#11
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  • China’s sharing economy (#4)
  • The publishing world (#14)
  • Survival of music clubs (#6)
  • World’s oldest profession (#15)


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New York Times

With short videos and paid newsletters, everyone from superstars to half-forgotten former athletes and even journalists can, as one tech figure put it, “monetize individuality.”


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Queensland Insitute of Technology

Hundreds of thousands of Australians are out of work as a result of COVID-19, but a QUT expert says some may find new jobs through digital platforms, particularly in areas like food delivery, writing, law, accountancy, home maintenance, IT or graphic design.


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The gig economy has seen job losses during the pandemic and its restrictions on the kind of work that can be done. Here, researchers in Australia discuss the findings of a survey and how gig work could actually expand, as well as start including more tech, creative and professional skills.

Inc42

The recovery of the sharing economy will vary according to the business model.


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Jing Daily

China’s sharing economy made major advancements over the past decade while helping to reshape the country’s domestic economy.


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RTE

They have been deemed “essential workers” during the Covid-19 pandemic, but the people who work in the gig economy, delivering food to our doors, do not enjoy the same employment benefits as other workers.


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Deustche Welle

With temperatures rising, May is typically the time of the year when festival season starts. But such events remain banned in Germany until at least August 31. How is the industry dealing with the COVID-19 crisis?


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Entrepreneur.com

If the sharing economy cannot deal with its fundamental vulnerabilities in a moment of crisis, it could spell the end of its meteoric rise as a business model.


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Financial Express

There is a pressing need to address the provision of social security benefits to gig workers in a sustainable manner, with roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders clearly and equitably defined.


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Forbes

When this crisis is studied from the lens of economic history, we will learn more about the winners and losers. Surely, though, we have good reason to know already that a significant group of losers have been gig economy workers.


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Reuters

The more than a century old car rental firm Hertz Global Holdings Inc filed for bankruptcy protection yesterday after its business was decimated during the coronavirus pandemic and talks with creditors failed to result in much needed relief.


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Car rentals were a sort of sharing economy well before anyone ever heard of apps. As Mike Spector reports, however, Hertz has filed for bankruptcy after the pandemic added even more pressure on top of competition from companies like Uber.

The Denver Post

Unemployment benefits are a lifeline keeping hundreds of thousands of Coloradan above water as the coronavirus drives unprecedented economic pain in the Centennial State and across the country.


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Press Trust of India

Ola and Uber cabs may be back on road but their drivers, resuming work after 50 days of the lockdown, are not a happy lot as business is low and they have to shell out additional cost of sanitisers and disinfectants.


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New York Times

With over 38 million U.S. unemployment claims in nine weeks, one economist says the situation is “grimmer than we thought.”


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HuffPost

Quarantine may be a golden opportunity to finally read “War and Peace” — but it’s not an easy time for the book industry.


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CNN

Don’t kiss. Tell clients to wash their hands before they touch you. Wear a mask. Avoid face-to-face positions. And even: Put on a nurse costume and pull out a thermometer — if his temperature is normal, make it part of the game. If he has a fever, end the session.


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Arkansas Democrat Gazette

An Arkansas website created to process unemployment claims for gig economy workers, independent contractors and the self-employed was back up and running Wednesday, after having been shuttered for several days by state officials because of security concerns.


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Washington Post

More than 38 million people have filed for unemployment. Hundreds of thousands of new gig jobs have become available from businesses including Amazon, DoorDash, Instacart and Shipt, a delivery app acquired by Target.


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Protocol

On May 7, Jersey City capped delivery app fees charged to restarurants at 10%, instead of the typical 15% to 30% many such platforms take. The next day, Uber Eats added a $3 delivery fee to local orders for customers and reduced the delivery radius of Jersey City’s restaurants.


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Radio NZ

People looking to buy, or sell, a house are starting to dip their toes back into the market under the lighter restrictions.


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AirBnb and the way it affects housing prices make regular appearances in this newsletter. Here a piece from New Zealand looks at short-term stays being converted into more traditional, longer-term apartments after looking at what to do with their properties post-COVID.

The Jerusalem Post

Despite the initial challenges and organizational teething problems, remote work and Zoom meetings have become the new normal within just a few months.


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Your Story

Bengaluru startup FloCareer offers Interviews-as-a-Service, remote hiring, and more. It has conducted over 25,000 interviews for corporates with its SaaS model.


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Chicago Business

The digital dynamo, once betting big on the city, is retrenching, and trying to take Chicago’s brightest tech star with it.


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New Yorker

With each passing day, the strip club in downtown Manhattan grew a little emptier. Fewer customers were drinking premium liquor and eating steaks in the plush banquettes; fewer patrons were sitting at the edge of the blue-lit stage; fewer clients were throwing dollar bills at the dancers performing on poles or in their laps. “It felt weird. There was an air of desperation almost,” Nico, a dancer at the club, told me.


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NY Magazine

Restaurants continue to reel from the devastating impact of the coronavirus. The ones that have remained open have become even more reliant on the handful of online platforms that dominate the food delivery landscape — despite the fact that those platforms don’t really make any money themselves.


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CNet

For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.


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