Lockdown Drives Coronavirus Home – UPDATE #48

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Deepnews Digest #48

Lockdown Drives Coronavirus Home – UPDATE

Monday began what for many people was a second week of quarantine, with new additions to those affected in places like the UK, India and parts of the US. This Digest picks up from where the last edition left off and focuses on life under lockdown. From problems with connectivity to how to care for children, this selection of articles from around the world found with the Deepnews Scoring Model offers an expansive look at our days in confinement.


Editor’s Note: Deepnews is trying to help sort through good and bad information on coronavirus as much as we can, with many of our weekly Distill newsletters now highlighting important pieces on what is happening. To follow everything related to coronavirus, take a look at our dedicated page. On it you can see all our newsletters on the disease, as well as information about how we have cut the prices for our Distills during the crisis.
Story Source
The Crime Report (John Jay College)
With the number of COVID-19 cases skyrocketing across the world, many governments are taking drastic measures to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus. Public buildings and schools are closing, small towns and big cities alike are being placed on lockdown, and all who can are being urged to stay home.

Editor’s Note: The flip side of staying put during a quarantine is what happens when it is violated. Here Emily Mooney writes for the Center on Media, Crime and Justice at John Jay College.

Irish News
During the uncertainty that this global pandemic presents, we must remember that hard work, dedication and passion will prevail, but key is compassion and that is what we women do best, we care.

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Bloomberg
Yes, we must defeat the coronavirus. But shutting schools will also cause other problems for millions of children, perhaps lasting a life time.

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Security Boulevard
Most employees work from home only occasionally. The Coronavirus outbreak, however, has recently relegated millions of employees to home offices, kitchen tables, and living room couches. We do our part to flatten the curve when we work from home. Plus, working from home has many advantages, including shorter commutes, more casual dress, and happier pets. Unfortunately, working from home has distinct disadvantages too, like fewer social interactions and a forever beckoning refrigerator and food pantry.

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Gulf News
Covid-19 has quickly emerged as a big risk to the economy. It has the potential to stretch the health care infrastructure of countries, as we are witnessing in Italy. Considering this, more countries are embracing social distancing — this is dramatically changing customer behaviour and has potential of having a lasting impact. Last year was already a breakout year for online retail with growth accelerating compared to previous years. There was also a new Thanksgiving sales event created in November by online players, which further boosted the adoption of online channels.

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The Conversation
The COVID-19 pandemic is a double crisis affecting public health and the economy. And both aspects are playing out in our housing system – in our homes.

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The Hindu
An increase in cooking gas consumption by households is something oil marketing companies are not ruling out, with the lockdown to contain spread of Covid-19 in place in Telangana.

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Quad-City Times
DES MOINES — The COVID-19 pandemic that is forcing employees to work from home and school children to seek online instruction is shining a bright light on Iowa’s broadband challenges and possibly spurring some accelerated action to address it.

Editor’s Note: Several of the items this week deal with the strength of the Internet. While the net is of course a global phenomenon, it has a local angle. Here the Quad City Times reports on the problems its readers may face. Warning: Because of data protection compliance issues, this article is not available in the EU.

SBS
Also, the coronavirus has forced new working-from-home habits that limit commuting, and a broader adoption of online meetings to reduce the need for long-haul business flights. This raises the prospect of long-term emissions reductions should these new work behaviours persist beyond the current global emergency

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Australian Financial Review ($)
Tech entrepreneurs are seeing the COVID-19 devastation at close hand already, but know that downturns can also produce a new wave of business models and IP.

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Press Democrat
In the pedagogical hierarchy, some view online education as a poor substitute for real teaching. Let’s hope they’re wrong, because in our current situation it is all we have. As a longtime college teacher of both on-campus and online courses, I’m confident that our educational community will rise to the occasion in these challenging times.

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AP
Most Californians stayed at home on a Saturday that was unlike any its 40 million residents had ever seen before.

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London Evening Standard
London was never going to meet a pandemic lying down. The city’s main thoroughfares have fallen eerily silent as Transport for London’s network runs a skeleton service. But, at a local level, traffic has never been busier. Online traffic, anyway. WhatsApp groups have sprung up to support impromptu Covid Mutual Aid networks, and are topping out with volunteers wondering how and who they can best help.

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Conservative Home
With companies encouraging their employees to work from home and schools closing across the country, the worlds of remote working for parents and remote learning for students are about to clash.

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The New York Times
On Thursday morning, Chuck Robbins, the chief executive of Cisco, signed on to an companywide video conference from his home office in Silicon Valley. The connection was stable, but the quality was not great.

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Indian Express
With users across the world now relying on their home broadband lines to carry out work tasks and daily entertainment, there’s bound to be an impact on internet speeds given the strain. Ookla, an Speedtest app, has released numbers on the trends they have observed during this outage

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The Outline
While the internet offers a support system for those practicing social distancing, some celebrities can’t help but view everyone stuck at home as a captive audience.

Editor’s Note: Much of life has migrated online, though before that there were the “very online.” Here Darcie Wilder looks at Twitter, celebrity, and what has changed.

Popular Mechanics
As the world continues to work from home indefinitely because of the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic, can an increased demand for high-speed internet crash the whole system? While it’s true the amount of internet bandwidth in the world technically is finite, any breakdowns will be at the local and likely hardware level, not in the shared entire amount of internet itself.

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Asia Times
The increasing implementation of physical lockdowns puts Asian economies in a bind. The government-instituted halting of people’s movements represents devastating news for Asian countries whose economies depend on close physical interactions, primarily through tourism and manufacturing. Tourism makes up more than US$2 trillion of the overall economy of the Asia-Pacific region, while factories and workshops contribute 27.63% of Asian gross domestic product.

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Bloomberg
Zoom Video Communications Inc. shares jumped for a sixth straight session on Monday, as investors continued to bet that the teleconferencing company would be one of the rare winners from the coronavirus pandemic.

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Reuters
NEW DELHI/BENGALURU – As the coronavirus pandemic pushes India into a lockdown, the call centers and IT services firms that function as the world’s back office are struggling to piece together work-from-home solutions and other business-continuity plans.

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CNN
Amazon has become a lifeline for many people desperate to buy household essentials without stepping out of their homes amid the coronavirus outbreak, but some Amazon warehouse workers are plagued by anxiety that their jobs could put their lives, or the lives of their families, at risk

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Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Uber and Lyft driver Omar Holland gives strangers rides in his car. With people staying home, his income has been halved. His wife is a chef at a Marriott hotel, but among the tens of thousands of workers the global chain is temporarily laying off.The Marietta couple also have two kids depending on them. Holland plans to keep working as long as he can, despite risking exposure to the coronavirus and worrying about passing it along to his wife, who takes medicine that weakens her immune system

Editor’s Note: Teleworking has become a topic to talk about, though others are facing a much different situation. Here AJC reports from Georgia, where hourly workers must navigate their finances, families and their health.

Forbes
Chances are that you’re reading this from home. With social distancing encouraged due to the COVID-19 pandemic – and in states like mine, actually mandatory – many taxpayers are working from home. And it’s not just those of us with routine desk jobs: even celebrities like Jimmy Fallon and Savannah Guthrie have been staying home to work.

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Irish Independent ($)
I spent much of last Friday – or day one, as it’s now being referred to – in a blind rage. It kicked off that morning, when an acquaintance texted into a WhatsApp group I am in, one with about 30 members.

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