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  • What cheap oil means (#1+#2)
  • Hollywood and energy use (#16)
  • Reviving India’s solar sector (#5)
  • Shortages in South Africa (#20)


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WSJ

As oil prices spiked in the late 1970s, then U.S. President Jimmy Carter installed solar panels on the roof of the White House. Historically, expensive crude spurred experiments to develop alternative energy sources and falling prices reversed the trend.


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Bloomberg

Low oil prices are usually a curse for green energy, but this time might be different.


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Historically, lower oil prices have resulted in countries putting green energy on the back burner. However, this time around, the pressure from the consumers may just push the world towards a renewable future, Laura Hurst writes.

The Conversation

Indonesia is a tropical country with year-round sunshine. My research on how Indonesia can generate electricity entirely from renewable energy has calculated the country has the potential to generate about 640,000 Terrawatt-hours (TWh) per year from solar energy. That’s equivalent to 2,300 times last year’s electricity production.


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Brookings

The coronavirus pandemic has sent crude oil prices plummeting, so much so that the price for West Texas Intermediate oil dropped below zero dollars earlier this week.


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The Hindu Business Line

The renewable energy industry is reeling under the effects of reduced imports from China and increasing cash outflows. It needs a comprehensive plan that deals with debt servicing and workforce issues.


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Clean Technica

Renewable energy developers are wilting under the economic pressure attending the COVID-19 crisis, but major US clean energy buyers are still keeping the decarbonization movement going. In the latest news on that score, General Motors has just announced a new clean power investment of 500,000 MWh in solar through the Michigan utility DTE, even as it makes a sharp U-turn into the medical supply area.


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Oil Price

As the world continues to grapple with the worst global pandemic in living memory, economists everywhere are warning that we are witnessing the unraveling of something far grimmer than the 2008 financial crisis: the Great Depression 2.0.


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Telangana Today

There are lessons to be learnt from the battle against Coronavirus pandemic. We are all hunkered down at home or hospital, or working on the frontline emergencies and engaged in contributing our part to face a common enemy together. When COVID-19 is finally behind us, while returning to normal life, we must hold on to the lessons learnt from the fight against climate change.


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Fast Company

As the pandemic has shut down much of the global economy — at the same time as a price war on oil — oil prices have cratered. In the U.S., crude oil prices went negative for the first time in history on Monday. Whiting Petroleum, a large shale oil company, filed for bankruptcy earlier this month, and hundreds of other oil companies are also now at risk of bankruptcy. Natural gas prices are also falling. At a time when the world needs to transition from fossil fuels to avoid the even bigger catastrophe of climate change, what does the state of the industry mean for the climate?


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Quartz

While India should prioritise health and economic recovery in the aftermath of the Covid-19 crisis, there will also be an opportunity for clean energy transition as part of coping strategies and support measures, says a report which examines India’s energy policies.


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India has long indicated its willingness to transition towards a greener future. The post-coronavirus period might just be the right time to speed up those plans, Mayank Aggarwal writes.

Daily Maverick

With Eskom being the country’s largest emitter of CO2 through the burning of coal for power generation, what is Eskom doing to reduce its carbon footprint, what are the key ingredients for unlocking a just energy transition in South Africa, and what role should Eskom be playing in this transition?


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Oil Price

Presently, one-sixth of our electric bill goes to pay for fossil fuels to generate electricity. When fuel prices were higher the percentage was even bigger. Despite all the hoopla about deregulation and decarbonization, electricity prices have moved more in line with fuel costs than any other element of expense like interest or labor.


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Green Biz

Since mid-March, as the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic infected certain sectors of the U.S. economy, more than 200 U.S. startups have cut thousands of jobs. While they’re not immune to the forthcoming fiscal challenges, entrepreneurs developing solutions for addressing climate change — from agtech to decarbonization to clean energy and more — are among those proving to be the most resilient.


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Quartz

After fighting in two Democratic presidential primary campaigns, Maggie Thomas may face her toughest election yet. The former climate advisor for Washington governor Jay Inslee and Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren is running for Yale University’s board of trustees. Backed by the climate activist group Yale Forward (inspired by a similar group at Harvard), Thomas hopes to rally alumni behind an “ethical investment strategy” that calls for rapid, full divestment of all university assets from fossil fuels and greater consideration of environmental, racial, and social justice.


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The Conversation

Before January this year, many people around the world had never heard of Wuhan. Today, this Chinese megacity – population 11 million – has achieved notoriety as the birthplace of a pandemic.


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Variety.com

Hollywood’s eco leaders are grappling with ways to save the planet amid a global health crisis that has effectively brought business in America to a halt.


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Straits Times

SINGAPORE – Wednesday (April 22) is Earth Day but it is not like any Earth Day since the event started 50 years ago.


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Deakin University

Australia recently experienced unprecedented bushfires, affecting people’s health in many of its major cities and destroying homes and lives.


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Stuff NZ

OPINION: When I finally made it to Vanuatu’s Ambrym Island after a week of cancelled flights and patchy phone connections, the memories of five years ago came rushing back.


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The Conversation

The decline in economic activity precipitated by the spread of COVID-19 and ensuing lockdown in South Africa is also affecting the country’s electricity supply dynamics. The power outages that were disrupting the economy just a month earlier are suddenly contained. Electricity demand in the lockdown period has decreased by about 7,500MW, corresponding to almost a quarter of its normal peak capacity.


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South Africa’s economy has been crippled by power shortages for a long time. Here, Hartmut Winkler wonders whether renewable energy could be the answer to the country’s woes.

The Japan Times

Jakarta – Wednesday marked the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, which was strikingly different from the previous years. Countries across the planet are grappling with an unprecedented situation in which a seemingly innocuous viral illness turned into a global pandemic in less than 90 days. The novel coronavirus has infected more than 2.7 million people in more than 200 countries, claimed over 190,000 lives and brought most economic activities to a standstill.


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The Hill

As work begins on a near-term aid package, no resource should be spared to support Americans in the fight against COVID-19. We will also face critical choices on the needed investments to bring tens of millions of people on unemployment back into the workforce.


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The Atlantic

By abandoning a major issue, my party is hurting itself politically.


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The Conversation

The largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history began ten years ago, on April 20, 2010. A massive explosion killed 11 workers on the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig, and a blowout spewed more than 3 million barrels of oil from the Macondo well, located 70 miles off the coast of Louisiana.


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The largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history began ten years ago, on April 20, 2010. A massive explosion killed 11 workers on the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig, and a blowout spewed more than 3 million barrels of oil from the Macondo well, located 70 miles off the coast of Louisiana.

Truthout

To a growing portion of the public, this is the existential question of our time: How do we significantly slash greenhouse gas emissions before it’s too late?


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