#13
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  • Princeton’s “poisoned arrow” (#4)
  • COVID and maternal health (#13)
  • Dutch mink farms (#9)
  • The office elevator (#21)


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New York Times

The agency’s advice sometimes lags behind rapidly evolving research into the coronavirus, experts contend.


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RAND

In this report — one of several from a RAND Corporation team examining the role of commercial air travel in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic — we use our COVID-19 Air Traffic Visualization (CAT-V) tool to quantify potential vectors of COVID-19 transmission to the United States resulting from commercial air travel. The tool combines COVID-19 case data from Johns Hopkins University with detailed air travel data from the International Air Transport Association.


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CBC

‘I’m optimistic that this can save lives and get people back to work,’ says researcher


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Princeton University

Poison is lethal all on its own — as are arrows — but their combination is greater than the sum of their parts. A weapon that simultaneously attacks from within and without can take down even the strongest opponents, from E. coli to MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus).


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The presence of antibiotic-resistant “Gram-negative” bacteria is a major challenge for fighting disease. Here Princeton explains research that the scientists involved hope can improve the effectiveness of antibiotics.

Science

In the first big research scandal of the COVID-19 era, The Lancet and The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) today retracted two high-profile papers after a company declined to make the underlying data for both available for an independent audit, following questions being raised about the research. The Lancet paper, which claimed an antimalarial drug touted by President Donald Trump for treatment of COVID-19 could cause serious harm without helping patients, had had a global impact, halting trials of one of the drugs by the World Health Organization (WHO) and others.


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CNN

As the coronavirus death toll  in the US  tops 107,000, questions have intensified over what could have been done to avoid such a catastrophic loss of life.  Beyond criticism of President Donald Trump himself, scrutiny has fallen particularly hard on the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and its embattled director, Dr. Robert Redfield, whom Trump appointed to the job in 2018.


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STAT News

Even as Americans fight (and even kill) over the country’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic, there is no disagreement on one point: With 1.9 million cases and the death toll closing in on 110,000 as of June 5, for both economic and humanitarian reasons we absolutely cannot have a repeat of the tragedy that has unfolded since March. But with the current drop-off in cases, hospital admissions, and deaths likely to be followed sooner or later by local, regional, and possibly national resurgences, the implication is clear: If — or, more likely, when — those occur, we have to do better.


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Observer Research Foundation

COVID-19 has jolted the global discourse on public health into a rapid redo. To be or not to be is no longer a question or topic of debate for digital health. Embracing digital technology and data science for global health is the only way to reverse the pandemic in the short-term, and to make health systems combat-ready for the future ones.


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Science

LELYSTAD, THE NETHERLANDS—In a sad sideshow to the COVID-19 pandemic, authorities in the Netherlands began to gas tens of thousands of mink on 6 June, most of them pups born only weeks ago. SARS-CoV-2 has attacked farms that raise the animals for fur, and the Dutch government worries infected mink could become a viral reservoir that could cause new outbreaks in humans.


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Stuff NZ

When the word ‘coronavirus’ first came up in Marlborough, there were just a few thousand cases in China. It was mid-January. The wine industry had minor concerns about workers that might not be able to make it to vintage.


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As countries get coronavirus under control, they can begin to look back at what might have happened. Here Sophie Trigger tackles it on the local level and looks at a region that could have been particularly at risk because of its elderly population.

New York Times

Social isolation and unstructured days add to the anxiety of those struggling to achieve a healthy relationship with food.


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Inverse

As the new coronavirus was rapidly spreading in February and March 2020, many governments introduced stringent lockdown measures. Through a massive public effort, these countries have been successful at slowing the pandemic.


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Dawn

We must work together in this crisis and beyond to ensure that maternal and child health is not neglected now or later.


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The Conversation

Early in the outbreak, researchers estimated that a person carrying SARS-CoV-2 would, on average, infect another two to three people. More recent studies have argued, however, that this number may actually be higher.


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The Hindu

Transmission through surface contact is attributable to less than 5% of infections, says IIPH Director


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Boston University

Little evidence supports the new recommendations for clinical screening for drug use. Do the potential benefits outweigh the potential harms?


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STAT News

The very premature infant was born via cesarean section and quickly whisked away to the neonatal intensive care unit before his mother could even lay eyes on him. Over the next eight weeks, the only time she saw her baby was when the NICU staff sent photos, or when a nurse FaceTimed her while the baby was being bathed.


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One of the trickiest issues with the response to COVID has been the question of testing: when, who, where, etc. Here Helen Branswell digs into everything and the scientists that are critiquing how things are being done.

The Conversation

The rising temperatures that come with climate change present a global health challenge. There is scientific evidence that air pollution and hot weather increase the risk of cardiovascular disease hospital admissions – and may even end in death. Heart attacks, heart failure and abnormal heart rhythms are all examples of cardiovascular diseases. Evidence of the interaction between temperature and air pollution – and the combined effects on people’s health – is also growing.


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Nature

Artificial intelligence tools aim to tame the coronavirus literature Developers hope that tools for processing natural language will help biomedical researchers and clinicians to find the COVID-19 papers that they need. Matthew Hutson Matthew Hutson is a science writer based in New York City. Search for this author in: Pub Med Nature.com Google Scholar


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Kaiser Health News

When the American Medical Association moved its headquarters to a famous Chicago skyscraper in 2013, the floor-to-ceiling views from the 47th-floor conference space were a spectacular selling point.


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Euronews

A pandemic swept through the US and Europe in 1918 killing, by some estimates, more than 50 million people.


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University of Virginia Health System

What we eat can affect the outcome of chemotherapy – and likely many other medical treatments – because of ripple effects that begin in our gut, new research suggests.


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The Guardian

As Australia enters winter – the season of woollen jumpers and runny noses – there is fresh concerns over the country’s low level, yet persistent, community transmission of Covid-19.


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The Hindu

Health experts say medical professionals should treat every patient as a potential source of COVID-19, follow all protocols


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Medscape

Ana Anselmo of Miami is no stranger to avoiding busy and public spaces for health reasons. She and her husband have regularly steered clear of both because their daughter Savannah was born with a rare disease that required her to get a lifesaving liver transplant at the age of 1.


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