#10
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  • Closer look at cobalt (#1)
  • What EU’s Green Deal means (#9)
  • What cities can do (#8)
  • Investing and Divesting (#19)


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Ensia

Demand for cobalt is expected to soar in coming years as electric vehicles take to roads everywhere.


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The world of renewable energy also on some level relies on being able to produce things like sustainable rechargeable batteries. Here Bianca Nogrady for Ensia looks at the role of cobalt and issues including human rights that impact its supply chains in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

New York Times

WASHINGTON — The United States is on track to produce more electricity this year from renewable power than from coal for the first time on record, new government projections show, a transformation partly driven by the coronavirus pandemic, with profound implications in the fight against climate change.


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Reuters

Europe’s top oil and gas companies have diverted a larger share of their cash to green energy projects since the coronavirus outbreak in a bet the global health crisis will leave a long-term dent in fossil fuel demand, according to a Reuters review of company statements and interviews with executives.


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World Economic Forum

The year 2020 was supposed to be a turning point in the global energy transition. The production and consumption of energy accounts for two-thirds of annual global anthropogenic emissions, making the energy transition central to delivering the promise of the Paris Agreement.


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TIME

As attention around the world shifts from the immediate health crisis provoked by the coronavirus pandemic, countries are contending with an array of considerations necessary to reopen their economies. Industries will be pumped with money, infrastructure revitalized and workers trained in new skills as government and financial leaders spend trillions of dollars, perhaps tens of trillions, on recovery and growth initiatives.


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The Guardian

As countries and companies work towards ambitious 2030 emissions targets, poor investments today will soon be exposed.


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Reuters

The Trump administration has ended a two-year rent holiday for solar and wind projects operating on federal lands, handing them whopping retroactive bills at a time the industry is struggling with the fallout of the coronavirus outbreak, according to company officials.


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The Business Times (Singapore)

For several weeks now people around the world have been starting and ending their day with the updates on the ongoing global pandemic. This piece is not about the coronavirus; it offers a perspective on a seemingly unrelated topic – the role of ASEAN cities in the region’s sustainable energy future.


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Euractiv

In the wake of an escalating global oil industry crisis, drastic global energy law reforms are more needed than ever in order to salvage a viable energy transition, argue Vicente López-Ibor Mayor and Raphael Heffron.


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The EU Green Deal has been a topic of great debate for several months now. Professor Raphael Heffron and Spain’s former energy commissioner Vicente Lopez-Ibor Mayor argue that the deal will assume even more significance after the COVID crisis ends.

The Hindu Business Line

On April 5, 2020, India carried a nine-minute-long electricity experiment to express solidarity and combat Covid-19. Hydropower heralded its heroic capacity to manage the safety and stability of the nationwide electricity grid system despite an unexpected load depression of about 31,089 MW. Hydropower is clean and cheap in long run. It has features like quick ramping, black start and reactive absorption — required for ideal peaking power or spinning reserve.


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The Guardian

Britain’s biggest green energy companies are on track to deliver multibillion-pound windfarm investments across the north-east of England and Scotland to help power a cleaner economic recovery.


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New York Times

HOUSTON — A few months ago, Israel and some Arab countries were laying the groundwork for an energy partnership that held the potential for economic cooperation between once-hostile neighbors.


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Financial Express

The proposal is to make it mandatory for discoms to procure the specified percentage of hydro power, as is being done for solar, wind, etc, with non-fulfillment inviting penalty.


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Oil Price

Some very wrong but intuitively appealing ideas about energy keep recurring. These are the ideological equivalents of vampires in old movies, waking hungry and rising from the coffin every night until the hero arrives with a silver stake. The latest “vampire” argument, is that energy decarbonization is an unreasonable goal at this time because it’s too expensive.


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Deseret News

Of all the priorities that must be on Rep. Rob Bishop’s list during the midst of this pandemic — getting help for Utah businesses, making sure working families are getting their relief checks, increasing the number of COVID-19 tests available — I would have thought that threatening major U.S. banks over their investment decisions would have been at the bottom.


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Some of the articles on this list look at investing in fossil fuels. Here Jamie Henn argues from a local perspective that while we must thank our oil and gas industry, it is time to move to renewables.

The Herald (Scotland)

Gravitricity Limited is a research and development company developing patented underground energy.


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Bloomberg Law

In the midst of a global pandemic, it can be hard to think of environmental issues as pressing concerns. But climate change, like Covid-19, affects all of us. Indeed, climate change exacerbates certain types of epidemics, particularly after floods and storms.


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Irish Examiner

In times of crises, Irish businesses big and small are understandably focusing on survival and wondering if they will be able to keep the days open by the end of the summer, writes Áine Kenny.


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Duke Chronicle

Thirty-five years ago, a group of 50 students gathered outside the Allen Building, chanting, “Duke, Duke, we can’t hide. We know we support apartheid. Divest now.”


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University of Toronto

Researchers at U of T Engineering and Carnegie Mellon University are using artificial intelligence (AI) to accelerate progress in transforming waste carbon into a commercially valuable product with record efficiency. They leveraged AI to speed up the search for the key material in a new catalyst that converts carbon dioxide (CO2) into ethylene — a chemical precursor to a wide range of products, from plastics to dish detergent.


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The Independent (Zimbabwe)

Environmentalists are opposing a plan by Zimbabwe Stock Exchange-listed miner RioZim to build a US$3 billion coal-fired 2 100-megawatt Sengwa power station in view of the potential impact on the environment and local community.


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New Indian Express

The global institutional framework’s inadequacies are now evident. Here are some directions along which the next phase of international relations should be explored.


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Newsweek

More and more Republican voters believe in human-caused climate change. And Republican lawmakers are taking action.


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Cell Press

Wind plants in the United States–especially the newest models–remain relatively efficient over time, with only a 13% drop in the plants’ performance over 17 years, researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory report in the May 13 issue of the journal Joule. Their study also suggests that a production tax credit provides an effective incentive to maintain the plants during the 10-year window in which they are eligible to receive it. When this tax credit window closes, wind plant performance drops.


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Mail and Guardian

To address South Africa’s water crisis we must overhaul our non-inclusive systems of water access. That includes kicking our addiction to water-hungry, climate-change-causing coal.


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