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  • Price war in plant-based meat
  • Coronavirus boosts frozen food consumption
  • Cooking vegan meat at home?
  • New technology to reduce salt intake
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The Guardian
In the low-lying Gelderse Valley some 85km east of Amsterdam, a Dutch university is changing how humans eat.

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Food Business News
Legume burgers that sizzle and bleed like beef. Cashew cheese that melts and stretches like mozzarella. Oat milk that froths in a latte or churns into ice cream.

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University of Illinois
Being distracted by technology during mealtimes may decrease the amount of food a person eats, nutrition scientists suggest in a new study.

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The New York Times
Texture, appearance and flavor: These are the elements of meat that the new vegan alternatives from Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat are trying to capture, with varying degrees of success. Here’s how they do it.

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Business Insider
As the coronavirus spreads, people across the world are preparing for the possibility of forced quarantines, including shutdowns of businesses and services.

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Media Post
The plant-based meat substitute category is in full competitive cook-off mode, with Impossible Foods cutting its wholesale pricing by 15% in the face of growing competition from legacy food companies and private-label products from Kroger, Cargill and Sysco.

Editor’s Note: With all the products popping up, the plant-based food industry is bracing for a price war. Steve Ellwanger analyses the price cuts announced recently in this piece for Media Post.

The Conversation
Most people in the UK are committed meat eaters – but for how long? My new research into the views of meat eaters found that most respondents viewed veganism as ethical in principle and good for the environment.

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Reuters
Impossible Foods on Tuesday announced an average 15% cut in prices of its vegan products sold to U.S. distributors as the plant-based meat maker tries to make its patties more affordable to compete better with beef.

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The New York Times
When astronauts head for Mars, perhaps sometime in the 2030s, there is a good chance that they will be growing their own vegetables to eat along the way.

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Eater
Vegans can choose between Persian-style ramen, almond-based mac and cheese, and mushrooms in vodka sauce at the new all-vegan food cart pod coming soon to Cully.

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The Spoon
Colorado-based Planterra Foods announced a new plant-based brand today. Called OZO, the brand will include a line of meatless burgers, grounds, and meatballs. And here’s the kicker: Planterra Foods is owned by the U.S. branch of JBS, the Brazilian corporation that processes the largest amount of meat in the world.

Editor’s Note: JBS is one of the largest food processing companies in the world. Here, Catherine Lamb reviews the company’s latest venture in the field of plant-based burgers.

Food Navigator USA
Coronavirus will boost consumption of shelf-stable and frozen packaged foods in the near-term as consumers pantry-load ahead of what could be a large-scale outbreak, predicts a new report from analysts at Bernstein.

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The Guardian
Greggs made record profits in 2019, the year that it launched its popular vegan sausage roll, but the Newcastle-based company said the storms and flooding that battered Britain in recent weeks have put the brakes on sales.

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The Boston Globe
Must it be crunchy, salty, sweet, or chewy? Or can it have any attributes at all, so long as it is “a light meal: food eaten between regular meals,” as the Merriam-Webster definition would have it?

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Food Navigator USA
Kite Hill – best known for its dairy-free cheeses, yogurts, dips, and filled pastas – is expanding into a new category with a plant-based butter alternative featuring almondmilk as the #2 ingredient, that will launch nationally in Whole Foods this summer.

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Bloomberg
A San Francisco-based startup making imitation eggs from mung beans is fielding a wave of inquiries from some of China’s bigger food manufacturers.

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The Financial Times ($)
Plant-based meat substitute sales grew 18 per cent in the US last year to almost $1bn amid increasing consumer interest in alternative proteins.

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Fast Company
“How much chicken do you get in one order?” I ask Ross Mackay, before it took a solid beat for me to register that his product, of course, is not chicken. It is, in fact, the anti-chicken. As the marketing materials boldly state, it’s “1000% not chicken.”

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Washington State University
Eating too much salt can have significant negative health implications, and modern processed food typically contains high levels of salt to improve taste and preservation.

Editor’s Note: Do you ever wish whether you could maintain the salt in your diet without suffering from the side effects? Researchers from Washington State University have found a new way of reducing your intake without having an impact on taste.

The New York Times
Good morning. J. Kenji López-Alt has a fascinating story on the cover of The Times’s food section this week, a look back at his two-and-a-half years of experimentation with cooking plant-based protein mixes designed to taste, look and feel like ground meat. Vegan meat, he calls this stuff, made mostly by two companies, Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat.

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Fox Business
Snoop Dogg has gotten in on the meat replacement trend with an investment in a snack food company that makes “pigless pork rinds.”

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Bloomberg
Impossible Foods Inc., maker of the eponymous soy-based burger, will probably have trouble keeping production ahead of demand, despite bouncing back from a major shortage over the summer.

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Citizen
Some would call veganism an imitation game, filled with faux sausages and chicken nuggets posing as their protein-rich meat-based counterparts. But that’s not completely accurate.

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Newsweek
Ash Wednesday ushers the start of Lent, a six-week period where Christians prepare for Easter through prayer and reflection. For Catholics, the season also involves fasting on certain days and abstaining from meat on Fridays. The tradition, which started in the early church, is something that Catholics, and many Christians in general, have prescribed to for centuries.

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Food Ingredients First
Givaudan is increasing the appeal of meat substitutes and adding tangible wellness benefits to food products through plant-based concepts that cater to current consumer demands.

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