#11
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  • Green growth falls (#3)
  • Harnessing shadows (#10)
  • Leaked EU plans (#9)
  • All about uranium (#23)


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World Economic Forum

India imposed the world’s most stringent lockdown against COVID-19. A long recovery period is expected, with a recession as well as shifts in spending patterns, hits to tourism and changes in discretionary purchases.


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The Guardian

National Grid may ask suppliers to stop generating electricity due to record low consumption.


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Reuters

Global growth in new renewable energy capacity will experience its first annual decline in 20 years this year amid the coronavirus pandemic but is expected to pick up next year, the International Energy Agency said on Wednesday.


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In recent years, the talk about the the transition to green energy has been growing. The growth itself, though, may be slowing. Nina Chestney reports.

Times of India

The Covid crisis has diverted attention from a major breakthrough that should leave all smiling. The latest auction for 400 MW of solar power, including storage, has been won by ReNew Power with a levelised tariff of Rs 3.52/unit over 15 years. The equivalent thermal power tariff would have been closer to Rs 4.5/unit. Solar energy has beaten coal-based power hollow, and would do so even if taxes and cesses on coal were lifted.


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CNN

Before the coronavirus pandemic hit, India and China were positioning themselves as global climate leaders.


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Singularity Hub

Amid the coronavirus lockdowns around the world, one of few positive pieces of news we’ve heard is that carbon emissions have dropped dramatically. The clearer skies and cleaner air have led to a renewed vigour behind calls for retiring fossil fuels and investing more heavily in renewable energy.


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The Hindu Business Line

Although the Covid-19 pandemic could tilt the scales temporarily, the strong foundation laid in recent times will stand renewables in good stead, says M Ramesh.


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World Bank

April economic activity data released last Friday revealed mixed news about China’s recovery from the coronavirus-induced economic downturn. The good news is that industrial production and trade recovered more strongly than expected following the serious shock of the first quarter. The bad news is retail sales were even weaker than hoped and investment recovered gradually, mostly driven by resilient real estate investments with manufacturing and infrastructure investment remaining weak.


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Euractiv

The European Commission’s promised green recovery plan will focus on building renovation, renewables and hydrogen as well as clean mobility and the circular economy, according to a leaked working document obtained by EURACTIV.


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National University of Singapore

Shadows are often associated with darkness and uncertainty. Now, researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) are giving shadows a positive spin by demonstrating a way to harness this common but often overlooked optical effect to generate electricity. This novel concept opens up new approaches in generating green energy under indoor lighting conditions to power electronics.


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If we want to reduce our dependency on fossil fuels, it is important to find new ways of generating electricity, including some that are innovative. Researchers from the National University of Singapore have done just that by generating electricity using the contrast between light and dark.

Washington Examiner

America’s energy sector has seen better days. The recent price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia rocked oil and gas markets, and the coronavirus outbreak has reduced demand and forced some companies in the renewable sector to stall projects and furlough workers.


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Al Jazeera

Paris – Highlighting the growth of fast fashion – at least in the form of increasing volumes of cheap and disposable clothing – TRAID’s warehouse in London was receiving around 3,000 tonnes of donated clothes every year before coronavirus hit.


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The Conversation

The global COVID-19 quarantine has meant less air pollution in cities and clearer skies. Animals are strolling through public spaces, and sound pollution has diminished, allowing us to hear the birds sing.


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Oil Price

The global energy and travel industries have been some of the hardest hit by the coronavirus crisis, with the energy market experiencing its biggest shock post-WWII. Widespread lockdowns have resulted in energy demand plummeting, dwarfing the decline recorded during the 2008 financial crisis.


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The Daily Californian

With lab spaces taking up 25% of campus buildings, mitigating the negative environmental impacts of research in labs is a necessary step to achieving some of campus’s long-term sustainability goals.


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Bloomberg

Electricity utility Interconexion Electrica SA is expanding its network of power transmission lines in Latin America to provide a backbone for the increase in renewable energy in the region.


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Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

RICHLAND – A technology developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory could pave the way for increased fuel economy and lower greenhouse gas emissions as part of an octane-on-demand fuel-delivery system.


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The Hindu

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman’s proposal for reform of power tariff policy — announced as part of the stimulus package following the pandemic — is of a piece with the recent comprehensive proposal to amend the Electricity Act 2003; put together, they erode the concurrent status accorded to electricity in the Constitution.


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Financial Times

Amid the global tragedy of Covid-19, one of the few positive developments has been the enthusiasm to “Build Back Better”.


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If we want to focus on a green economic recovery after the current pandemic ends, special attention may need to be paid to the kind of construction materials that we use. Lord Barker argues that we need to opt for low carbon materials going forward.

Euractiv

As Europe starts to get a better grip on the COVID-19 emergency, we need to undertake the immense task of rebuilding our economies and repairing the staggering damage to our communities, workers and businesses, write Frans Timmermans and Fatih Birol.


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Electrek

Daily global carbon dioxide emissions decreased by 17% in 2020 by early April compared with the mean 2019 levels. This is based on energy, activity, and policy data available up to the end of April due to coronavirus lockdowns and the reduction of economic activities.


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Bloomberg

The dangerous added-effects of air pollution during the pandemic have emerged as the latest partisan flashpoint in Washington. Research shows emissions may heighten the risk of complications and death from Covid-19.


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Forbes

The Uranium Committee of the Energy Minerals Division of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists just released their draft 2020 Annual Report last week and the prices and supplies of uranium look pretty good.


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Foreign Policy ($)

Europe’s pandemic bailouts are trying to save the continent’s economy. Less clear is if they will save the planet.


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Al Monitor

Egypt has been seeking in recent years to increase its exports of power energy and meet the needs of neighboring countries, since it has a surplus of about 20,000 MW. By doing so, Egypt also seeks to increase its national income and become an attractive market for future energy investment, which offsets the costs that have been spent on those projects and then achieves net revenue.


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