Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Reach #107

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Deepnews Digest #107

Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Reach

Editor: Christopher Brennan
One of the core questions of Deepnews is how to best get people good information online. It’s a problem with dozens of facets, from algorithms to business concerns to the human right of expression. The question is always relevant, though particularly so this week, with news of Big Tech companies’ negotiations with Australian publishers, censorship in Southeast Asia and continuing discussion of content moderation in the U.S. For this week’s Digest I decided to combine the related topics of freedom of speech and “freedom of reach” online, using the Deepnews algorithm to find and score articles from all over the world.

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Published every Friday

LA Times

Working with Larry Flynt was an adrenaline rush — and an education

I was Larry Flynt’s book publicist and personal publicist for 15 years — from 1996, three months before the movie “The People vs. Larry Flynt” was released, until 2011. I watched him be mesmerized by Terry Gross during their “Fresh Air” interview and get slaughtered by Bill O’Reilly on Fox News. He did all the shows — Bill Maher to Larry King, CNN again and again, and I’d play poker with him to pass the time in every green room in town.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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Washington Post

A quarter of Trump’s 6,081 Facebook posts last year featured misinformation or extreme rhetoric

In all of 2020, The Washington Post counted the removal by Facebook of just seven posts by Trump and his campaign, four of which were for copyright-related issues. Trump and his campaign shared an account.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 71%

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The Times (UK) ($)

Meghan’s victory against The Mail on Sunday is a worry for the media

Lord Justice Warby’s decision in the saga of the Duchess of Sussex and the publication of extracts from a letter to her father failed to produce a fairytale ending for a Fleet Street stalwart.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 70%

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Vox

“Don’t be evil” isn’t a normal company value. But Google isn’t a normal company.

Silicon Valley is full of lofty ideals. But few are as lofty as Google’s most famous motto: “Don’t be evil.”

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Score: stars image Confidence: 62%

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World Politics Review ($)

‘Watching People Become Citizens’: Clubhouse’s Brief Run in China

Sometimes springtime comes and goes in a flash. That’s the way things felt early this month, when people who follow China were left agog at the extraordinary flourishing of discussion on Clubhouse, the young but fast-growing app that combines social media with audio chat.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 61%

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Sydney Morning Herald

Payday: How Australia tamed the Google gorilla

It’s raining Google dollars in Australian media land. Whether it’s a drenching or a light shower depends on who you talk to, but it’s way more generous than publishers overseas have managed to negotiate with the gorilla of digital platforms.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 58%

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NY Post

Media’s censorious gatekeepers are mad — because they’re losing power

With Donald Trump out of office and de-platformed, you’d think mainstream media gatekeepers would be happy. You’d think wrong.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 58%

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The Conversation

Internet blackouts in Myanmar allow the military to retain control

Myanmar citizens have been living under military control for weeks after the country’s military staged a coup. Citing issues of electoral fraud in the November 2020 general elections, the military detained elected officials, including civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi, and implemented a national internet shutdown.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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Australian Financial Review ($)

Facebook news ban: Australian news is a commodity Facebook can afford to lose

The overarching reason for Facebook’s dramatic decision to push the nuclear button and ban all news sharing for its Australian users is plain for all to see. It desperately needs to keep control of its virtual world, and figures it won’t take too much of a revenue hit.

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Editor’s Note:

The news (or lack of news) out of Australia this week was followed around the world. This article from the AFR focuses on Facebook, with the one above from the SMH focused on Google. Both highlighted by our algorithm as worth reading to understand more. – Christopher Brennan, Editor

Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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The Tennessean

Stand up for facts: How universities can lead America back toward reasoned debate | Opinion

Universities have an obligation to become firm advocates for the restoration of reason, rationality and honesty into our national dialogue.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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The Wire

‘Hate Speech in India Relies on Stoking Fear to Escape Criminal Action’: Study

New Delhi: To circumvent laws that criminalise hate speech online, supporters of the Bharatiya Janata Party used ‘fear’ as a subtler method to provoke people on public WhatsApp groups to target minorities, especially Muslims, a new study on the 2019 Indian general elections has found.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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POLITICO EU

