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  • Coronavirus carriers
  • Different strains
  • Hep C in HIV patients
  • More effective immunotherapy?


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The Conversation

The COVID-19 pandemic has already caused several thousand deaths, widespread health problems, massive anxiety and economic losses. Most people are concerned with what happens day by day as we wait for control measures to work.


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Rappler

Having the right data and understanding of what the data is trying to tell us can help our leaders and policymakers strike this needed balance


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Science

The coronavirus that for weeks had been crippling hospitals in her hometown of Seattle changed Jennifer Haller’s life on 16 March—but not because she caught it. Haller, an operations manager at a tech company in the city, became the first person outside of China to receive an experimental vaccine against the pandemic virus, and in the days since, she has been flooded by an outpouring of gratitude.


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Imperial College London

New cases of hepatitis C amongst HIV positive men in London and Brighton have fallen by nearly 70 per cent in recent years.


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USA Today

SAN FRANCISCO — At least eight strains of the coronavirus are making their way around the globe, creating a trail of death and disease that scientists are tracking by their genetic footprints.


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One of the questions about coronavirus, with implications for response, is the concept of different strains. Here Elizabeth Weise looks into the issue, as well as the dangers of “pretty” charts that you may remember seeing on Twitter.

The Conversation

We are in a partial lockdown state now, but it has been gradual. Different restrictions have been added on a rolling basis over a few weeks now, with schools still open. This is more of a slow trickle approach than a short, sharp, instant lockdown.


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The Hill

Today politicians, public health officials, and economists debate whether to roll back social distancing and other containment measures by Easter in order to open the economy. Our nation faced similar challenges in 1918. The start of the influenza pandemic began in March 1918, with more than 100 reported cases at Camp Funston in Fort Riley, Kansas. That pandemic, the worst in modern history, occurred in three waves, infecting a third of the world’s population and killing 50 million people, including 675,000 in the United States alone. The movement of troops at the end of World War I contributed to the spread of influenza, with the second wave in the fall of 1918 being the most deadly. The third wave subsided in the summer of 1919, 15 months later.


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The Lancet

Older adults are vulnerable at the onset of natural disasters and crisis, and this has been especially true during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. With the aggressive spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the death toll has risen worldwide. According to an interactive online tool that estimates the potential number of deaths from COVID-19 in a population, by age group, in individual countries and regional groupings worldwide under a range of scenarios, most of those who have died were older adults, most of whom had underlying health problems


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Project Syndicate

LONDON – So far, the health message has been clear – the older you are, the more at risk you are from the coronavirus. But the World Health Organisation (WHO) has warned young people not to view themselves as “invincible”.


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CBC

What materials are worst, how long the virus lasts, and how to protect yourself


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Bloomberg

Developing a vaccine or a treatment for a newly discovered virus is a painstakingly slow and detailed endeavor. Finding a compound that works, testing it in animals, and then rolling it out to clinical trials in humans can take years. And even the top experts in virology and epidemiology typically toil in obscurity, spending long, lonely hours in the lab and garnering fleeting interest only when an unknown ailment sparks headlines. The novel coronavirus has changed all that.


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Anadolu

India’s top virologist shares concerns, doubts about India’s strategy in fighting virus with Anadolu Agency


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Stanford University

Biologist Erin Mordecai discusses different social distancing strategies, how long we may need to maintain them and the risk of a disease resurgence if precautions are lifted too early.


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Beyond the treatments themselves, scientists are also looking at the effectiveness of responses such as quarantine. Here Stanford looks at modeling with biologist Erin Mordecai.

The Lancet

In a continued effort to curb the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), countries have been tightening borders and putting travel restrictions in place. These actions have affected refugees and migrants worldwide. The International Organization for Migration and UNHCR announced on March 10, 2020, that resettlement travel for refugees will be temporarily suspended, although the agencies have appealed to states to ensure emergency cases are exempted. The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted some countries to take steps towards further reducing population movement that affects humanitarian corridors around the world


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University of Illinois

Researchers have developed a triad of innovative tools to engineer low-pH-tolerant yeast Issatchenkia orientalis for production of valuable bioproducts from renewable biomass.


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USA Today

A series of errors with lab testing delayed the U.S. response to the Covid-19 pandemic. We need to be clear about what went wrong and how we can get things right.


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The New York Times

The C.D.C. director says new data about people who are infected but symptom-free could lead the agency to recommend broadened use of masks.


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Max Delbruck Center

In Blankenstein’s research group, scientists at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC) and from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin study specialized cells of the immune system called T cells. With his new research project Blankenstein wants to find out how T cells respond when their specific receptors detect a new antigen on a cancer cell. This line of research promises to identify more effective immunotherapy strategies for treating cancer.


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Seattle Times

Weeks after the fever, sweats and headaches from a nasty bout of COVID-19 were gone, Seattle freelance writer Christy Karras showed up for an appointment at a nearly deserted clinic in South Lake Union. Karras, who doesn’t like needles, averted her eyes as a technician collected 10 vials of her blood.


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NBC News

While the science behind whether masks can prevent a person from catching the coronavirus hasn’t changed (a mask does not help a healthy person avoid infection), public guidance may be shifting.


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NPR

When infectious pathogens have threatened the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been front and center. During the H1N1 flu of 2009, the Ebola crisis in 2014, and the mosquito-borne outbreak of Zika in 2015, the CDC has led the federal response.


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Speaking of models, the question looming over many in lockdown is what the future holds and when we get back to “normal.” Here CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield speaks to NPR’s Atlanta-based affiliate.

Reuters

SHANGHAI – As it eases its strict coronavirus curbs, China has urged authorities to pay more attention to asymptomatic cases, part of efforts to allay public fears that large numbers of infectious people have gone unreported.


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City University of Hong Kong

Human stem cells have been regarded as one of the promising cell sources for cardiac regeneration therapy. But their clinical use is hampered due to the poor performance after transplantation into failing hearts. Recently a stem cell biologist from City University of Hong Kong (CityU), together with his collaborators, has developed a novel strategy, called in vivo priming, to “train” the stem cells to stay strong after implantation to the damaged heart via the 3D-printed bandage-like patch. The positive results of the study show that an in vivo priming strategy can be an effective means to enhance cardiac repair.


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Malay Mail

Why is the current emphasis more for the public to practice social distancing rather than wearing a mask?


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Financial Express

COVID-19: What became known as Covid-19 started in late 2019 as a cluster of pneumonia cases with an unknown cause. The cause of the pneumonia was found to be a new virus – Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2, or SARS-CoV-2. The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV- 2) belongs to the family of Coronaviridae and genus betacoronavirus, comprising vertebrate respiratory viruses including HCoV-OC43, responsible for 10% cases of common cold.


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