#20
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  • Plum pickings (#1)
  • ‘Lickable screen’ (#12)
  • Where’s the flour? (#8)
  • EU’s farm to fork strategy (#20)


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University of Queensland

A little-known indigenous fruit, which is one of the earliest-known plant foods eaten in Australia, could be the next big thing in bush foods.


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In recent times, a lot of food items have been touted as the next big thing in the industry. Here, researchers from the University of Queensland highlight the potential of something you might not have heard of, Australia’s green plum.

Food Business News

KANSAS CITY — The burgeoning plant-based movement may accelerate in a marketplace radically altered by pandemic, as meat processing plants temporarily shutter due to worker illness, spurring shortages of beef, pork and poultry.


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Your Story

Digital technology has empowered farmers with access to information and markets, streamlined supply chains, provided tools for food safety and security, and more.


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Food Ingredients First

The space of bioprotection has seen renewed interest in novel fermented cultures solutions. Suppliers are breaking new ground in the plant-based sector, where tectonic shifts in consumer appetite are heating up demand for specialized probiotic cultures designed for the dairy-free market.


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New Food Magazine

The National Beef Association has called on the UK government to “take food security seriously” amid concerns that amendments to the Agriculture Bill do not protect or prioritise UK food standards.


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Media Post

For marketers of animal-protein alternatives like Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods, marketing gains made during COVID-19 could be seen as one step forward, two steps back.


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Business Times (Singapore)

For the hamburger lover teetering between the joy of a juicy meat patty and a niggling guilt over greenhouse gases and slaughtered cows, the Impossible burger seems like the best of both worlds. It allows you to enjoy that beefy mouth feel, succulence of marbled fat and burst of blood-mixed juices that medium-rare cooking elicits – with the full knowledge that no animal was harmed in the making of your lunch.


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The Conversation

Extreme shortages of toilet paper, pasta and other pantry products defined the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic for many shoppers around the world. Availability of most these goods has returned to normal.


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Food Navigator USA

“Gut feelings” often form the foundation of startups, but to scale a business successfully, especially in times of crisis, entrepreneurs need more than that – they need data that shows where their brand fits in the competitive landscape and where consumers are headed so they can pivot as needed to remain relevant.


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The Conversation

As the coronavirus reaches developing countries in Africa and Asia, the pandemic will have effects beyond public health and economic activity. As the disease wreaks its havoc in areas poorly equipped to handle its spread, terrorism likely will increase there as well.


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Financial Times ($)

Tim Hayward explores what Britain’s hospitality sector could look like in the wake of coronavirus


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Digital Trends

Apple’s late co-founder and CEO Steve Jobs famously said about the bulbous and colorful iMac G3 that he wanted a computer that looked good enough to lick. But he probably didn’t mean it quite as literally as Homei Miyashita, a researcher at Japan’s Meiji University. Miyashita recently created a handheld “lickable screen” that he claims is capable of re-creating every flavor found in food.


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We are still a ways away from digital schnozberries tasting like schnozberries, though Homei Miyashita says he has taken a step towards that. Luke Dormehl speaks to him about his Norimaki Synthesizer here.

Straits Times

Thanks to heightened awareness about food sustainability issues, young people are relooking their diets, food sources and purchasing patterns.


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Reuters

Vegan businesses could be headed for leaner times. Meat substitutes are currently enjoying a spectacular boom driven by changes in tastes and problems in meat providers’ supply chains. It may not last.


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Food Ingredients First

Plant-based cheese, ready meals, seafood and alternatives to eggs are among the most significant opportunities in the plant-based arena, a major survey of over 6,000 consumers has revealed. Food awareness organization ProVeg International recently surveyed consumers across nine European countries to identify priorities for product improvement and development, based on consumers’ experience of purchasing and consuming plant-based products.


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Forbes

Fancy a burger made from meat grown in a laboratory? Lab-burgers are coming to a supermarket or restaurant near you soon and are going to be big business, predicts entrepreneur and author Paul Cuatrecasas.


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Channel News Asia

How is it different from being vegetarian? Will it really improve your health and fitness? CNA Lifestyle talked to health experts to find out if you should go on one.


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Reuters

Nestle (NESN.S) said on Monday it would appeal a Dutch court’s ruling that prohibits the Swiss food giant from selling its plant-based burgers in Europe under the “Incredible Burger” name after a challenge from U.S.-based Impossible Foods.


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Euractiv

The EU’s new Farm to Fork strategy is a good start towards a ‘just transition’ in European farming, but what will it mean for farmers in the Global South, asks Isabelle Brachet.


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Around the world, over 800 million people go to bed hungry every day. Isabelle Brachet hopes that the EU’s new farm-to-fork strategy will impact Europe but also make a major difference to the lives of farmers in the Global South.

Grit Daily

Listen up frequent travelers, travelers for work, or those who enjoy exploring the world. So, I guess that means everyone. The travel enthusiast who also misses the thought of being on a plane – things just got a whole lot better for you.


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CNet

How a newly minted unicorn, with investors like Oprah and Katy Perry, is making better produce through chemistry.


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ABC Tampa Bay

TAMPA – Tampa Bay area school districts are preparing to feed students through most of the summer months to continue ensuring students are fed through the COVID-19 crisis.


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Stuff NZ

OPINION: Rain – prolonged, solid rain – will at some point end Auckland’s current drought but the city must not make the mistake of going back to “normal.”


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Oxford Mail

The Bill will replace the Common Agriculture Policy with a new system for paying farmers ‘public money for public goods’. Food production will be central to this, as it should be. But the ground-breaking part of the legislation is that farmers will also be able to be paid for improving our environment: amongst other things, receiving money to improve our air quality, our water quality, to protect our biodiversity or improve our soil.


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CTech

Within today’s food supply system, slaughterhouses are particularly dangerous and unhealthy environments that often employ minority and undocumented workers who do not know their rights or are too afraid of possible reprisals to exercise them. It is these abattoirs that are one of the food supply chain’s weakest links, as they are especially vulnerable to disruptions during crises like the current pandemic.


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