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  • Coronavirus phishing emails
  • Google bans InfoWars app
  • Trump’s press conferences
  • TikTok nurses


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Euractiv

The whole world is preoccupied with the coronavirus pandemic. Every day, we experience apprehension and our thoughts focus on how we can protect ourselves, our families and countries. Yet, while nations struggle to mobilise their resources to fight this unparalleled epidemic, another virus is spreading almost undetected, Daniel Milo argues.


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The Diplomat

Ensuring awareness and dispelling pseudoscientific practices is a necessity for India to confront the coronavirus.


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CNN

Over the weekend, New York joined Delaware and Pennsylvania as the latest states to move their primaries to June in light of the coronavirus pandemic. Meanwhile, the territory of Puerto Rico, which had already moved its primary to late April, now finds itself less than a month away from holding an election, pending another postponement.


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Alt News India

A video of a mass gathering of people supposedly offering prayers has been massively shared on social media. Facebook user Saleem Ashraf shared an 80-second clip with the message, “इटली में सभी मजहब के लोग सजदे के बल अल्लाह से रो रोकर अपने गुनाहों की माफ़ी की तलब कर रहे है। या अल्लाह दुनिया का तू बादशाह है बेशक जो भी तुझसे मदद की भीख मांग रहे है तौबा की तलब कर रहे हैं तू उनकी दुआ को कुबूल कर और हिदायत दे अमीन”. As per the message, the video depicts scenes from Italy where people are ‘prostrating’ before the God and asking for his forgiveness in the backdrop of the coronavirus pandemic. It may be noted that Italy is one of the worst-hit countries by the pandemic. The video has amassed over 11,000 shares at the moment.


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As coronavirus misinformation spreads around the world, people use the common tactic of taking a video that shows somewhere in the world and saying that it was taken somewhere else. