#11
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  • Kawasaki-like disease (#1)
  • Organ transplant rules (#19)
  • Sick chinchillas (#3)
  • Repairing frog brains (#22)


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Al Jazeera

More and more cases of a Kawasaki-like disease, called PMIS or MIS-C, reported among children exposed to coronavirus.


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The last several weeks have seen the emergence of worries over an ailment similar to Kawasaki disease. While answers have been tough to find, here Colin Baker goes in depth for Al Jazeera and spoke to researchers around the world trying to understand what is known as PMIS/MIS-C.

The Economist ($)

Nabbing a disease hotspot is to epidemic control what locking up a serial perpetrator is to crime investigation. Success hinges on similar skills, as John Snow, an Englishman who drew up the principles of modern epidemiology, demonstrated in 1854. That year a cholera outbreak in central London killed more than 500 people in just two weeks. Snow investigated around 60 of those deaths and found a common factor: a contaminated water pump. Removing its handle ended the outbreak


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Science

Biomedical researchers rely on chinchillas–docile South American rodents with ears strikingly similar to those of humans—for studies of ear infections and hearing loss. But the two main U.S. chinchilla suppliers to research labs have for years violated the U.S. Animal Welfare Act, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), which enforces that law. Until the pandemic descended, the two suppliers sent hundreds of animals to U.S. labs.


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New York Times

In a medical research project nearly unrivaled in its ambition and scope, volunteers worldwide are rolling up their sleeves to receive experimental vaccines against the coronavirus — only months after the virus was identified.


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Nature

Scientists across the country are battling anti-science sentiment alongside a rapid increase in COVID-19 cases.


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Indian Express

Studies over the years have sought to quantify the infection risk. Here, we look at two recent ones — neither study, however, looks specifically at the coronavirus pandemic.


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STAT News

Less than 1% of Americans live in nursing homes, yet these facilities account for between 15% and 25% of Covid-19 cases and half of all deaths from the disease in some states; in Minnesota, nursing home residents and workers account for 81% of all Covid-19 deaths.


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The impact of COVID has fallen in many places, but few places harder than nursing homes. Here Donald H. Taylor of Duke University argues that they should be the focus of testing efforts.

World Bank

Lives and livelihoods can be saved when they are established and operationalized.


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New York Times

Dr. Shet is the director of child health at the International Vaccine Access Center at Johns Hopkins.


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The Conversation

At least 55 countries have ordered large supplies of the anti-malarial drugs Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and Chloroquine (CQ) from India, manufacturer of 70% of the world’s HCQs, to treat COVID-19 patients.


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UT Southwestern Medical Center

Scientists have known for a decade that cells that fuse with others to perform their essential functions — such as muscle cells that join together to make fibers — form long projections that invade the territory of their fusion partners. But how the thin and floppy polymers involved in this process propel mechanically stiff protrusions has been unknown.


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The Hill

This past week the U.S. meatpacking industry hit grim milestones in the American COVID-19 epidemic with over 15,000 infections and 60 deaths tied to meatpacking facilities, and the nation has now turned its attention to this largely forgotten industry.


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Asian News International

Singapore has started to re-open some but limited businesses and social activities ahead of the official “circuit breaker” end date of June 1


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Scientific American

Scientists urge caution over hints of success emerging from small human and animal studies


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NY Mag

Breathe in, hoping that this next lungful is clear of noxious droplets. Breathe out so that whatever microbes you harbor dissipate in the breeze. Breathe in and figure that, if some unfortunate carrier coughed in the elevator you just entered, the virus will probably have escaped through the doors or settled on the floor.


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The Guardian

Public health experts have warned about the risks of low supplies of coronavirus test kits as lockdowns in African countries begin to ease and urban populations become more mobile.


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As the world scrambled to get enough testing kits, some countries have been left waiting for weeks. Here Emmanuel Akinwotu of the Guardian compares the situation among West African countries.

NJ.com

Testing along with contact tracing and follow-up and resource support are essential components in the fight against COVID-19 and specifically for bending the curve of transmission and New Jersey’s community colleges can play a role. Recently, Gov. Phil Murphy stated New Jersey will “likely need at least 1,000 dedicated contact tracers” for reopening efforts.


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Inverse

Scientists are moving at warp speed toward the same goal: creating an effective Covid-19 vaccine. But just manufacturing an effective vaccine may not be enough to curb Covid-19. We’ll have to market it effectively.


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The Hill

The health care system in the richest country on earth is bending in the midst of a global pandemic because of enormous strain on hospitals and frontline staff.


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The Hindu

Mask use, mask etiquette, and mask maintenance can go a long way in our fight against COVID-19


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Star Tribune

In the rush to deploy as many COVID-19 tests as possible, important nuances are being lost about which kinds of tests are not worth doing, causing waste and potential harm during a pandemic.


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Tufts University

Researchers led by biologists at Tufts University have discovered that the brains of developing frog embryos damaged by nicotine exposure can be repaired by treatment with certain drugs called “ionoceuticals” that drive the recovery of bioelectric patterns in the embryo, followed by repair of normal anatomy, gene expression and brain function in the growing tadpole. The research, published today in Frontiers in Neuroscience, introduces intervention strategies based on restoring the bioelectric “blueprint” for embryonic development, which the researchers suggest could provide a roadmap for the exploration of therapeutic drugs to help repair birth defects.


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Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare

According to the findings, for kidney transplantations there is a correlation between the volume of services and the quality of treatment results: In hospitals with larger case volumes, the survival probabilities are higher up to one year after transplantation. No correlation between the volume of services and the quality of treatment results can be inferred for the outcome “transplant failure”


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Business Insider

They are urging Sweden to test more so it can better understand its outbreak and give information to the rest of the world.


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Daily Nation (Kenya)

Covid-19 belongs to a group of other coronaviruses, and sometimes the antibody test may lack specificity, Dr Amoth noted.


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