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Meduza
A decade ago, demand for vegan and vegetarian products began to grow rapidly across Europe and in North America. By 2018, the global vegan food market size was valued at $12.69 billion and expected to expand to over $24 billion by 2025. Vegetarians and vegans account for only part of this growing demand.

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Grist
The choice seemed obvious: Burger A was the real meat, Burger B the one made from plants. Glenn Beck was sure of it. During a broadcast of his radio show last May, he took a big bite of the first burger, and knew.

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PanDaily
As African Swine Fever decimates China’s pork supplies, and scientists continue to proclaim the current consumption rate of meat unsustainable, entrepreneurs have rushed to fill a new demand for artificial meat substitutes. China has birthed ambitious startups for this market, including Whole Perfect Food, Jinzi Ham, Zhenmeat, and Starfield.

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Tech Crunch
What if it was easier to eat salad than junk food? Most diet routines take a ton of time, whether you’re cooking from scratch, making a meal kit, or seeking out a nutritious restaurant. But on-demand prepared food delivery companies like Sprig that tried to eliminate that work have gone bankrupt from poor unit economics.

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Indian Express
At CES 2020 tech showcase in Las Vegas earlier this month, Impossible Foods, the California-based alternative meat producer, unveiled the “Impossible Pork”, a plant-based pork substitute that is kosher and halal, and which claims to have the taste, texture, and mouthfeel of the real thing. Also unveiled was the Impossible Sausage, a plant-based and pre-seasoned alternative to actual sausages.

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Reuters
WINNIPEG — Food company Nestle SA said on Friday it has teamed up with small Canadian plant-based food ingredient makers Burcon and Merit Functional Foods, the second such supply agreement this month that targets Canadian crops.

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Quartz
One of the leading Silicon Valley startups making high-tech, cell-cultured meat says it’s about to build the first pilot production plant in the United States.

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Inhabitat
Amidst the growing awareness about our planet’s climate crisis, there is now a burgeoning need for more sustainable food resources. In recent years, seaweed has been quite a catch for health-conscious consumers, in turn, making kelp, a brown macroalgae, one of the more in-demand types of seaweed offerings. As such, startup business AKUA is set to enhance the sustainability of the snack industry with its product line of kelp-based jerky and pasta.

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Food Ingredients First
Meat industry heavyweight Tyson Foods is creating the Coalition for Global Protein, a multi-stakeholder initiative to advance the future of alternative protein sources. Tyson Foods is convening leaders from the global protein industry, which includes all forms of protein, alongside academia, non-governmental organizations and financial institutions this week at Davos, Switzerland, at the 50th World Economic Forum Annual Meeting.

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The Spoon
Today Stockholm, Sweden-based Noquo Foods announced it had raised a €3.25 million ($3.6 million USD) seed round. Investors included VC firms Astanor Ventures, Northzone, Inventure, Purple Orange Ventures, and Creandum. Henry Asanto, CEO of mushroom-based vegan food line Quorn, and a handful of angel investors also participated.

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Pennsylvania State University
A novel composite film — created by the bonding of an antimicrobial layer to conventional, clear polyethylene plastic typically used to vacuum-package foods such as meat and fish — could help to decrease foodborne illness outbreaks, according to researchers in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences.

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Veg News
The California Plant Based Alliance will ensure that the state — home to popular companies such as Beyond Meat, Impossible Foods, and Miyoko’s Kitchen — will lead the way to a plant-based future.

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Associated Press
TOPEKA – Kansas lawmakers are considering a bill that would prohibit producers of meat alternatives from using certain meat-related terms, such as jerky or burger, in their marketing.

Editor’s Note: The labelling of plant-based foods is a contentious issue. Associated Press looks at a potential new development in this space coming out of the Midwest.

Vox
There’s a rhythm to plant-based meat offerings at fast-food and casual dining restaurants. First, a new company announces a plant-based offering with much fanfare and, often, lines out the door.

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The Guardian
Choosing a healthy and environmentally aware diet is a modern problem. Well-intentioned people are puzzled. Should we pick up “plant chicken pieces” that come from a factory in Holland, or a leg of grass-fed British lamb? Which is the better choice for both personal and planetary health?

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The Spoon
Creator, the San Francisco restaurant featuring robot-made hamburgers, announced today that it is now open five days a week, and that it has added a plant-based burger to its menu.

Editor’s Note: Plant-based food made by robots? The Spoon looks at the pros and cons of this initiative from Creator in te Bay Area..

Associated Press
RICHMOND – As people drink less dairy milk and some turn to plant-based alternatives such as oat, soy and almond milk, dairy farmers say they’re struggling. That’s why Virginia is the latest state to advance legislation restricting the use of the word milk for marketing purposes.

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Clean Technica
Go big, or go home. This cliche could serve well in the alternative meat scene, where scaling up production and consumption could make all the difference for our planet. If the goal is the large-scale change of eating habits, why not “go big” and take on… say … the food service industry?

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Axios
The state of play: Zak Weston, a foodservice analyst at The Good Food Institute, says both businesses benefit when fast-food chains partner with plant-based “meat” companies, such as start-up Impossible Foods and Lightlife Foods, which is operated by Canadian company Maple Leaf Foods.

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Grist
I’ve been thinking back to just a few years ago: It was a simpler time, when, at a nice family dinner, my conservative dad could reasonably scoff at the veggie option on the menu, and I, a worldly college sophomore, could reasonably look down my nose at the menu’s meat. It was an era of balance and harmony, when animal and plant proteins fit neatly into their own categories, and God looked down on it, and it was good.

Editor’s Note: Where do we draw a line between real meat and fake meat? Zoe Sayler compares the key similarities and differences.

Associated Press
If you’ve never heard of jackfruit, keep your eyes open: You’ll start noticing it everywhere. Jackfruit is a very large tropical fruit often used as a meat substitute. It packs some nutritional wallop, and the fact that you can cook, chunk or shred it like chicken or pork makes it a go-to main ingredient in many vegetarian and vegan dishes.

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CNBC
A protestor walks past a caricature made of coffee cups outside of the Starbucks Annual Shareholders Meeting at McCaw Hall, on March 21, 2018 in Seattle, Washington.

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Engineering and Technology
With sales of chicken rising in Britain, the environmental pressure group warned of the hidden climate impact of raising the birds, whose feed is mainly grown in South America. This means rising consumption could further endanger rainforests, which are already shrinking by millions of hectares each year.

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Reason
This is just the latest petty development in what is an ugly, mostly partisan dance.

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Rappler
Manila – Most of us are familiar with MSG – typically in the form of a granular, multi-purpose seasoning that comes in either packs or shakers; it’s salty, savory, and controversial, perceived as “unhealthy” or “unsafe.”

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