#8
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  • Big hub in Western Australia (#2)
  • Google goes green (#9)
  • New material for solar cells (#3)
  • New life for Chernobyl (#20)


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Bloomberg

The coronavirus lockdown will cause the biggest drop in energy demand in history, with only renewables managing to increase output through the crisis.


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Sydney Morning Herald

A $22 billion-plus wind and solar renewable energy project in the Pilbara, the largest proposed such hybrid project in the world, has been recommended for environmental approval.


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There has been an increasing focus on transitioning towards green energy in countries like Australia, and it is set to use some of its space. Emma Young reports that the world’s largest wind and solar hub has been approved in Western Australia.

Purdue University

WEST LAFAYETTE – Soft and flexible materials called halide perovskites could make solar cells more efficient at significantly less cost, but they’re too unstable to use.


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Independent (UK)

Global energy demands are set to plunge amid the worst shock to the sector in 70 years due to the coronavirus crisis, with fossil fuels on course for a historic decline and renewables set to gather greater momentum, according to the world’s energy watchdog.


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Project Syndicate

The COVID-19 crisis is far from over. Yet, even as people continue to transmit the coronavirus and the death toll mounts remorselessly, pressure for a return to normal is already growing in some quarters.


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Forbes

The low oil price brings obvious problems for the oil majors, the shale industry and various others, but could it also create difficulties for the renewables sector? Previous oil slumps have seen governments move away from support for renewables and consumers turning to the cheapest option. Is there a danger of this happening again?


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Bloomberg

Developing countries that will drive energy demand and still rely on fossil fuels have the most to gain from making the switch.


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Houston Chronicle

WASHINGTON – As a sudden drop in demand decimates the oil industry, international efforts are underway to ride the lull in fossil fuel consumption to expedite the clean up of the world’s energy sector.


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Bloomberg

The internet giant plans to shift energy use depending on the availability of clean power, inverting the demand response paradigm.


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There has been a lot of debate around the energy use patterns of tech giants. Nathaniel Bullard reports that Google is planning to shift its energy use so that its demands better align with the resources in the grid.

Economic Times (Times of India)

Only 222 mw of solar capacity and 25 mw of wind capacity was installed in March as activities came to a halt following the Covid-19 outbreak, and installation would remain slow for another two months, said industry.


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DW

The world must “keep a close eye on climate protection” as it faces the economic fallout of the pandemic, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Wednesday, speaking remotely for the Petersberg Climate Dialogue.


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Euractiv

The German cabinet adopted today (29 April) an amendment to clean energy rules aimed at enabling immediate measures to be taken during the coronavirus pandemic. But environmentalists are not pleased as solar power caps and distance rules for wind turbines were left out.


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The Hill

With Americans losing their jobs at record-breaking rates, it’s now clear to political leaders (including the president) that a $2 trillion infrastructure investment will be a key step to getting our country back on its feet.


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The News (Pakistan)

The power sector, unfortunately, is often in the news for the wrong reasons — whether it be the growing circular debt, the infamous IPPs, the controversial RLNG deals or the rising cost of electricity, everyone and their uncle has an opinion on how to solve the crisis. The decline has been accelerated by the addition of about 14,000 MW in the last 3-4 years with no demand to match. The nose-diving rupee and the COVID-19 pandemic further seems to have sealed a bleak fate.


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Irish Times

If someone told me a month ago that the name on everybody’s lips is going to be Joe Exotic, I would have been understandably confused. But it’s true: the latest figures from Nielsen show that the first seven episodes of Netflix’s Tiger King have totalled more than 5.3 billion streaming minutes worldwide.


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Rocky Mountain Institute

Over the past several weeks, in order to fight the spread of the coronavirus, millions of Americans have been ordered to stay at home. Businesses across the United States have shut their doors, forcing more than 30 million Americans to file for unemployment benefits while they wait to get to the other side of this crisis.


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Financial Times ($)

Certain environmentalists have long argued that economic growth must end for the sake of the planet. “Degrowth” is concisely defined by one proponent, Riccardo Mastini, as “the abolition of economic growth as a social objective”.


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What should be our priorities in a post-COVID world? Should we focus on rapid economic growth or do we go slow and protect the environment? Tim Harford argues that we need to shift towards a greener future to save the planet.

Irish Times

Negotiations on the formation of a government hit a road bump this week with the Green Party’s “red line” insistence that any new administration would have to sign up to at least a 7 per cent annual reduction in emissions, which is more than twice the target of the current climate action plan.


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Australian Financial Review ($)

French clean energy developer Neoen plans to build the world’s largest battery near Geelong, pitching it as the cheapest way to manage increased demand during “extreme” periods like summer when the grid is under the most strain and at risk of blackout.


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Euractiv

Just outside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, the site of the worst nuclear accident in history, a small town has been given a new lease on life, as a producer of solar energy, writes Juulia Baer-Bader.


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The Conversation

In eight years, US environmentalist and social media star Lauren Singer had never sent an item of rubbish to landfill. But last month, in an impassioned post to her 383,000 Instagram followers, she admitted the reality of COVID-19 has changed that.


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Associated Press

ALBANY – With the push of a red button, one of the two operating nuclear reactors at the Indian Point Energy Center along the Hudson River north of New York City will shut down Thursday night as federal regulators consider the plant owner’s proposal to sell it to a company that plans to demolish it by the end of 2033 at a projected cost of $2.3 billion.


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The Conversation

West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude went negative for the first time in history this month as oil traders got stuck between a mammoth oversupply and lack of places to store it. The international price of “black gold” remains at the bottom of the barrel.


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The Guardian

This crisis is a chance to rebuild our economy for the good of humanity — we should bail out the living world, not its destroyers.


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Live Mint

As businesses across the board come to terms with the adverse impact of covid-19, the oil sector has become witness to massive volatility and downturns.


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