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  • Food security (#1)
  • COVID and meat packing (#12)
  • New coating to protect food (#4)
  • Fasting and hunger (#22)


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Earth Institute – Columbia University

According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting the world’s food systems and disrupting regional agricultural trade and value chains. The FAO has warned that food shortages are a real risk in the coming months.


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Open Democracy

A growing trend in the food system is challenging this notion and showing how different our relationship to food could be. Community-supported agriculture (CSA), is an alternative approach based on the core idea that food is social: food expresses how much we rely on each other and on our environment, and it is up to us to make that relationship as resilient and sustainable as possible.


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Food Ingredients First

The COVID-19 pandemic is having myriad effects on small plant-based businesses. That is according to The Good Food Institute (GFI) Director of Corporate Engagement Alison Rabschnuk, who flags that plant-based brands have experienced some negative impacts on their business amid the global crisis. “It may take that sector a long time to recover,” she claims.


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Texas A&M University

Texas A&M researchers have created a coating that can be applied to surfaces like conveyor belts and collection buckets.


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Protecting food items from contamination is extremely important, especially during times of a pandemic. Texas A&M researchers have created a new dual-action coating that can protect food items from being contaminated by bacteria.

Green Biz

With everyone flocking to supermarkets to stockpile eggs and meat, protein is front of mind for many during the uncertain times of COVID-19 outbreak. But could a tiny aquatic vegetable become the primary source of protein for millions of people worldwide? An Israeli start-up believes so.


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Rolling Stone

On a recent pre-pandemic night in February, Mindy’s HotChocolate in Chicago was buzzing for a unique “Flavor Trip” tasting event. Industry folks and influencers mingled between exquisite stations, each offering a distinct, fruit-forward pairing.


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The Star (Malaysia)

Our best hope for avoiding another devastating outbreak is to switch to ‘clean meat’.


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The Hindu Business Line

From heavy monsoon rains to lockdown disruptions, rabi 2019-20 has been no cakewalk.


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The Nation

Larry Collins is a big, gregarious man with tobacco-stained teeth, a salty tongue, and the commanding presence of a sea captain. For 40 years he has earned his living as a commercial fisherman, slinging wild-caught seafood from a bustling warehouse on Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco.


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The Wire

New Delhi: On March 26, finance minister Nirmala Sitharaman announced that the government had decided that all ration card holders in India will be provided one kilogram of pulses every month starting April, for a period of three months. This was a part of the PM Garib Kalyan package – the Centre’s only relief measure so far to deal with the consequences of the lockdown for the poor.


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Bloomberg

Rome – “It is easy to see the beginnings of things and harder to see the ends,” Joan Didion wrote in “Goodbye to All That.” Her words resonate in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, when no one has a clue whether we’re at the beginning, in the middle or near the end. In sub-Saharan Africa the not knowing is especially worrisome, because it’s difficult to tell whether the continent’s fragile food supply systems will weather the strain.


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iPolitics

As the global pandemic has unfolded over the last month, people have become concerned about the security and resilience of our food systems. For instance, on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border enormous meat-packing plants have closed as workers test positive for COVID-19.


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The Telegraph

Catastrophic food shortages and mass starvation are threatening greater devastation than the virus itself.


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The Conversation

Food insecurity is a reality for many South African households, with approximately 50% of households living under the poverty line and not being able to afford basic healthy eating. Low-income households typically spend about a third of total expenditure on food.


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Food aid has been a topic of great interest amidst the ongoing pandemic. But are we paying enough attention to the nutritional balance of food aid parcels? This article from The Conversation studies the case of South Africa.

Al Jazeera

We need to stop depending on corporations and big agribusiness for our food. The pandemic has made it clear why.


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Translational Photosynthesis

During the past few weeks, empty supermarket shelves, without pasta, rice and flour due to panic buying, has caused public concerns about the possibility of running out of food. Australian farmers have reassured consumers saying that the country produces enough food to feed three times its population.


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Al Jazeera

Farmers suffer huge losses and communities struggle amid high levels of seawater intruding into the freshwater delta.


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Vietnam is among the world’s largest sources of seafood and related items. Here Zoe Osborne reports about a salt drought that threatens to destroy the country’s marine life.

Mail & Guardian

President Cyril Ramaphosa is announcing a further package of economic measures tonight. The government has been scaling up food parcels as part of the social relief of distress grants system.


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Deccan Herald

New doors need to be built and kept open to ensure accessibility and availability of food for the poor and migrant workers in these difficult times.


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The Wire

In a recent interview to NDTV, P. Sainath made a telling remark: “How often is it for us, as people in India, especially in times of a grave crisis, to be deeply affected from those at the margins losing their lives, but remain hardly affected otherwise by the conditions of their state of living.” After four weeks of a nationwide blanket lockdown, this terse remark by one of India’s most prominent voices sums up both the states’ and the elites’ collective torpid response to the plight of the most vulnerable.


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Vice

“Being zero-waste… helps one become more conscious of everyday habits and the environment, which is a plus in these times.”


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Anadolu

Many had been looking forward to Ramadan iftars at mosques for survival during pandemic.


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Indian Express

In the time of COVID-19, the trending of #foodporn points to a glaring inequality.


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CBC News

Looking for flour at your local grocer? You might be out of luck.


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Vice

A few days ago, under the ongoing lockdown to contain the spread of coronavirus in India, Diipti Jhangiani — a resident of Bandra in Mumbai, India — was walking through a 50-square-meter [538-square-feet] patch of land inside her building complex. In it were robust hedges of tomatoes, carrots, okra, spinach, papayas, chikoos, drumsticks, bitter gourd, and other vegetables. She dug up some fresh turmeric to take back home. “During a crisis like [this pandemic], there will always be a shortage of food for those who can’t afford it,” says the 34-year-old urban farmer and the founder of an agricultural startup called Edible Gardens. “And even for those who can, there are some shortages. We’ve run out of haldi (turmeric) in the stores nearby. But I’ve been growing haldi in my community farm in my society, so we’re using that instead. And it’s so much fresher.”


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