition technology. But right now, at least half of Americans are likely in government face recognition databases — often thanks to secretive agreements between state and federal government agencies — without any of us having opted in. Although the majority of Americans are in these databases, it’s nearly impossible to know whether or not your photo has been included. Today, EFF is launching a new project to help fight back: Who Has Your Face.


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OneZero (Medium)

Facial recognition companies are pitching the technology as a sanitary alternative to fingerprint scanners


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GeekWire

The Washington state legislature passed a bill establishing new guardrails on government use of facial recognition software.


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The Hindu

Modern technology has dangers, but there should be hope that care and sophistication would transform investigation


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Vice

New high-resolution satellites, AIs, and data tools are going to let us study Earth, and ourselves, in greater detail than ever before. That’s going to come with “unthinkable” problems.


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Electronic Frontier Foundation

In response to an EFF campaign started last year, roughly a third of institutions that we believe requested problematic and exploitive data as part of a government automated tattoo recognition challenge deleted the data or reported that they had never received or used it.


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Recognition is not just for faces but also tattoos. Here the EFF, which has a firm stance arguing for more restrictions on facial recognition use by law enforcement, looks at responses to a campaign it launched.

South China Morning Post

Since then, there have been major advancements in AI technologies, in areas including natural language processing, speech recognition, data analytics, machine learning and deep learning, and a wide range of applications from chatbots to facial recognition. These technologies have affected all industry sectors and are now being deployed as powerful weapons against Covid-19.


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Daily Sabah

Once a wild fantasy, creating digital avatars of people is now within the realm of possibility. But will such technology have real-life applications? Here are some of the latest developments in the field of artificial intelligence


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Lawfare Blog

The Trump administration recently unveiled its budget for Fiscal Year 2021. For those with an eye toward diplomacy, it’s a grim picture: $3.7 billion cut from the Department of State and international aid programs. The budget also eliminates discretionary overseas spending by the U.S. Agency for International Development and other State Department collaborators.


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POLITICO

The Council of the EU has been advised to include photos of the Continent’s residents in a network of databases that could be searched by police using facial recognition software, according to an internal report circulated by the Austrian government and obtained by POLITICO.


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Asian Age

With their trusty sidekick in tow and intuition, Sherlock Holmes or Inspector Morse might narrow down the killer, but law enforcement agencies need more than intuition to put a criminal behind bars. From smart watches to Fitbit bands, from pacemakers to Amazon Echoes, from CCTVs to DNA scanners and coffee-makers, detectives across the world are relying more and more on hi-tech gadgets to outsmart criminals.


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The Guardian

With 850 million children worldwide shut out of schools, tech evangelists claim now is the time for AI education. But as the technology’s power grows, so too do the dangers that come with it. By Alex Beard


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This week many students and teachers are figuring out how to make the best educational experiences possible remotely. Here The Guardian digs into the role of computers in education, including monitoring faces.

Biometric Update

Motorola Solutions has upgraded the capabilities of its facial recognition video security and analytics product Avigilon Control Center (ACC) 7.6 by adding watch list controls to safeguard individual privacy rights and enforce responsible data management while addressing enterprise safety needs, the company announced.


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CNN

When it comes to smart doorbells, there are really just two companies that dominate the market: Amazon’s Ring and Google’s Nest.


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CPO Magazine

Broad government agency exemptions, large added costs are the main concern.


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Financial Times ($)

Hanwang, the facial-recognition company that has placed 2m of its cameras at entrance gates across the world, started preparing for the coronavirus in early January.


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NBC News

Georgia’s Department of Driver’s Services has shared information, including facial recognition searches, about the state’s residents with immigration authorities, according to data from an open records request.


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The Register

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is suing Uncle Sam’s Homeland Security, and multiple government agencies, claiming the g-men stonewalled on what they are doing with people’s faces scanned at US airports. The civil-rights warriors hope to extract information from the organizations via the courts.


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