#18
single distill image banner

  • Jackfruit goes global (#3)
  • View of restaurant owner (#12)
  • Farmer food waste (#4)
  • Indoor farming in St. Louis (#20)


Selection and ranking powered by

deepnews logo


Story Source
Horizon Magazine

Installing wireless sensors among crops and attaching ‘smart’ ear tags to livestock could help farmers produce more food with less impact on the environment.


Editor’s Note:


Like the tagline of this newsletter says, we are fast approaching 10 billion people. In order to feed the extra mouths, we’ll need to innovate and improve our farming practices. Horizon magazine reports about new crop and animal sensors that could help our farms in becoming more productive.

CBS News

That search for meat alternatives plays right into the hands of plant-based meat producers like Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods. The companies look to provide plant-based options for the most popular kinds of animal protein products and, in the midst of the current crisis, they could see more customer trials of their products.


Editor’s Note:


AFP

Green, spiky and with a strong, sweet smell, the bulky jackfruit has morphed from a backyard nuisance in India’s south coast into the meat-substitute darling of vegans and vegetarians in the West.


Editor’s Note:


Bloomberg

‘The rigidity of our food system’ is leading to trashed crops Impact on food security could be devastating for millions.


Editor’s Note:


Supermarket News

Grocery stores see sales slow compared to March but post 13.2% year-over-year gain.


Editor’s Note:


Reuters

Yemen, already pushed to the brink of famine by a five-year war, could see a “catastrophic” food security situation due to the coronavirus pandemic and lower remittances from the Gulf, the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) said on Monday.


Editor’s Note:


Fortune

With the meat processing industry in a tailspin amid Tyson and Smithfield plant closures owing to outbreaks of COVID-19, there is a potential nationwide meat shortage looming. This shortage, coupled with consumer uncertainty during this anxious time, has seemingly contributed to a surge in demand for plant-based alternatives.


Editor’s Note:


Quartz

In San Francisco, a group of renderings hangs on a wall near the product development kitchen at JUST, one of about a dozen main companies working to market cell-cultured meat. The drawings show a large facility that’s accessible to the public, a place where people can walk up and peer through large windows at shiny vats filled with growing animal cells — created without ever having to kill an animal. It looks like a giant brewery.


Editor’s Note:


Food Ingredients First

The pandemic is seen as a double-edged sword for the plant-based space.


Editor’s Note:


Food Navigator

Ag-tech company Agrimetrics is launching a new, interactive tool for looking at food and farming data. It claims it will improve sustainability and productivity by accelerating artificial intelligence and advanced analytics.


Editor’s Note:


University of Aberdeen

Like humans, insects are more likely to change their diet and try new things when in a new location, a new study has found.


Editor’s Note:


They are often forgotten about unless they are buzzing in front of your face, though bugs play an important part in the food process. Here the University of Aberdeen looks at insects on the move, and what that could mean for crops.

Business Insider ($)

The restaurant industry has been devastated by the coronavirus pandemic. As restaurants across the country were ordered to close their doors, much of what makes our cities and towns vibrant went with it.


Editor’s Note:


Daily Maverick

America’s beef shortage due to Covid-19 is accelerating the move towards alternative protein burgers.


Editor’s Note:


The Buffalo News

In the face of the Covid-19 pandemic, our neighbors across New York State are struggling against unprecedented hardships, including hunger.


Editor’s Note:


New York Times

BOYNTON BEACH – The new kitchen was still under construction here at the Palm Beach County branch of Feeding South Florida, a food bank, when Chrissy Benoit walked through the warehouse in March. Fruits and vegetables had started arriving in unusually large amounts from nearby farms, which got her thinking about the cooking she would do when the kitchen was finished.


Editor’s Note:


European Commission

Almost half of what we throw away is organic waste — banana skins, a few leftovers… Most cities are collecting this type of waste separately from households. But very few cities are making good use of it. The most common treatment methods — composting and anaerobic digestion — mainly result in low-value products. SCALIBUR partners are developing a process to help cities make higher added value products from this waste stream.


Editor’s Note:


Food waste continues to be a major problem for us, especially during times of crisis when the focus is on other things. Here, a project backed by the European Commission is developing a process to help create higher added value products from such waste.

Green Biz

Today I bring you exclusive data from the cutting edge of food science. Let me begin by managing expectations. This experiment is so grievously flawed that, to paraphrase Groucho Marx, I would not submit it to any journal likely to accept it.


Editor’s Note:


Daily Maverick

Though the present is grim, no matter how different tomorrow looks, humans inherently want to connect and socialise. Restaurants have the unparalleled ability to facilitate this. It’s how each restaurant, and the industry as a whole, adapts to this seismic shift that will define the future of eating out.


Editor’s Note:


Variety

Four weeks ago, a group of college students came together in an effort to do something about the supply-chain disconnect that has led to farmers throwing away fresh produce at a time when food banks are seeing huge spikes in demand.


Editor’s Note:


Fast Company

A network of caves in St. Louis, Missouri, was once used for brewing beer before the advent of refrigeration. Now, the conservation organization World Wildlife Fund is interested in helping the city repurpose some of that unused space for indoor farming — in a new pilot that can demonstrate how the indoor agriculture industry can become more sustainable and a viable way to make the food system more resilient.


Editor’s Note:


Dhaka Tribune

The issue of food and nutrition security has come to the fore in Bangladesh as the agricultural production systems have been seriously disrupted by the on-going coronavirus crisis.


Editor’s Note:


ABC (Australia) Fact Check

Agriculture Minister David LIttleproud says Australia has the best food security in the world. RMIT ABC Fact Check investigates.


Editor’s Note:


Portland Press Herald

Let’s expand the market for local farms and food producers and treat those who grow, sell and serve our food as essential.


Editor’s Note:


New Hope Network

New digital platform connects consumers with farmers as restaurant channel shrinks and food system adjusts to pandemic pinch points.


Editor’s Note:


The Spoon

As an entrepreneur who got his start hawking computer parts out of the back of a Ryder van, Rutledge’s first company Woot pioneered the ‘deal of the day’ model years before anyone had heard of Groupon. Over time, Woot became known for its kooky sense of humor as its as much its business model, which Rutledge once described as “just selling stuff cheap.”


Editor’s Note:



($) = This source has a hard paywall. You will need to suscribe to view this article.