Australia reruns Europe’s Big Tech copyright battle

It’s not every day that media baron Rupert Murdoch is considered an underdog. But in Australia, where Big Tech is facing down the country’s publishers, it’s clear who has more power — and it’s not the country’s newspapers.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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EU Observer ($)

Jailing of rapper spotlights Spain’s free-speech row

Dozens of Spanish police on Tuesday (16 February) arrested a musician who had locked himself, together with a group of supporters, in a university in Catalonia – in a bid to avoid prison for insulting state institutions and praising terrorism on social media.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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Michigan Radio

How the mistrust caused by the Flint water crisis is seeping into views of the COVID-19 vaccine

Staff and volunteers of the Greater Holy Temple Church of God in Christ have been handing out bottled water to Flint residents since lead was found in city tap water six years ago.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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Reason

How To Fight Deplatforming: Decentralize

Does America need a Reality Czar? That was New York Times tech columnist Kevin Roose’s suggestion for how the Biden administration could help solve the so-called “reality crisis” facing the country.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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Human Rights Watch

Cambodia: Internet Censorship, Control Expanded

The Cambodian government’s new National Internet Gateway will enable the government to increase online surveillance, censorship, and control of the internet that will seriously infringe on rights to free expression and privacy, Human Rights Watch said today.

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Editor’s Note:

While the world has watched the events in Myanmar in recent weeks, including a crackdown on the internet, nearby Cambodia also has put in new rules on expression. Here our algorithm, which looks at sources beyond hard news, highlighted an article from Human Rights Watch. – Christopher Brennan, Editor


Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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Associated Press

Dozens charged in Capitol riots spewed extremist rhetoric

Doctor Farah Bede is a GP in Tower Hamlets who wants to study the impact of coronavirus on her community Street protests rarely bring about political change in isolation, actual change usually comes from self-interested elites. COLLEGE PARK, MD. — In a text message, a radicalized Trump supporter suggested getting a boat to ferry “heavy weapons” across the Potomac River into the waiting arms of their members in time for Jan. 6, court papers say.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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AFP

Thousands rally in Yangon despite military build-up, UN expert ‘terrified’ violence could ensue

YANGON: Thousands were rallying in Yangon on Wednesday (Feb 17) to protest against the military coup despite a build-up of troops and fears of violence escalating.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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KGUN9 Tucson

STUDY: Arizonans seeking extremist, conspiracy, violent content online

PHOENIX — A recent study found Arizonans sought out violent extremism and conspiracy theories online more than almost any other state.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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New Statesman

What we lose when local news disappears

A battle is being played out in Australia that will determine the future of news. It pitches old media stalwarts, including Rupert Murdoch and the Guardian, against the new media giants.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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Quartz

The toolkit—an international conspiracy in India—is a common practice in protests across the globe

The world’s largest democracy is riled up over an e-document.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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Voice of America

Ten Years After Arab Spring, Egypt’s Press Freedom Dwindles

In February 2011, thousands gathered in Cairo’s Tahrir Square demanding democracy and greater freedoms, including for the media.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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Deutsche Welle

‘Hotel Rwanda’ hero’s terrorism trial starts

The trial of Paul Rusesabagina, a long-time critic of President Paul Kagame, has begun in Rwanda’s capital, Kigali.

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Editor’s Note:

After the tragic events of the 1990s, Rwanda has enacted strict rules on hate speech. Here our algorithm highlighted a report from DW about the terrorism trial of Paul Rusesabagina, famed for his portrayal by Hollywood. – Christopher Brennan, Editor


Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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ABC Australia

Facebook ban potentially ‘dangerous’ for Indigenous vaccine rollout

Indigenous health and media groups fear Facebook’s shutdown of community pages could have a dangerous impact on regional communities during the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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The Nation

The Fight Against France’s Global Security Law Is Far From Over

Why don’t French activists accept the Macron government’s rationale for a new law limiting the public’s right to share images of police brutality? Maybe because they’ve read it.

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Score: stars image Confidence: 99%

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