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The Conversation
The world is facing a major food crisis where both obesity and hunger are rising in the context of rapidly changing environments. The Food and Agriculture Organization has presented alternative food sources — such as seaweed and insects — as possible solutions to this crisis.

Editor’s Note: Ever wondered what kind of food could we be eating in the future? A team of researchers at the University of Guelph looked at the possibilities, including what role insects could play.

Stuff
Stuff journalist Anuja Nadkarni and visual journalist Abigail Dougherty travelled to India to investigate the opportunities for New Zealand businesses in the massive market.

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Engadget
By 2050 there will be an estimated 10 billion humans living on this planet. That’s not just a lot of mouths to feed, those folks will be, on average, wealthier than today’s population with a taste for the foods found in regions like the US and Western Europe. We simply don’t have the capability, the land or production resources to ensure that many people can eat a cheeseburger whenever the mood strikes. Luckily, researchers from around the globe are working on alternative protein sources to supplement our existing beef, pork and chicken.

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Business Insider
Mushrooms were once an uncommon food in Syria, but they have become a vital resource in one refugee camp where families can’t afford meat. In 2016, a Syrian nonprofit began cultivating mushrooms and giving them out to civilians to use as a meat substitute. The price of meat has skyrocketed 650% in Syria since civil war broke out in 2011. Around 9 million Syrians needed emergency food assistance in 2019 – nearly half of the country’s population. View more episodes of Business Insider Today on Facebook.

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Economic Times (Times of India)
The high-profile Oscar season pre-party is all set to go vegan this year. This is in solidarity with best actor nominee and longtime vegan Joaquin Phoenix, the buzz is that the menu will include burgers, spaghetti and meatballs and a range of other plant-based dishes for the A-list Hollywood celebrities.

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USA Today
We like pigs just as much as the next person, but we don’t think they are capable of magic. However, the National Pork Producers Council begs to differ. Their director of science and technology, Dan Kovich, has claimed that it is “impossible … to make pork from plants.”

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Supermarket News
As consumer acceptance of CBD and plant-based alternatives continues to swell, retailers are enthusiastically embracing both of these relatively recent categories, according to a report from IRI that was presented at the FMI Midwinter Conference.

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Gizmodo
Tim Hortons, Canada’s largest coffee chain, has stopped selling Beyond Meat’s plant-based products after just seven months in a sign that some consumers aren’t ready to swap all their meat-based sandwiches and burgers for vegetarian alternatives.

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Food Business News
BOSTON — Motif FoodWorks is teaming up with researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst to streamline the formulation process for plant-based proteins.

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Reuters
SINGAPORE – Shiok Meats, a Singapore-based start-up whose name means very good in local slang, aims to become the first company in the world to bring shrimp grown in a laboratory to diners’ plates.

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The Namibian
It is no secret that the odds against meat are stacking up. Our beloved kapana is under attack, globally more so than locally, but perhaps not for very long. Slowly but surely the wheels of dietary change are turning, away from meat and dairy and toward plants.

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Food Ingredients First
EU-funded project Protein2Food is showcasing the final results of a five-year project that introduces new plant-based food and beverage prototypes developed toward accelerating “Europe’s protein transition.”

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Digital Journal
With the plant-based market now valued at $4.5 billion, and more food retailers offering meat alternatives, this shift poses new considerations for food safety in the supply chain. To keep up with high consumer demand, the organic supply chain must innovate to track inventory, provide transparency into its plant-based products and maintain food safety compliance.

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The Atlantic
A viral claim that plant burgers would make men grow breasts plays into long-held beliefs about power and sex.

Editor’s Note: Different forms of meat are of course entering a world where in many cultures, the idea of “meat” carries its own connotations. Here James Hamblin looks at the issue of meat and gender for The Atlantic.

Reuters
Burger King, saying it never billed its “Impossible Whoppers” as vegan or promised to cook them a particular way, said a proposed class action by a vegan customer over the plant-based patties being cooked on the same grills as meat burgers should be thrown out.

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The Crimson
Veggie Grill is a vegetarian restaurant chain based in California, which seeks to bring a new take on comfort food to Harvard Square.

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Vox
KFC is one of the most notorious American food brands in animal rights circles — but the latest KFC news is something animal welfare supporters should cheer.

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Newsweek
Eating meat has been linked to heart disease in the latest study to suggest the food could pose some risk to our health.

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The Spoon
If you watched the Super Bowl yesterday, you may have noticed a particular ad vying for your attention between plays. The Center for Consumer Freedom (CCF), a lobbying agency, made a commercial claiming that laxatives were used in plant-based meat.

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Open Democracy
For a Finnish researcher, it was gratifying to see a local scientific breakthrough receive international attention. The technology that allows protein to be grown “out of thin air” in a laboratory was created under the auspices of two public research institutions, and subsequently spun out as a tech company.

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UPI
The unveiling of Impossible Foods’ latest product — “Impossible Pork” — has drawn American pork producers into a years-long battle waged by the beef industry to stop plant-based companies from calling their foods some sort of meat.

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Business Green
Tyson Foods, the world’s second-largest meat processor, is convening a new Coalition for Sustainable Protein in a bid to collaborate with the rest of the protein industry so as to sustainably increase global protein supply.

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Adweek
Plant-based meat alternatives — like Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat, both of which exploded in popularity last year — seem to have hit a nerve in the meat industry.

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University of Maine
Mary Ellen Camire has some good news about french fries.

Editor’s Note: Should french fries by “whitish” instead of golden brown. Researchers at the University of Maine looked at the levels of potentially dangerous chemicals in fries, as well as ways to make them better.

Fast Company
“You’ve eaten Compass food, you just didn’t know it was Compass,” says the company’s North America CEO, Gary Green. He’s probably right: Under some two dozen brands and companies, the Compass Group serves millions of meals a day at its cafeterias at schools, stadiums, museums, and corporate and government offices nationwide. Compass has been wielding its enormous reach to introduce new food brands and concepts into the mainstream — and prove that sustainability can scale in the food industry.

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