#6
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  • Self-preservation strategy (#5+13)
  • Respiratory health and coal (#18)
  • Clean energy jobs (#7)
  • Lockdown emissions (#23)


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Euractiv

The coronavirus crisis has caused a lot of suffering and uncertainty, but its aftermath offers us an opportunity to break with old habits.


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Star Tribune

More than 250 million gallons of raw wastewater rushes down sewers every day across the Twin Cities. There, it flows with all the liquid waste and by-products from breweries, dairies and other industries into one of a number of treatment plants. Then it literally hits the fan.


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Forbes

South Korea’s Democratic party has won a landslide victory in elections that took place yesterday, achieving a strong mandate for a European-style Green New Deal, making it the nation first in east Asia to enact a pledge to reach net zero emissions by 2050.


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Green Biz

Most people’s wallets are slammed shut right now, and an unthinkable number of people face unemployment and loss of business. The coronavirus pandemic offers a painful and unique opportunity to re-envision the economy we want and how we get there.


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Nature

A strategy that informs on countries’ potential losses due to lack of climate action may facilitate global climate governance. Here, we quantify a distribution of mitigation effort whereby each country is economically better off than under current climate pledges.


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Euractiv

Can renewable energies be used to keep the power grids running smoothly when the sun is not shining and the wind not blowing?


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E2.org

More than 106,000 clean energy workers lost their jobs in the month of March, according to a new analysis released on April 15 by (Environmental Entrepreneurs), the American Council on Renewable Energy (ACORE), E4TheFuture and BW Research Partnership.


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Almost all industries have been hit by the coronavirus crisis. Here, a report by E2.org shows that there have also been significant job losses in the clean energy sector during March.

The Guardian

Polluting industries around the world are using the coronavirus pandemic to gain billions of dollars in bailouts and to weaken and delay environmental protections.


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Clean Technica

Fossil fuel stakeholders still have this dream that carbon capture can breath new life into coal and gas power plants. However, new technology is throwing cold water on the idea. After all, why burn fossil fuels to pump additional carbon out from underground, when there is already plenty of extra CO2 swimming around up top, ripe for the picking? Good question! That leads to another challenge: how to pick your carbon fruit and sell it, too.


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Associated Press

Travis Deti has been working the phones to try to get government support for the U.S. coal industry during the coronavirus pandemic. Between recent calls, the head of the Wyoming Mining Association tried to unclog a sink at home.


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Stanford University

On April 20, when Stanford kicks off a virtual week-long celebration of the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, the campus will be ahead of schedule to meet sustainability goals and looking ahead to new areas where the university can have an impact.


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Bloomberg

The Trump administration is considering paying U.S. companies to keep the oil they produce in the ground to help alleviate a historic glut.


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Inverse

Climate change isn’t all about cost. It can be about gain, too.


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It is often argued that countries around the world need to come together to facilitate a transition towards green energy. Here, Nina Pullano reports about a new study (above from Nature) that estimates the monetary benefits of such a coming together – up to $616 trillion.

Financial Times ($)

Near the top of the Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii, 3,400m above sea level, a gleaming observatory surrounded by dark lava rocks measures carbon dioxide levels every second of every day.


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The Guardian

The Covid-19 pandemic is a harbinger of climate disasters to come and the resilience we need to build into our systems.


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Independent (UK)

“We’ll emerge from this crisis greener than ever before,” say the optimists. While we’re cooped up at home, we can hear the birds singing and breathe cleaner air. We’re Zooming into meetings online, not rushing around by car and public transport or jumping onto planes. So carbon emissions are falling.


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PTI

In its report released on Friday, the CII has suggested host of measures like easy credit facility for discoms (from PFC and REC) to pay off its dues to Gencos, lower tariff especially for industrial and commercial consumers and deferral of indirect taxes like electricity duty, coal cess etc.


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Columbia University

After four Louisville, Kentucky, coal-fired power plants either retired coal as their energy source or installed stricter emissions controls, local residents’ asthma symptoms and asthma-related hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits dropped dramatically, according to research published in Nature Energy this week by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, Propeller Health, University of California Berkeley, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, University of Texas Austin, Colorado State University, Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness, Louisville Metro Office of Civic Innovation and Technology, the Christina Lee Brown Envirome Institute and Family Allergy & Asthma.


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Part of green energy is not just sustainability, but other areas such as health. Here research from Columbia’s public health school and others looks at coal and respiratory health.

Power Pulse

A recent breakthrough from Deakin’s Institute for Frontier Materials (IFM) represents a viable alternative to the popular rechargeable lithium-ion batteries currently in use in portable electronics and electric vehicles; and is the culmination of more than 10 years of work at Deakin by IFM electromaterials experts led by Professors Maria Forsyth and Patrick Howlett.


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NY Times

Hopefully, when Congress gets done allocating several trillion dollars simply to keep the economy afloat, we will be able to have another discussion: What should we invest in so we don’t just burden young Americans with a mountain of new debt, but also arm them with the tools to grow out of it and still prosper in the 21st century?


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Economic Times (Times of India)

NEW DELHI: Regulated power plants may have to take a tariff haircut on return on equity and fixed costs, as the government is considering a demand from electricity distribution companies to lower costs amid the Covid-19 pandemic. Many distribution companies have declared force majeure, denying or deferring fixed charges for power not being used during the lockdown period.


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Portland Press Herald

With coronavirus full steam, a little April snowstorm and others looming, Central Maine Power can’t seem to get out of its own way. Why should nearly 260,000 Mainers lose power in April? Is it because CMP has not upgraded its antiquated grid ? Or maybe they’re spending too much on ads advertising their clean energy corridor?


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Stuff NZ

Emissions in New Zealand during lockdown have dropped to levels normally only seen on Christmas and New Year’s Day.


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HuffPost

The new initiative, called Evergreen, aims to push the Washington governor’s widely hailed campaign platform on Joe Biden and congressional leaders.


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Nikkei

Vandana Hari is founder of Singapore-based Vanda Insights, which tracks energy markets.


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