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  • Blood vessel attacks (#2)
  • Genomics + COVID (#15)
  • Corona in Italy (#8)
  • Superspreaders (#19)


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NBC News

“I saw nothing better I could do to give back to people like my mom, my dad,” Kentez Craig said.


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Science

Frank Ruschitzka told his pathologist to be ready before the first COVID-19 patient died. In early March, Ruschitzka, who leads the cardiology department at University Hospital Zürich, noticed that patients with the disease had strange symptoms for what was then thought to be chiefly a respiratory infection. Many patients had acute kidney failure, organ damage, and mysterious blood clots. Several weeks later, the first body was autopsied: Tiny clots and dead cells littered the capillaries of the lungs, and inflammation had distended blood vessels supplying every organ in the body.


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While COVID has been known as a respiratory disease, research has uncovered more and more aspects to it. Here Science reports on vascular issues and their relation to acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Times of Israel

As he readied them for collection, he spoke to The Times of Israel about how his sabbatical in Israel turned in to a frantic race to conduct research on protecting people from coronavirus — and said he has “no doubt” that efforts will end with success.


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The Citizen (South Africa)

It’s understandable that many women are worried about what will happen when they’re ready to give birth. While hospitals and staff are gearing up to cope with the worst of the SARS-CoV-2 or Covid-19 crises, we’re told that maternity units will continue to function as usual.


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CNBC

Michael Seres was a prominent “e-patient,” who reminded the medical community that patients need to be included in the conversation.


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Science

Amy Boland has gone through many ups and downs since she noticed lumps under her arms 12 years ago and learned she had cancer of the lymph system. For about 6 years, conventional chemotherapy helped shrink her lymphoma tumors, but they started to grow again. A succession of other cancer therapies, including a bone marrow transplant and a class of drugs called checkpoint inhibitors, either failed or only brought temporary relief. In one elaborate effort, physicians harvested her T cells, engineered those immune cells to kill her lymphoma, and infused them back into her body. The cancer vanished, but 2 years later bounced back. “Nothing was really working,” says oncologist Stephen Schuster of the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn).


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Press Trust of India

A sero-survey involves testing of blood serum of a group of individuals for the presence of antibodies against that infection to know who has been infected in the past and has now recovered.


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Elemental (Medium)

Lack of coordination and trust caused trouble for the country’s response to the pandemic


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STAT News

The Covid-19 pandemic has upended the normal ways of doing everything from going to school to making sure countries have the medications their citizens need. It has also exposed vulnerabilities in the global medicine supply chain, leading to uncertainty, drug shortages, quality issues, and price volatility.


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The future of medicine on some level will depend on the future of medical supply chains. Here Anthony Lakavage argues about U.S. dependence on supplies made outside the country.

Healio

Let’s start with what we currently know about COVID-19, an illness caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, also known as SARS-CoV-2. It is a single-stranded RNA virus transmitted primarily by respiratory droplets from coughs and sneezes.


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Associated Press

Tight control on information and competition within Chinese public health system to blame, AP finds


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The Guardian

When Noopur Raje’s husband fell critically ill with Covid-19 in mid-March, she did not suspect that she too was infected with the virus.


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USA Today

BOSTON – People with cancer are far more likely to die from COVID-19 than the general population, though for the same basic reasons – because of their older age, male gender, smoking history and multiple health problems, according to a study published Thursday in The Lancet.


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Newsweek

The coronavirus that causes COVID-19 may not have originated from a wet market in the central Chinese city of Wuhan, the original epicenter of the pandemic, according to a study.


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Nature

Scientists in New Zealand, the United Kingdom and other places are using sequence data to track new infections as lockdowns ease.


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Contact tracing has become key to fighting the pandemic, but genomics could make it better, particularly in places where things are more under control. Here Clare Watson looks at how it differs from country to country.

Reuters

LONDON/CHICAGO – The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic may be waning. For vaccine developers, that could be a problem.


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USA Today

Universal testing in the United States may be on the way, but it is not around the corner. Acknowledging that regrettable reality means that, in the meantime, we have to decide how to allocate wisely our scarce testing resources. Unfortunately, with limitations on testing we seem to be testing the wrong people for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.


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UC Riverside

The scientists, led by Maurizio Pellecchia in the School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside, report in the journal Molecules that two proteases — enzymes that break down proteins — located on the surface of host cells and responsible for processing viral entry could be inhibited. Such protease inhibition would prevent SARS-CoV2, the coronavirus responsible for COVID-19, from invading the host cell.


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Financial Times ($)

In the early 1880s, Irishwoman Mary Mallon emigrated to New York and began working as a cook. Her meals came with a side order of typhoid: as an asymptomatic carrier of the disease, she infected about 50 people, three of whom died.


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MedPage

With the U.S. recently passing the milestone of 100,000 deaths from COVID-19, MedPage Today Editor-in-Chief Martin Makary, MD, of Johns Hopkins University, discusses reasons behind a potential spike in cases in our nation’s Sun Belt states, what China has taught us about the value of masks, and what vaccines and treatments in the pipeline are most exciting to him.


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Medscape

Ana Anselmo of Miami is no stranger to avoiding busy and public spaces for health reasons. She and her husband have regularly steered clear of both because their daughter Savannah was born with a rare disease that required her to get a lifesaving liver transplant at the age of 1.


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American Heart Association

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) affects American Indians and Alaska Natives at approximately three times the rate of white Americans and is closely linked to the disproportionately high rates of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and strokes, according to the American Heart Association Scientific Statement “Cardiovascular Health in American Indians and Alaska Natives,” published today in the Association’s flagship journal Circulation.


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The Conversation

According to a widely cited forecasting study, relaxed social distancing rules will lead to a two-fold increase in deaths from COVID-19. Predicting how much the mortality will increase, however, is fraught with huge uncertainties, as epidemiologists like me well know. That’s because the forecast relies on assumptions about what will happen in the future.


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UPI

More evidence has surfaced that the COVID-19 coronavirus was circulating in the United States as much as a month prior to the first confirmed local case in February, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday.


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ABC (Australia)

At the peak of the coronavirus crisis, Paul Armstrong was plunged into what he now refers to as “COVID time”.


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