#17
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  • Cars talking in Scotland (#5)
  • Cruise layoffs (#14)
  • Dude, where’s my car? (#10)
  • Wymo fundraising (#17)


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Financial Times ($)

The coronavirus shutdown is reshaping the internet-powered local services on which modern city dwellers depend. It is also giving city authorities plenty of reason to intervene to protect their vulnerable populations. Forcing through this change in a moment of crisis, and sorting out the winners from the losers, is guaranteed to be messy.


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New York Times

SAN FRANCISCO — Tech companies once promised that fully functional, self-driving cars would be on the road by 2020 and on the path to remaking transportation and transforming the economy.


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Harvard Business School

The rise of autonomous vehicles has enormous implications for business and society. Professors William R. Kerr and Elie Ofek explore the factors influencing development and commercialization as well as future success and consumer adoption in their recent case studies cases.


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Inverse

Tesla’s autonomous taxi service has a new timeframe for rolling out to consumers.


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The Scotsman

Cars could be able to “talk” to each other to warn about dangers on the roads using 5G technology in future, according to Scottish researchers.


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One of the important moments for self-driving cars will be what happens when there are many of them. Here The Scotsman talks to local researchers about inter-car communication.

Car and Driver

A few years ago, death was knocking on our driver’s-side doors. Driving was over. Done. Kaput. We would become passengers in our own vehicles as the autonomous revolution took over our roadways and garages. The message wasn’t coming just from Silicon Valley disrupters. In 2016, Mark Fields, then the CEO of Ford, told assembled press in Palo Alto, California, that his company intended to have robotaxis on the road in 2021. Everything was changing. But then it didn’t.


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Venture Beat

Today, a week after its cars resumed testing on public roads and days after it raised $750 million in capital, Waymo took the wraps off of an AI model it claims “significantly” improved its driverless systems’ ability to predict pedestrians’, cyclists’, and drivers’ behaviors. It’s called VectorNet, and it ostensibly provides more accurate projections while requiring less compute compared with previous approaches.


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ReadWrite

Autonomous cars aren’t a new concept. Almost all the major automakers are developing autonomous cars of some sort. Some, like Tesla’s Autopilot and Google’s Waymo, are already in use, though they’re not fully autonomous yet. Tesla and Waymo, like so many other automakers in the autonomous car race, are still ironing out the kinks.


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BBC

The rise of self-driving taxis in China comes at a time when people are nervous about taking public transport.


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Progress in self-driving cars was always going to impact public transit, though has the game changed with the coronavirus? Justin Harper reports for the BBC.

New York Times

The pandemic has accelerated some long-predicted technology habits like telemedicine and online grocery shopping. But driverless car technology might be kicked into reverse. The ubiquitous computer-driven car that seemed just around the corner for a decade is now further away than ever.


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Express Computer

Covid Analytics’ artificial intelligence program detects violations like Face Mask Detection, Social Distance Detection, and Vehicle Movement Detection through Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) during movement restrictions imposed by the administrative authorities. This system can be deployed on the shop floors, construction sites, manufacturing units, traffic lights/junctions, airports, and business parks among others.


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Smart Cities Drive

Editor’s Note: The following is a guest post from Betsy Plattenburg, executive director of Curiosity Lab at Peachtree Corners.


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Reuters

General Motors Co’s self-driving car unit Cruise on Thursday announced it was laying off about 8% of its staff, according to an internal e-mail.


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Silicon Angle

Waymo LLC, the Alphabet Inc. subsidiary developing self-driving taxis and trucks, today revealed that it has raised another $750 million in funding to support its efforts.


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Teslarati

Recent observations from the Tesla community indicate that the company’s new 2020.16.2 update has started showing animated movements for pedestrians and cyclists. Footage of the new animations in action was shared by Tesla owner-enthusiast and YouTube host JuliansRandomProject, who showcased the updated driving visualizations in a recent video.


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Bloomberg

Volkswagen AG and Ford Motor Co. are pushing ahead with plans to team up on electric and self-driving vehicles even as the coronavirus derails other projects, according to people familiar with the matter.


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Freight Waves

Waymo, the autonomous driving unit of Alphabet, announced Tuesday that it has raised a further $750 million in external investment. This investment is right behind the $2.25 billion financing the company raised in March — its first-ever non-Alphabet investment.


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Waymo is one of the leaders in autonomous driving, and has the money to show it. Here Freight Waves covers another round of investment.

Taipei Times

Siemens AG is collaborating with Taiwanese partners to conduct field trials for autonomous vehicles by the end of this year, as the German company aims to increase its foothold in the nation’s smart transportation sector.


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The Next Web

This is according to PitchBook’s Mobility Tech Q1 2020 report which says that much of this uptick was driven by three key deals.


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Reuters

Nvidia Corp, whose semiconductors power data centers, autonomous cars and robots, said on Thursday it plans to enter the market for technology that helps cars with automated lane-keeping, cruise control and other driver-assistance features.


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The Spoon

We’ve been covering the acceleration of robots being rolled out for contactless food deliveries in different cities across the country. As these li’l rover ‘bots become more public, the public is catching their first glimpse of, and shooting video of, our food delivery future.


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AI Business

Automaker Fiat Chrysler will supply purpose-built vehicles for self-driving startup Voyage.


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South China Morning Post

This initiative comes more than a year since Huawei released its 5G vehicle module, the MH5000


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Axios

The global pandemic may be reinforcing the logic for self-driving cars, but the economic fallout is likely to accelerate the consolidation trend that was already underway.


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Jalopnik

It’s possible that the past couple of months have been the biggest era in human history for sitting on one’s ass and watching TV. In our Golden Age of television, we have a vast array of options, some of which include some pleasingly if unsettlingly cynical portrayals of the near future. One show like this, Amazon Prime’s Upload, also happens to have what may be the most prescient portrayal of autonomous vehicles that I’ve seen anywhere.


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