#17
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  • Contactless deliveries (#2)
  • The power of prawn shells (#8)
  • Where’s the beef? (#4)
  • Food crisis in Sahel (#14)
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Food Ingredients First
Advances in food printers provide opportunity for flavor, texture and nutritional content customization.

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Inc42
Cloud kitchens and restaurants have to focus on safety and hygiene first, as that’s what the consumer will want.

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Business Insider
The coronavirus pandemic has been devastating for restaurants across the board.

Editor’s Note: Although the entire restaurant industry is suffering from the effects of the COVID crisis, buffets are proving to be the real losers. Here Irene Jiang argues that their decline had started long before the current pandemic began.

Associated Press
U.S. meat supplies are dwindling due to coronavirus-related production shutdowns. As a result, some stores like Costco and restaurants like Wendy’s are limiting sales.

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The Conversation
Both Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat, two of the biggest players in the rapidly expanding meat alternatives market, claim their vegan burger patties (made primarily from a variety of plant proteins and oils) are 90% less climate polluting than a typical beef patty produced in the United States.

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Bloomberg
Shortages may cause shoppers to embrace alternative proteins.

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Forbes
In September 2019 — two months before the first reported case of the coronavirus — the World Health Organization published a report that said, “…there is a very real threat of a rapidly moving, highly lethal pandemic of a respiratory pathogen killing 50 to 80 million people and wiping out nearly 5 percent of the world’s economy… The world is not prepared.”

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Nanyang Technological University
Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a green way to create chitin, by using two forms of food waste – prawn shells and discarded fruit – and fermenting them.

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Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN
“The combined challenge of rising global hunger and the COVID-19 pandemic reminds us that innovation and the application of science and technology have always been and must continue to be the cornerstone or the foundation of agriculture,” said Beth Bechdol, newly appointed Deputy Director General at the UN Food and Agriculture Organization.

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Mashable
Picture two industries. One is increasingly associated in the consumer’s mind with dirt and disease. Not only is much of its product pumped full of antibiotics and covered in fecal matter, not only does it come with an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer, but now its workers are testing positive for coronavirus in droves, and its supply chain is in pain.

Editor’s Note: Our meat-eating habits have been changing rapidly in recent times. Chris Taylor predicts that the end of real meat may be sooner than we think given current momentum.

Western Producer
A researcher at the University of Guelph says the COVID-19 pandemic will spark agility — particularly related to technology — in agriculture.

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Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES — Near downtown Los Angeles, a meat processing plant ramped up production even as it worked to keep frontline employees separated from one another. In Salinas, Calif., a lettuce grower hustled to redirect supply after being forced to plow under unused crops.

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Food Navigator USA
The radio silence that emerging brands sometimes experience when reaching out to retail buyers for the first time can feel daunting and demoralizing, but Brad Charron, the CEO of the plant-based bar and beverage brand Aloha, advises entrepreneurs not to take it personally and not to give up.

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Chatham House
The COVID-19 pandemic has struck the Sahel and West Africa at a time when the region is already under severe pressure from violent insecurity and the effects of climate change on its land, food and water resources.

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New York Times
The pandemic has turned many cooks into big-volume shoppers, and left them puzzling out how to manage a bursting pantry of ingredients.

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Nature
The greater risk for food insecurity and social unrest comes not from the supply, but from the demand side. The measures taken to safeguard public health are prompting an unusually large and rapid economic contraction. Unprecedented numbers of people are losing their jobs, businesses and livelihoods. As COVID-19 begins to impact low- and middle-income economies, the rise in poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition will be serious.

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Press Trust of India
As part of efforts to provide food security to the helpless people, members of Mission Shakti SHGs have provided 2.05 lakh meals to Aahar Kendras, subsidized food centres in municipal areas, they said.

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New York Times
As a padlocked economy leaves millions of Americans without paychecks, lines outside food banks have stretched for miles, prompting some of the overwhelmed charities to seek help from the National Guard.

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Santa Cruz Sentinel
WATSONVILLE — Flanked by rows of strawberry beds, Apolinar Yerena stood in the center of his 11-acre Watsonville farm, reflecting on the pandemic threatening its future. “I’ve been farming for 40 years,” said the 68-year-old owner of Yerena Farms. “This is the worst thing that has happened.”

Editor’s Note: It has been widely noted that farmers have been particularly hard hit by the current pandemic. Jesse Kathan discusses the plight of American farmers and notes how they are dealing with it in this report from Watsonville, the strawberry capital of the world.

The Logic
As online grocery shopping booms in Canada amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Loblaw has expedited the launch of a next-day meal-kit delivery service.

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Project Syndicate
Every year, some nine million people worldwide – equivalent to the population of Austria – die of hunger or hunger-related diseases. That is tragic enough, but COVID-19’s disruption of food supply chains risks doubling this number in 2020.

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Truthout
As the COVID-19 crisis intensifies, a Depression-era double-whammy food crisis has emerged.

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The Wire
New Delhi: A month ago, on April 7, Chief Justice of India S.A. Bobde asked public interest lawyer Prashant Bhushan: “If they are being provided meals, then why do they need money for meals?”

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Anadolu
Despite the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, Turkey is not expected to face any major problems in its short- or mid-term food supply or food security, the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said on Thursday.

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Voice of America
Few images conjure the 1930s Depression like people standing in soup lines while farmers dump food they can’t sell. That is a tragedy Southeast Asia is fighting to avoid, though it is starting to happen in pockets around the world in the midst of COVID-19.

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