#5
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  • Sex Work Comes Home (#3)
  • DoorDash for leftovers (#19)
  • Airbnb raises $1 billion (#4)
  • Tennis players as gig workers (#25)
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Associated Press
After Rich Cruse saw about $3,000 in income for his photography business quickly disappear to the coronavirus, he tried to apply for unemployment benefits in California. But like many states, his isn’t yet accepting claims from the self-employed like him.

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Law 360
In 2019, California enacted A.B. 5, a controversial law designed to make it more difficult for businesses to classify workers — including those providing services in the gig economy — as independent contractors.

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The New York Times
More of us are making and watching sexual performances online now. Fewer of us are paying.

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Bloomberg
On Monday, Airbnb Inc. announced it had raised $1 billion in debt and equity securities from Silver Lake, the tech buyout giant, and Sixth Street Partners.

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The Post and Courier
The tourists departed. The hotels emptied. The bustling bars along King Street fell quiet. And with that activity went nearly all of John Holland’s income.

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Indian Express
To ease the delivery of daily essentials here are some companies that have collaborated with grocery suppliers and food delivery services to supply and deliver orders in less time.

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News.com.au
The $1500-a-fortnight JobKeeper package announced by the Federal Government will be approved by parliament today as the nation scrambles to soften the economic blow caused by COVID-19.

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Novara Media
Louise Dean has never worked on a farm before. A trained hairdresser, she’s more used to foils and fringes than planting or picking vegetables.

Editor’s Note: The ongoing transition towards freelancing and short-term gigs has been lauded by many, though opposition has gathered steam amid the pandemic. Here Sophie McKay looks back at the way things have changed over the last decade

ZDNet
Ever since I picked up a copy of Thomas Friedman’s The Lexus and the Olive Tree nearly 20 years ago, I’ve been convinced that globalization is here to stay. But the idea has been under fire recently, blamed for everything from job loss to income inequality to immigration — a backlash that has flared up before (think Brexit or other previous nationalist-type movements) but is now raging with the coronavirus and the fears that come with seeing supply chains seize up, public events canceled, and governments move to close borders and restrict travel.

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The Hindu Business Line
On March 24, 2020, the world of work changed in our country. The 21-day lockdown started in India. Since then, I have heard of virtual job interviews, virtual farewells and virtual lay-offs. Even virtual funerals and weddings.

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NY Mag
Weeks after Donald Trump’s victory in the 2016 election, the president-elect’s economic adviser Stephen Moore delivered some tough news to House Republicans: “Just as Reagan converted the GOP into a conservative party, Trump has converted the GOP into a populist, working-class party.”

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WSJ ($)
Everything was supposed to come together for Airbnb in 2020.

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New Straits Times
It is rather puzzling the fury of some critics railing against the government’s Prihatin Rakyat stimulus package announced by Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin.

Editor’s Note: Malaysia has announced various measures in order to keep the economy going during the COVID-19 crisis. John Teo wonders whether freelancers stand to benefit enough.

The Atlantic
When Ananay Arora looks off his balcony, he doesn’t see much these days. From his high-rise apartment, which he shared with three roommates before one of them moved back to Taiwan a few weeks ago, he has a view of Arizona State University’s campus, where Arora is currently a sophomore majoring in computer science.

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Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The government is set to report another shocking level of unemployment claims Thursday even after nearly 10 million people applied for benefits in the previous two weeks because of business shutdowns from the coronavirus. The number will likely keep increasing, in part because many states are still clearing out backlogs of applications for unemployment aid. And with more companies running through their cash cushions as the virus-related shutdowns persist, they are resorting to layoffs to save money.

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Business Insider
With the passage of the coronavirus stimulus package at the end of March, but the money not yet in the hands of individual Americans, now is the perfect time to decide how to use your stimulus check.

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FiveThirtyEight
The coronavirus crisis is testing almost every facet of American life, including the country’s social safety net. For generations politicians have proposed (and haggled over) ways to help people during a garden-variety recession. And in the past few weeks, Congress has tried to strengthen the safeguards that already exist, passing a series of bills to get government assistance and other protections to more people, including a $2 trillion relief package with several provisions that directly affect workers and small businesses.

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Star Tribune
When you think about it, the supportive communities of elder care centers can be thought of as a metaphor for healthy neighborhoods, towns, cities and workplaces.

Editor’s Note: Part of what has been affected by COVID is not just the work that we do, but the way it is done. Here Lee Schafer writes from Minnesota about co-working spaces and what’s been lost through teleworking.

Ozy
On weekday mornings, Neftaly Gonzalez hops off his electric cargo bike to pick up food from a Dig Inn location, a fast-casual restaurant, in Manhattan’s Financial District. A manager lets the 28-year-old courier inside and hands him large aluminum trays of prepared food, refrigerated from the night before.

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Tech Radar
Just a couple of months ago, it seemed almost certain that the much-debated changes to IR35 would come into force, and the government seemed adamant that there would be no backtracking. This was before the advent of an unprecedented pandemic, which has forced thousands of businesses around the world into financial strain and uncertainty.

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WIRED
As Covid-19 keeps people indoors, delivery and other contract workers are more visible than ever—making this a pivotal time for them to secure basic rights.

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Bloomberg Law
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court is poised to decide whether driving for Uber disqualified an out-of-work behavioral therapist for unemployment insurance, which could have major ramifications for workers turning to the gig economy after coronavirus-driven job losses.

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The Verge
The scenes that make The Office special aren’t overly zany but are extremely relatable, like Dwight Schrute making an obnoxious sales call at his desk, while Jim and Pam roll their eyes at their colleague’s behavior. It happens almost every episode: two people, the stand-ins for the audience, acknowledging just how annoying the workplace is.

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Nikkei
SINGAPORE — Nicholas Yeo did not expect such a rocky start to his first year as a full-time freelance photographer. The 26-year-old graduate of Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University counted it a blessing that his passion for taking pictures was also his livelihood. Now he doesn’t feel so lucky. As the new coronavirus swept the globe, he saw more and more work dry up as events were canceled or postponed for health and safety reasons.

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The Globe and Mail
But with the glamour that attends the world of professional sports, fans may not realize those tough times extend to athletes such as Pospisil and his fellow Canadian tennis players. Many people who play sports for a living – especially the unionized millionaires in the NHL, NBA and pro soccer – are still getting paycheques. But tennis players are essentially gig workers: With prize money from tournaments as their only source of income, most have seen their earnings drop away to nothing.

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