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  • The public health response
  • Stopping the next virus
  • Adelaide’s first biome lab
  • Learning from SARS


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Associated Press

NEW DELHI — A British citizen appeared at a public hospital in India’s capital with a cough, difficulty breathing and a private clinic’s referral for a coronavirus test. She was turned away.


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Nature

We must urgently develop measures to tackle the new coronavirus — but safety always comes first, says Shibo Jiang.


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The Guardian

Many doctors and nurses don’t understand why the UK isn’t doing more to control the spread.


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The Washington Post

The risk stares us in the face. More needs to be done to end the trade in wild animals.


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InDaily

Adelaide’s first purpose-built poo laboratory opened this week to help take South Australia’s pioneering fight against debilitating gut conditions global.


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Though this Distill is dominated by coronavirus, here is one on another topic in the world of medical research, inflammatory bowel conditions. Belinda Willis explores Adelaide’s first biome lab that has been set up to fight against debilitating gut conditions.

The Conversation

As my governor closes all the public schools and public libraries here in Seattle, I’m thinking about 1981 – the year when newspapers in New York and Los Angeles reported that a strange new virus was killing healthy young men.


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The Guardian

There has been a huge difference in how the coronavirus pandemic has evolved in different countries. Some have gone nearly two months with just a few dozen cases; others have seen an outbreak explode in weeks.


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Xinhua Net

Some vaccines for the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) are expected to enter clinical trials as soon as possible in China, officials said at a press conference on Tuesday.


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Bloomberg

Nizana Brautmann found out her 6-year-old son had been exposed to coronavirus via a note on the locked door of his Berlin daycare center on Monday morning. It told parents to take their kids home and wait.


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CGTN

In the fight against COVID-19 spreading across the globe with an alarming speed, a slew of affected countries are compelled to take immediate reactions. While France and Spain are following Italy into a nationwide lockdown, the UK astounds international medical scientists with its “herd immunity” approach – if enough people get infectious and become immune to COVID-19, the virus’ potency will be tremendously reduced.


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Indian Express

A network of 65 laboratories of the Department of Health Research and the Indian Council of Medical Research (DHR-ICMR) will now test 20 samples each week — 10 of influenza-like illnesses and 10 of severe acute respiratory infection — for Covid-19.


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The Guardian

Public health experts and hundreds of doctors and scientists at home and abroad are urging the UK government to change its strategy against coronavirus, amid fears it will mean the epidemic “lets rip” through the population.


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Science

Evolutionary biologist Richard Lenski at Michigan State University spends a lot of time thinking about how microbes grow. Since 1988, his team has watched populations of Escherichia coli bacteria grow and evolve in the lab through more than 73,000 generations. So when cases of COVID-19, caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, appeared in the United States, he knew to expect exponential growth—these first cases were just a hint of what was to come.


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The scientific community is stepping up to fight coronavirus, though the disease has also had effects on the world of research writ large because of restrictions. Here Science reports.

DW

On March 9, Italy – the worst-hit by coronavirus outside of China – extended its lockdown to the entire country in a bid to curb the spread. That decision in the European country of 60 million resonated with many in West Africa.


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The Lancet

Person-to-person transmission of SARS-CoV-2 occurred between two people with prolonged, unprotected exposure while the first patient was symptomatic.


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Science

George Thompson, an infectious disease specialist at the medical center, was on the team that cared for the California patient and spoke to ScienceInsider about the case. This interview has been edited for clarity and length; additional information added by ScienceInsider is in brackets.


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AFP

New Delhi: When amputee Shreya Siddanagowder was offered new hands, the Indian student didn’t hesitate – even though they were big, dark and hairy, and once belonged to a man.


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The Conversation

Anywhere from 20% to 60% of the adults around the world may be infected with the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease COVID-19.


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Gizmodo

More and more research is starting to confirm a troubling suspicion scientists have had about covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus: People without symptoms can not only spread the infection but are actually fueling its pandemic spread across the globe.


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The Lancet

During the past 3 weeks, new major epidemic foci of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), some without traceable origin, have been identified and are rapidly expanding in Europe, North America, Asia, and the Middle East, with the first confirmed cases being identified in African and Latin American countries.


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Washington Post

SARS-CoV-2, commonly known as the novel coronavirus, is officially a global pandemic. Multiple chains of transmission are underway in dozens of countries. Heroic efforts, such as instituting worldwide isolation measures like those in Wuhan, China, and in Italy might still slow the spread — but the impact of doing that everywhere could be even worse than the disease. So the virus will traverse the world, probably infecting between 40 and 70 percent of the global population during its first wave.


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Press Trust of India

The review, published in the Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, noted that the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, seems to cause fewer symptoms and less severe disease in children compared with adults.Children have fewer symptoms and less severe disease from infection with the novel coronavirus, according to a review of studies which suggests that kids infected by a household contact often show symptoms before them.


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One feature of coronavirus has been its lack of severe effects on children. This report looks at a study from researchers in Switzerland and Australia.

Mashable

First, the obligatory caveat: There’s still so much we don’t know about the novel coronavirus and COVID-19, the disease that results from the virus. New genetic developments are coming everyday — so fast that even the CDC can’t keep up.


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AFP

The new coronavirus was detectable for up to 4 hours on copper, and two to 3 days on plastic and stainless steel, and for up to 24 hours on cardboard.


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Citizen

Blade Nzimande says it is important for researchers in South Africa to coordinate a response to the outbreak to facilitate its control.


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