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  • Fake meat startups flourish (#1)
  • Tracing meat via blockchain (#8)
  • Microbiomes to improve yield (#6)
  • Growing your own food (#16)


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Bloomberg

With meat-processing workers falling victim to COVID-19, shuttering plants and slowing supply, Americans are starting to see poorly stocked aisles where once beef and pork were plentiful. At the same time, the link between industrial meat production and deadly human viruses has become more widely understood.


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Grist

The coronavirus pandemic has transformed how Americans get our food. We’re no longer going to restaurants; we’re limiting our trips to the grocery store. Many of us are, for the first time, ordering groceries online.


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Anadolu

Crops destroyed, livestock euthanized as joblessness skyrockets and people question where their next meal will come from.


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The New York Times

Some producers acknowledge the efforts are “just a drop in the bucket” of what farmers can’t sell and are destroying instead.


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The Verdict

One of the industries undoubtedly feeling the effects of the current Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic is the restaurants and hospitality industry. According to the Office of National Statistics, 79% of those furloughed in the UK due to the Covid-19 pandemic were from the food and accommodation industries.


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Northern Arizona University

The global demand and consumption of agricultural crops is increasing at a rapid pace. According to the 2019 Global Agricultural Productivity Report, global yield needs to increase at an average annual rate of 1.73 percent to sustainably produce food, feed, fiber and bioenergy for 10 billion people in 2050.


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As the demand for food continues to go up, we need to find new ways to increase supplies. Researchers from the Northern Arizona University have found a way to improve crop yields using microbiomes.

Asian Scientist

While farmers have always been subject to the vagaries of soil and seasons, they now face unprecedented challenges that threaten to radically alter the ancient art of agriculture. Food now flows into a supply chain network spanning the globe, with hidden dependencies and a tendency toward wild fluctuations in demand and supply.


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Coin Telegraph

To gain transparency and consumer safety, the food-processing and meatpacking plants are implementing blockchain technology to their operation services.


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The New Indian Express

There was a time, not too long ago, when none of it was to be found in India. Now, boutique eateries and high-end supermarkets have begun to stock several varieties.


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Food Ingredients First

Kellogg has revealed that it is delaying its Incogmeato brand launch in light of the coronavirus outbreak. CEO Steven Cahillane flags that given the current situation, the company remains focused on supplying the market with food.


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The COVID-19 crisis has had a major impact on several companies. Kellogg is one of these, as it delays the launch of its punnily-named Incogmeato brand, Elizabeth Green reports.

Irish Times

Ireland’s beef, dairy, seafood and spirits are much sought after the world over and exports of food and drink from our shores reached a record €13 billion in 2019, delivering 67 per cent growth in a decade.


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BBC

Tinned and frozen fruits and vegetables tend to be seen as less nutritious than fresh versions. But that’s not always the case.


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The Spoon

Spanish startup Novameat announced today that it had developed a realistic plant-based pork product with the same texture as real meat. And it couldn’t have come at a more opportune time.


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The Jerusalem Post

Tefilla Buxbaum, the English-language spokeswoman for Israel’s Yad Ezra v’Shulamit, told the Magazine that when she shares that statistic, people simply don’t believe her. Yet, according to Buxbaum, for a third of Israel’s children, approximately 800,000 of them, hunger is a daily challenge.


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Associated Press

DES MOINES – After spending two decades raising pigs to send to slaughterhouses, Dean Meyer now faces the mentally draining, physically difficult task of killing them even before they leave his northwest Iowa farm.


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Daily Maverick

We are living in very strange times. Drought, fires, load shedding, ice floes, unemployment, coronavirus. The year isn’t looking like a very good one but there are signs of positive growth – urban gardening is trending in the wake of the worldwide Covid-19 lockdown.


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As the world faces food supply issues, should we look to grow our own crops? Melanie Farrelll argues that urban gardening could be the way forward.

The Mercury News

The line outside of West Valley Community Services in Cupertino stretched down the block. Longtime volunteers and staff had never seen such a massive need for the nonprofit’s services.


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The Washington Post

A month ago, they were called “service workers”: the people who prepare our food, deliver our packages, drive our buses, clean our offices and staff our nursing homes. Then, the coronavirus changed this country’s collective vocabulary.


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The Hill

Before COVID-19 most of us took for granted that whatever we needed would be on grocery store shelves, whether we were looking for carefully budgeted staple items or ingredients for a special dinner.


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Counter Punch

El Salvador is showing very different faces. While some people herald its young president for his forceful actions as the savior of the country and even an example for Latin America, others denounce him for his disregard for Salvadorian law, the blatant violations of human rights committed under his regime, and his seeming aspirations as a populist, authoritarian leader.


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The Conversation

The UK government message is clear: we are all in this pandemic together. Everyone is urged to stay at home and the businesses that are losing out from lockdown have been offered significant financial assistance.


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San Francisco Chronicle

It’s been seven weeks since the Bay Area began to shelter in place in an attempt to stem the rising tide of novel coronavirus infections, and it’s clear that the world has changed irrevocably. The way we eat has shifted to something more private and more fraught.


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The Atlantic

The coronavirus will change grocery stores, and probably not for the better.


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Stanford Daily

Toilet paper, sanitizer, baby wipes, water, rice, eggs — the list of “limit one” items at stores like Target and Costco continues to grow as panicked shoppers stock up on the “essentials.” Empty shelves, cleaned-out aisles and rising prices — the earliest symptoms of shortage — have become a familiar, often frustrating sight to consumers nationwide.


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Counter Punch

In addition to the global health crisis and the coming worldwide economic collapse, Covid-19 is fuelling a humanitarian crisis. The World Food Program (WFP) warns that, “millions of civilians living in conflict-scarred nations, including many women and children, face being pushed to the brink of starvation, with the spectre of famine a very real and dangerous possibility.”


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