#0
single distill image banner
  • Worries about future from VW CEO
  • End of Uber shareholder lawsuit
  • Tesla that speaks to pedestrians
  • And roundups of end of CES
Selection and ranking powered by deepnews logo
Story Source
Driving.ca
In between all the far-off never-going-to-happen concepts were some neat innovations from major automakers and tech companies

Editor’s Note:

The Conversation
Cars are changing – fast. But are innovations such as autonomous and flying cars a bright new dawn, or just a wild pipe dream? And if they become the future’s way of getting from A to B, can we trust them to take us there safely? Here are five key questions answered by an expert.

Editor’s Note:

Reuters
FRANKFURT — Volkswagen needs to accelerate the overhaul of its business to avoid becoming another Nokia, which lost its dominance in the handset market to Apple, the German carmaker’s chief executive said.

Editor’s Note:

The Conversation
There has already been a fair number of jobs lost to automation over recent decades – from factory workers to bank tellers. In the coming decade we might see radically larger numbers of jobs lost to automation, thanks to advances in machine learning and other technologies.

Editor’s Note:

Ars Technica
Mobileye made a self-driving car that only uses cameras — no lidar or radar.

Editor’s Note:

Driving.ca
The results of an annual global study shows what we want isn’t necessarily what automakers are planning to give us

Editor’s Note: Autonomous cars are coming, but do people want them? Driving.ca looks at the 2020 Global Automotive Consumer Study.

Ars Technica
Lidar sensors work by bouncing laser light off surrounding objects to produce a three-dimensional “point cloud.” The first modern three-dimensional lidar was created for the 2005 DARPA Grand Challenge, a pivotal self-driving car competition. Today, many experts continue to see lidar as a key enabling technology for self-driving cars.

Editor’s Note:

E&T
As the world’s largest consumer technology show winds down today in Las Vegas, we look at this year’s hot topics and headline news.

Editor’s Note:

Israel 21c
At the beginning of each new year, more than 250,000 tech enthusiasts, brands and members of the media fly to Las Vegas for the annual mega tech conference CES.

Editor’s Note:

Enterprise iot Insights
Bosch wants to be an “innovation leader” in AI, it told CES last week. The German industrial giant, one of the manufacturing sector’s most outspoken champions of industrial 5G, is seeking to mainline data in its products and factories, and apply advanced analytics to drive efficiencies in its business and environmental impact.

Editor’s Note:

AFP
In the not-too-distant future you could ride one, two or three wheels… or maybe none at all.

Editor’s Note:

Bloomberg
Diess said that VW is not fast enough in its move toward new technologies.

Editor’s Note: A couple of the articles this week deal with comments from VW’s CEO expressing worry about the future of companies like his own given changes in the industry. Here Bloomberg’s Frankfurt-based Christoph Rauwald covers it.

Reuters
Canadian auto parts maker Magna International Inc on Thursday forecast lower 2020 sales and scrapped its partnership with Lyft to co-develop self-driving technology as it said it would instead focus on developing assisted driving technology.

Editor’s Note:

Tech Radar
Sharing a video via Twitter, in which a Tesla car can be seen talking to pedestrians, Musk said the feature will be making its way to the range of electric cars “soon”.

Editor’s Note:

Reuters
WASHINGTON – The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will meet on Feb. 25 to determine the probable cause of the 2018 fatal crash of a Tesla Inc (TSLA.O) vehicle in Mountain View, California, the agency said.

Editor’s Note:

Foss Bytes
A new Tesla Model X rival is taking shape in Turkey in the form of the TOGG C-SUV. TOGG stands for Türkiye’nin Otomobili Girişim Grubu in Turkish and is the country’s first electric car company in decades.

Editor’s Note:

Mashable
In a shocking robotics experiment, which took place a few years ago, Japanese researchers let a robot loose in a mall and watched how kids reacted. One might expect, in a sense of wonder, that children would be empathetic towards the robot, but the kids proceeded to kick and punch the robot and called it all sorts of names.

Editor’s Note:

AP
DOVER, Del. — Delaware’s Supreme Court has upheld a judge’s dismissal of a shareholder lawsuit against ride-hailing company Uber and its former CEO.

Editor’s Note:

Stanford University
But Alsterda changed course after watching a self-driving coupe named Shelley zip around a racetrack at 120 mph in a video published by the Dynamic Design Lab, which is part of the Mechanical Engineering Department in Stanford’s School of Engineering.

Editor’s Note:

The Japan News (Yomiuri Shimbun)
The government plans to create a performance simulator in which the roads around the Odaiba district of Tokyo are replicated in virtual reality, part of its measures to support the development of autonomous vehicles in fiscal 2020.

Editor’s Note:

Nikkei
TAIPEI — Foxconn, the world’s biggest contract electronics manufacturer, said Thursday it will develop electric vehicles with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, as the Apple supplier seeks new growth drivers to combat the slowing smartphone industry.

Editor’s Note:

China Daily
Large-scale commercial use of self-driving technologies could become a reality sooner than expected, as tech companies are beefing up efforts to conduct passenger tests on unmanned vehicles, build out vehicle-to-everything infrastructure, and promote the application of superfast 5G technology.

Editor’s Note:

The Optical Society
Detailed, fast imaging of hidden objects could help self-driving cars detect hazards.

Editor’s Note: Seeing in front of you is nice, but what about those pesky corners. Here the Optical Society, a group for photonics and optics researchers, writes about progress.

Electrek
Tesla vehicles are apparently going to talk to people not only inside the car but also outside. CEO Elon Musk even released a quick preview video.

Editor’s Note:

Columbia Engineering
Columbia researchers use game theory to help policy makers create liability rules for accidents involving self-driving cars and those driven by people

Editor’s Note:

($) = This source has a hard paywall. You will need to suscribe to view this article.