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Deepnews.ai Digest #75

Hong Kong Security Law

Editor: Christopher Brennan
Tensions between the opposition in Hong Kong and its government, as well as Beijing, have been mounting for years, with last summer’s protests one of the earliest subjects covered by this Digest when we launched more than a year ago. Now a new national security law has been imposed, with some fearing it will forever change the city by criminalizing “subversion.” This week’s Digest, gathered with the Deepnews Scoring Model, explores the law and its aftermath, with articles from local sources as well as those wondering about Hong Kong’s place in the world going forward.
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Published every Friday

Bloomberg

Hong Kong’s richest man is losing friends in China and the West

Li Ka-shing’s business empire has become an important test case for whether international companies can keep both sides happy.

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CNN

HSBC may have to choose between East and West as battle for Hong Kong intensifies

HSBC has carved out a lucrative role in global banking over the past 155 years by straddling the line between East and West. Now, a political firestorm over the bank’s hometown of Hong Kong could force the bank to choose sides.

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South China Morning Post

A national security tale of two cities: differences in law between Hong Kong, Macau

Macau and Hong Kong, neighbouring cities under China’s special administrative system, have national security laws, but while they serve the same purpose, the enactment of such legislation has had strikingly different consequences in both places.

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Editor’s Note:

Beyond Hong Kong, Macau also operates under a special system as part of China. Here Natalie Wong digs into the differences between what is happening in Hong Kong and a national security law that has governed Macau for 11 years. – Christopher Brennan, Editor

New York Times

China’s Leash on Hong Kong Tightens, Choking a Broadcaster

HONG KONG — Hong Kong’s public broadcaster has long been a rare example of a government-funded news organization operating on Chinese soil that fearlessly attempts to hold officials accountable.

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Nikkei Asian Review

Hong Kong’s national security law creates new era of repression

Raymond Chan is a member of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong representing the New Territories East constituency.

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Deccan Herald

Taiwan eyes opportunity to assert itself

Taipei has been proactive in exploiting the current geopolitical situation to gain recognition of its position on independence from China

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Straits Times

Softening stance likely from Hong Kong opposition as Beijing shores

HONG KONG – As Hong Kong enters a new chapter with sweeping new national security mooted by Beijing kicking in, the opposition camp is likely to soften its stance as the Sept 6 Legislative Council (Legco) election draws nearer, said observers.

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Editor’s Note:

Navigating how to react to the national security law sometimes boils down to one’s personal plan. Here Claire Huang reports on the opposition’s ideas ahead of the city’s Legislative Council elections set to take place in September. – Christopher Brennan, Editor

South China Morning Post

Hong Kong’s press freedom hits record low, amid fears over security law

Press freedom in the city is the worst in 30 years, Hong Kong Journalists Association chairman Chris Yeung says

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Vox

Hong Kong’s future under China’s new security law, explained

July 1 in Hong Kong has always been a day of protest. It marks the anniversary of the territory’s handover from Britain to China in 1997. This year, 23 years later, Hongkongers protested again — but this time, there was far more at stake than at perhaps any other time since.

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ASPI Strategist

The Hong Kong we know is dead

Hong Kong’s first handover to China, in 1997, came with fireworks, lion dances and a mood of cautious optimism that this former British colony would enjoy ‘a high degree of autonomy’ for at least the next 50 years.

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South China Morning Post

UK needs a new law too, or more firms like HSBC will side with China

Four British companies, under pressure from China, have endorsed Hong Kong’s national security law despite London’s strong opposition.

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Washington Post

New Zealand’s careful China pivot

When it became clear that China was pressing ahead with its encroachment on Hong Kong, the “Five Eyes” countries discussed a joint statement condemning the rapid erosion of freedoms in a city that was supposed to have those safeguards until 2047.

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New York Times

Hong Kong, changed overnight, navigates its new reality

A barge draped with enormous red banners celebrating China’s new security law was sailing across Hong Kong’s famed Victoria Harbor only hours after the legislation passed. Police now hoist a purple sign warning protesters that their chants could be criminal. Along major roads throughout the city, neon-colored flags hailing a new era of stability and prosperity stand erect as soldiers.

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The Conversation

Asylum or economic opportunity? The mixed messages in Australia’s new Hong Kong visa options

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced new visa arrangements to help Hong Kong passport holders stay in Australia.

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Editor’s Note:

One of the reactions to the security law has been other countries opening themselves up as destinations for those leaving Hong Kong. Here Alex Reilly of University of Adelaide digs into the Australian system. – Christopher Brennan, Editor

The Dispatch

China’s Crackdown on Hong Kong Is About Intimidation

As Americans prepare to celebrate our independence this weekend, citizens of Hong Kong are dangerously close to losing theirs. After a year of historic pro-democracy protests in response to Beijing’s 2019 extradition bill, Chinese President Xi Jinping officially enacted a national security law on Tuesday aimed at stamping out dissent in Hong Kong once and for all.

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Reuters

Hong Kong Tiananmen museum turns to digitalisation after new law

HONG KONG – A Hong Kong museum chronicling the crackdown by Chinese troops on pro-democracy protesters in Tiananmen Square is raising funds to digitalise its collection as concerns over a new national security law create uncertainty over its future.

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EFE

Prominent Pro-Democracy Activist Nathan Law Flees Hong Kong

BEIJING – Activist Nathan Law, one of the most prominent student leaders of the Hong Kong pro-democracy movement and leader of the Demosisto political party, has left the former British colony for an unknown destination, he said on social media on Friday.

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Lowy Institute

Beijing crackdown will squeeze business

Investors will make a grave mistake by ignoring how much China’s new national security law will change Hong Kong.

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Financial Times ($)

Time for tech companies to Zoom out of Hong Kong?

There was a time when tech companies could not afford to miss out on China. They wanted to tap its vast market of mobile users and its cheap supply of well-educated developers. But after a decade in which Google, Twitter and Facebook have tried and failed to take root, it has become difficult terrain.

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Hong Kong Free Press

Gov’t refuses to say if protest anthem ‘Glory to Hong Kong’ is illegal, despite ban in schools

The Hong Kong government has refused to say if protest song Glory to Hong Kong is illegal under the national security law, despite a ban by the Education Bureau in schools.

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Deutsche Welle

Germany’s reluctance to speak out against China

Pressure is growing on Germany to take a tougher stance towards China over human rights abuse. For a long time, business interests have stood in the way. But a united European stance is increasingly imperative.

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Editor’s Note:

While some countries have come out strongly against the security law, others are balancing their interests. Here Kate Brady looks at the case of Germany, its trade flows, and its place in Europe. – Christopher Brennan, Editor

Atlantic Council

Can Washington avoid a China “shake and bake”? – Atlantic Council

On July 2, the House of Representatives passed the “Hong Kong Autonomy Bill,” a generously worded piece of legislation that calls for but does not mandate sanctions as recent bills have, notably on Russia.

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The Conversation

Why Hong Kong will remain an international financial centre, despite new security law

Following the introduction of a new Chinese national security law, some are questioning the sustainability of Hong Kong’s position as an international financial centre. These doubts are augmented by China’s plans to transform Hainan, another island off the southern coast of the Chinese mainland, into a free-trade hub. This further calls into question the idea that Hong Kong is irreplaceable for some.

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The Economist ($)

Democracy activists fleeing Hong Kong present a dilemma for Taiwan

The government sympathises with their cause, but is wary of taking too many in.

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The Nation

Why the US-China Rivalry Is Thwarting Transnational Solidarity

The Black Lives Matter and Hong Kong democracy movement can learn a lot from each other.

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