#12
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  • Talking about ethics (#5)
  • Layoffs in LIDAR land (#15)
  • A “master inventor” (#11)
  • Mayo Clinic uses self-driving (#20)


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The New York Times

Methods that do not rely on such precise human-provided supervision, while much less explored, have been eclipsed by the success of supervised learning and its many practical applications — from self-driving cars to language translation. But supervised learning still cannot do many things that are simple even for toddlers.


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Reuters

California’s Department of Motor Vehicles on Tuesday authorized autonomous technology startup Nuro to test two driverless delivery vehicles in nine cities, a decision that comes as coronavirus concerns lock down many in the state.


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National Law Review

Taking a break from reporting on COVID-19 legal developments, we turn for a moment to what is happening now on export control of autonomous vehicle technology.


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Part of why I think self-driving cars make a good Distill is that their development is taking place around the globe. However, there are also rules about what technology can be exported where. Here Curtis M. Dombek and team explain.

The Globe and Mail ($)

They say self-driving cars are almost upon us, and for many Canadians, they can’t come soon enough. Autonomous driving (AD) is a godsend if you view driving as a necessary evil, a chore to be undertaken with the bare minimum effort necessary to arrive alive.


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NC State

If you want to understand how people are thinking (and feeling) about new technologies, it’s important to understand how media outlets are thinking (and writing) about new technologies. A recent analysis of how journalists have dealt with the ethics of artificial intelligence (AI) suggests that reporters are doing a good job of grappling with a complex set of questions – but there’s room for improvement.


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Financial Express

The North African nation Tunisia which has 436 people being treated for COVID-19, has already deployed a police robot for patrolling areas of Tunis, and ensuring the people are following the lockdown order.


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Jalopnik

Following the approval of Alphabet’s Waymo to run without a safety driver, Nuro is only the second company to be allowed totally driverless testing on California roads. Mostly because the Nuro R2 prototypes aren’t big enough to fit a driver anyhow. On Tuesday the self-driving startup was granted a permit allowing its two prototypes the ability to test in nine California cities.


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The Verge

Autonomous shuttles are being used to move COVID-19 tests from a Jacksonville, Florida testing site to a nearby Mayo Clinic processing location, in what the medical nonprofit is calling a “first” for the US. But as is often the case with autonomous vehicle pilot programs, there’s a catch: during each run made to and from the clinic, the self-driving shuttles are being trailed by an SUV driven by a human.


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Forbes

The article “Linux beat IBM will open-source software beat Waymo and Tesla ?” introduced the power of the open-source organizational model to crowdsource the innovation of a community.


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Digital Trends

Drawing a BMW isn’t as straightforward as it once was. The company’s stylists need to preserve 92 years of car-building heritage while continuing to move its design language forward, and now there’s a new challenge: adapting it to new technologies like electrification and different levels of computer-aided driving. At least 12 of the models it will launch by 2023 will be entirely electric, including a variant of the next-generation 7 Series, but batteries aren’t keeping Domagoj Dukec, the firm’s head of design, up at night. The much taller hurdle is autonomous driving.


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Austin American Statesman

IBM master inventor Rhonda Childress isn’t the type of person who sits under an apple tree and waits for the next big idea to fall on her head.


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What does it take to be a “master inventor?” Here the Statesman speaks to Rhonda Childress, who knows, about subjects including her work on self-driving cars. Warning: Readers in the EU may not be able to access this article for data compliance reasons.

Bloomberg

When DeepMind, the artificial intelligence company owned by Google parent Alphabet Inc., released its predictions about some of the building blocks of the virus that causes Covid-19 in early March, it gave medical researchers a small but potentially important clue that could help them develop a vaccine and treatments for the respiratory illness. The company’s deep learning system, AlphaFold, which predicts the shapes of proteins when no similar structures are available, is just one example of the powerful role AI is playing in the fight against the novel coronavirus.


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Clean Technica

Swedish carmaker Volvo will be splitting its autonomous driving development arm, now called Zenuity, into two separate entities in a bid to accelerate the development and implementation of its next-generation Pilot Assist self-driving system. The move will create one company, still called Zenuity, and a new company that will be absorbed by the safety equipment gurus at Veoneer.


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Jalopnik

Earlier today, Waymo, the Alphabet/Google-owned company developing autonomous ride-sharing vehicles, issued a statement saying they would be suspending all operations, including their “fully driverless operations.” Unlike most activities during the pandemic, I think perhaps this actually could be a good time for Waymo to be testing AVs. Let’s think about this.


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The Register

Employees allege offshoring was reason behind next-day sacking of 140 staff


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Business Live (South Africa)

In future you will no longer leave on daily journeys in the comfort of your own vehicle and instead you’ll hail a ride-sharing pod, probably electrically powered and driverless, to get wherever you’re going. Autonomous, connected, electric and shared (ACES) transportation concepts make for great headlines and fantastical reading, but is this really where we’re headed?


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Electrek

Tesla is aiming to release the ability for Autopilot to navigate intersections in just weeks in the US, but it will take months for other markets.


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Popular Mechnics

Focusing on a few poor human senses doesn’t account for our well-developed holistic abilities.


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Financial Express

Your future Volvo could drive all by its self on longer journeys as the Swedish brand commits to accelerating the development of autonomous driving technology.


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Mayo Clinic

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. ― For the first time in the U.S., autonomous vehicles are being used to transport medical supplies and COVID-19 tests at Mayo Clinic in Florida.


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I have been surprised by the amount of COVID news that also touches on self-driving cars. We’ve seen pieces from China, but this one comes from the U.S., where healthcare provider Mayo Clinic has taken advantage of the technology to help its efforts fighting the pandemic.

Forbes

In August 2015, Professor Shinpei Kato from Nagoya University released the initial release of an open source system called Autoware. Autoware is an operating system for autonomous vehicles which contains all the major components (localization, mapping, route planning, vehicle/pedestrian identification, tracking, simulation, lane detection, sensor drivers/fusion, etc).


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Nikkei

HONG KONG — Making new friends, or even catching up with old ones, can be hard enough when you’re 93 years old and living in fear of the coronavirus.


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Venture Beat

Despite the fanfare around driverless cars’ potential to transform cities and make roads safer, the transition to a world in which autonomous vehicles rule the roost will likely be just that — a transition, one that could take decades longer than recent hype would suggest. There are myriad reasons for this, such as technological, regulatory, and infrastructural hurdles, meaning that even when driverless vehicles gain meaningful traction on public roads, they won’t always be able to maneuver without human intervention.


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Automotive World ($)

Automotive World’s special report on the legal implications of driverless cars discusses the liability, regulatory and insurance matters associated with deploying autonomous vehicles on public roads.


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Robb Report

What if you could do away with your captain and turn his quarters into your new billiards room? That fun—albeit overly confident—fantasy may not be that far off, thanks to some revolutionary new tech developed by DLBA Naval Architects.


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