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  • Energy use in video games (#5)
  • COVID19 hurts Asian transition (#2)
  • Virtual power plant in Australia (#10)
  • Unprofitable coal plants (#17)


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The New York Times

A few years ago, the kind of double-digit drop in oil and gas prices the world is experiencing now because of the coronavirus pandemic might have increased the use of fossil fuels and hurt renewable energy sources like wind and solar farms.


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Channel News Asia

BANGKOK: Regional aspirations for a swift transition from fossil fuel to renewable energy are likely to be dashed by the economic and market crises triggered by the global COVID-19 outbreak, experts say.


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Grist

As hundreds of millions of Americans change their lifestyles to flatten the COVID-19 infection curve, they’re inadvertently shifting energy supply and demand curves too.


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Independent (Ireland)

Wind farms are losing out on tens of millions of euro because of constraints in Ireland’s transmission system and the problem is getting worse, a new study shows.


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CNet

With new consoles, cloud gaming and VR just over the horizon, video games may have a greater impact on the environment than ever before.


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Video game consoles are quite popular around the world, but do we ever think about the energy consumed by the games? Jackson Ryan explores whether the next generation consoles should be powered by renewables.

The Hill

The novel coronavirus pandemic could not have come at a worse time for America’s clean energy industry.


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Real Clear Politics

Regardless of the eventual outcome of the Chinese coronavirus pandemic, it has shown the American people, yet again, that the political leaders of both parties have made terrible decisions in the past. The decisions on offshoring production, especially that of antibiotics and drugs, and our weak and porous borders, have made it abundantly clear how vulnerable we are on the manufacturing and immigration fronts.


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Oil Price

Rows of huge tanks full of chemical solutions storing energy generated from massive solar and wind farms and powering whole cities: It’s a landscape that millennials might very well equate with the new normal.


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Forbes

Alongside the grim societal and economic reality we face amid the COVID-19 pandemic is the very real challenge of maintaining and operating critical infrastructure around the world. Referring to assets that are essential for the everyday functioning of societies, critical infrastructure provides the foundation on which modern economies are built.


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Clean Technica

Last year, Tesla, with the cooperation of the South Australian government, installed rooftop solar systems coupled with Powerwall residential storage batteries on over 1,000 low-income homes.


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Not many people may know that Tesla has set up a solar power unit in South Australia. Steve Hanley tracks the progress so far and makes predictions about the future of this initiative.

The Hill

On Friday, representatives of exploration and production (E&P) companies from the oil and gas sector met with President Trump at the White House, seeking government intervention to increase the price of energy. More expensive energy is the last thing our economy needs right now.


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American Prospect

President Trump has said he wants a big infrastructure program as part of the next federal rescue bill. So do Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer.


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ipolitics

As we grapple with the urgency of the COVID-19 pandemic, the climate crisis gathers force, posing long-term threats at least as severe as the current, more temporary distress.


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CBC

There are the statistics, graphs and charts that provide a snapshot of B.C.’s economy in the face of COVID-19. And then there’s Gabriel Stratulat’s day-timer.


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Clean Technica

The focus of the news today is on how many people will succumb to the ravages of the COVID-19 virus. The latest best guess is around 1 million people may die around the world because of it, with over 100,000 of those deaths occurring in the US. But no one knows for sure. The final figure could be lower or much, much higher. A lot depends on how nations, states, counties, and cities react and how they struggle to restart economies devastated by the disease.


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Eurasia Review

Rosa Manzano carefully arranges pieces of wood in a big mud igloo that, seven days after it is full, will produce charcoal of high caloric content.


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Mexico is one of the countries that is aiming to quickly drift away from fossil fuels. Emilio Godoy finds out that the key driver behind the plan is Bioenergy.

Reuters

China and other countries could be planning to build more coal plants to stimulate their economies in the wake of the novel coronavirus pandemic but nearly half of global coal plants will run at a loss this year, research showed on Wednesday.


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Northwest Indiana Times

The corn and soybeans long raised at farms in southern Lake County soon may be joined by a truly 21st century crop — sunlight.


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The Hill

In the midst of an international pandemic, and on a debate stage eerily surrounded by empty seats, Joe Biden couldn’t resist revealing his true feelings about America’s energy future.


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Irish Examiner

Wildlife roaming the empty streets of the world’s busiest cities prompts the question as to whether the pandemic might actually be good for nature and the climate. Experts discuss this idea with Padraig Hoare


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The Guardian

More than $80bn of investment decisions are delayed due to a collapsed oil price and a geopolitical price war.


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Pocket Lint

Reducing carbon emissions and compensating for them is going to be something we hear a lot more about over the next few years. With carbon targets now in place for many countries – such as the UK’s 2050 target – we’re mere years away from a seismic shift in how companies deal with carbon emissions.


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University of Southern California

USC scientists have developed a new battery that could solve the electricity storage problem constraining widespread use of renewable energy.


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Financial Times ($)

A solar farm the size of a small city will open in the Texas shale heartland this month, adding more competition to a US oil and gas industry that is already flat on its back.


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PC Mag

Electricity costs money. Devices can help you save, especially by killing vampire energy leaks — if you know what they do and how to understand your bills.


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