#7
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  • Reimbursment for supplies (#1)
  • UK freelancer tax reforms (#8)
  • Food, rent or insurance? (#3)
  • Corporate housing start up Zeus Living (#23)


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Bloomberg Law

San Francisco’s close to requiring that companies contracting with gig workers — including hometown delivery platforms , Instacart, DoorDash, and Postmates — reimburse workers for cleaning supplies, among other protections, during the Covid-19 pandemic.


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The Hindu Business Line

Driver-hiring platform DriveU’s founder shares his perspective on the future of mobility.


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New York Times

Two days before learning that she would lose her job, Lissa Gilliam spent hundreds of dollars online on baby products.


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Federal News Network

Ridesharing companies Uber and Lyft, and their drivers particularly, are taking a big financial hit — much as 80% according to some estimates — during the coronavirus pandemic. But when things return to normal, the two gig economy giants are primed to take advantage of a five-year blanket purchase agreement with a $810 million ceiling to transport federal employees.


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The Washington Post

“The gig economy is coming for your job,” said a recent New York Times op-ed.


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We have been told time and again that gig workers are coming for our jobs, but is this really true? The Shelly Steward writes for the Washington Post about five “myths” related to the gig economy in this piece that adds a bit of nuance.

INSEAD

When it comes to employee satisfaction in these extraordinary times, Alibaba and other Chinese e-commerce players leave Amazon in their trail.


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Associated Press

Like many Americans cooped up during the virus outbreak, Jeff Kardesch of Austin, Texas, is spending a lot of time on social media. It isn’t just idle talk with friends. Kardesch is struggling to find out when he’ll receive the unemployment benefits he needs.


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Computer Weekly ($)

Despite the Finance Bill Sub-Committee claiming it would argue for the IR35 reforms to be delayed even if there were no pandemic, HM Treasury remains committed to revised April 2021 roll-out date.


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Payments Journal

Most gig workers operate their daily lives with instant mobile connectivity that provides access to available job options and rich data. Unfortunately, when these gig workers are paid for their services, it’s often coming through antiquated means.


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Your Story

Cracking a deal during times of crisis is difficult and one has to be very tactical in one’s approach to land a good deal.


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Entrepreneur

For creatives, who make up a big portion of the modern freelance market, there’s often uncertainty about protecting pricing and boundaries. And yet pricing and boundaries are also extremely important for anyone running a business. (If you’re a freelancer, that’s you! You are the CEO of your company.) Knowing when and how to negotiate is a very valuable skill, and the good news is that you don’t need an MBA to start leveraging negotiation techniques.


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Negotiation skills are among the most important traits for freelancers looking to get the appropriate amount for their skills or labor. Laura Briggs interviews a successful freelancer and puts together a few tips to help you in building up negotiation as a skill.

Business Insider

The programs are designed to stifle the economic effect of the pandemic that has already killed more than 46,000 Americans and launched an economic crisis that put 26 million Americans out of work in the past five weeks.


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The Denver Post

Colorado’s unemployment insurance system struggled this week as the state launched a new platform for self-employed workers, while also paying out $600 a week in additional benefits the federal government offered under the CARE Act.


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Business Insider

Continue honing your editing skills by reading and taking classes and consider offering other services like ghostwriting and writing social media copy.


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Associated Press

NASHVILLE – Colin Poulton moved to Nashville in 2008 to study commercial guitar. He dropped out of college but stuck with the city and the guitar, first playing in a series of original bands and more recently making his living in the honky-tonks of Lower Broadway along with a few wedding bands and some other bands.


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NPR

Debbie Davis deleted most of what was on her Google calendar over the first weeks of April. “It was too depressing,” she says, on a long phone call she likely wouldn’t have had time for under normal circumstances.


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Certain cities have the gig economy play an even bigger role in daily life, particularly some with large music scenes mentioned on this list. Here Alison Fensterstock reports for NPR about an industry quite literally driven by gigs, and other problems like the prevalence of cash.

The Motley Fool

Our hosts take a look at what goes on behind the scenes for food to reach your doorstep.


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Vice

I once spent six months living in the mailroom of VICE’s Brooklyn office. I’m actually not kidding: Back before my long-time employer took over the building, the brick-and-cinder-block warehouse on South Second and Kent was home to numerous artist lofts, along with various now-defunct underground music venues with filthy bathrooms and lax smoking policies, like Death by Audio, Glasslands, and 285 Kent.


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Forbes

After passing new stimulus legislation this week, Congress is set to add $310 billion to the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). The second round of applications will officially open soon. And whether you’re waiting on an already submitted application or you’re itching to apply, here are five things to remember as you get ready for PPP to open back up.


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CNN

The smell of red enchiladas and Peruvian lomo saltado filled the kitchen as Maria and Luis Ramirez cooked non-stop.


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Komando

If you’re like the rest of us, you’ve probably been relying on delivery quite a bit more lately. By staying at home and ordering in, you’re helping to flatten the curve, as well as reducing your risk of exposure.


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Statesman

“Part of being a lifelong freelancer is you’ve got to be a little bit crazy”


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Business Insider

Last Monday, CEO Kulveer Taggar hosted a Zoom conference for landlords, where he said that the company had $2.5 million in cancellations in March.


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The Conversation

A lot of press has been made about travel and airline cancellations and disruptions to manufacturing and trade. Yet groceries have remained stocked with basic necessities as the food supply continues to operate, even if it’s in lieu of more variety.


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Associated Press

For some $15 a day, deliverymen don masks and gloves in Iran’s capital to zip across its pandemic-subdued streets to drop off groceries and food for those sheltering at home from the virus.


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