#20
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  • Can they prevent crashes? (#3)
  • Keeping drivers alert (#13)
  • Tesla Autopilot video (#5)
  • Autonomous Russian tractors (#21)


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Business Insider ($)

Tesla’s new characteristic that permits Autopilot, the electric-car maker’s superior driver-assistance system, to acknowledge cease indicators and site visitors lights provides the system the power to in some instances function on metropolis streets and residential roads.


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Financial Express

According to 2019 Gartner forecasts, over 7,40,000 autonomous ready vehicles are expected to be added globally by the year 2023. Though the increase in the number of autonomous vehicles seems quite exciting, they may not actually represent sales of physical units as AV technology and regulations are still evolving. The present crisis may speed the R&D efforts and adoption of autonomous vehicles.


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Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

Driver mistakes play a role in virtually all crashes. That’s why automation has been held up as a potential game changer for safety. But autonomous vehicles might prevent only around a third of all crashes if automated systems drive too much like people, according to a new study from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.


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This study was picked up around the world, though you can read the original announcement here. It touches on what the future of safety may look like, and challenges the idea that autonomy will completely eliminate car crashes.

South China Morning Post

The IPO preparation comes as competition is expected to intensify in the world’s largest electric vehicle market


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The Drive

As the world attempts to resume normal operations following the COVID-19 pandemic’s initial hit, more and more drivers are finding their way back onto public roads. One such driver in Taiwan did so errantly, quickly finding himself in local headlines after traffic cameras captured his Tesla Model 3 failing to stop for an overturned commercial truck. And per the driver himself, Autopilot was engaged.


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New York Times

Fleets of vehicles roaming streets waiting to be hailed are more efficient. But the coronavirus has made people think twice about the future of car ownership even when autonomous tech arrives.


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IT Pro Portal

A recent report indicates that a third of network operators will rollout 5G standalone within two years. From a commercial perspective, this surge will be partly driven by an anticipation of new and emergence 5G-driven enterprise use cases. A recent study illuminating the impact of 5G on the growing Internet of Things (IoT), estimates that emerging use cases will result in 76 million 5G connections by 2025. And above all others, automotive and transportation (A&T) is the sector with the most rapid development in terms of IoT enablement. But the arrival of 5G is expected to supercharge the industry’s increasing focus on IoT applications development. The cumulative results of this growth will include the rapid emergence of smart, data-driven transportation applications and autonomous vehicles.


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TechCrunch

In the mid-1970s, Professor Fereidoun M. Esfandiary decided to change his name. From then on he would be legally called “FM-2030.”


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Bloomberg

Yandex plans to add 100 of the self-driving cars this year Detroit tests will go ahead even after car show canceled


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Arizona Republic

The Phoenix-based maker of zero-emission heavy trucks Nikola Corp. will become a publicly traded corporation later this week, possibly worth $11 billion or more, if a vote to approve its merger with another company succeeds as expected.


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The Economist ($)

But that will help it survive the pandemic and thrive afterwards


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Wall Street Journal ($)

Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi Chuxing Technology Co. raised more than $500 million in a funding round led by SoftBank Group Corp. for its autonomous-driving subsidiary, the company said Friday, as it competes with well-backed U.S. startups over self-driving technology.


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Stanford Engineering

Two researchers explain why designers should focus on developing systems that make it easy and natural for passengers to take control in an emergency.


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The amount of autonomy given to cars by their creators is of course a choice. Here Ernestine Fu and David Hyde argue based on their research that drivers shouldn’t be made to relax too much.

CleanTechnica

Earlier this month, Volkswagen announced it was rethinking its plan to use its SEAT brand to spearhead its electric vehicle efforts in China. It wasn’t exactly clear at that time what the company’s Plan B was. Certainly it was not abandoning its China plans, was it? This week, that question has been answered. The company now says it is prepared to invest $2.2 billion in its existing partnerships with Chinese companies.


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Mashable

The language we use is important, even when talking about robocars.


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AFP

JEJU, South Korea: In a workshop that blends a corporate office with a tool-packed garage, around 20 South Koreans are looking to take on the multi-billion-dollar giants of Uber, Tesla and Google parent Alphabet with a self-driving car of their own.


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Bloomberg

Pham’s willing embrace of unemployment sets him far apart from the 6,700 former colleagues who lost their jobs last month. He gave notice a week before the first of two large rounds of job cuts eliminated about a quarter of Uber’s workforce.


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The Verge

Amazon-backed EV startup Rivian has laid off about 40 employees at its headquarters in Plymouth, Michigan, The Verge has learned. The cuts, which the company has confirmed to The Verge, were made across departments and included engineers, recruiters, and others, according to two former employees. The company has also made a number of new executive hires, and has replaced its first chief operating officer.


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Mashable

Waymo is ready to get back to the business of being on the streets of California.


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Freight Waves

ZF Friedrichshafen AG said Friday it has completed its $7 billion acquisition of commercial vehicle technology supplier Wabco Holdings, which will become an independent division of the German company.


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Popular Mechanics

This system uses just one input that runs through a neural network to make an obstacle map.


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Self-driving may come not just to your personal car but many other places. We talk about trucking, though this piece looks at work in Russia on testing level three autonomy somewhere different, the farm.

Bloomberg Law

Elon Musk’s outbursts over the coronavirus-related closure of factory were familiar ground to Myra Pasek.


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C Tech

Within today’s food supply system, slaughterhouses are particularly dangerous and unhealthy environments that often employ minority and undocumented workers who do not know their rights or are too afraid of possible reprisals to exercise them. It is these abattoirs that are one of the food supply chain’s weakest links, as they are especially vulnerable to disruptions during crises like the current pandemic.


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TASS

“Within the cooperation, by the end of 2020, the Yandex fleet will add a hundred of such vehicles. In addition to testing in Moscow, some of them will be used in the unmanned taxi service in Innopolis, and some will also join the company’s test fleet in the Unites States,” the company noted.


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ZDNet

The funding will be invested to develop autonomous vehicles for Didi’s ride-hailing service.


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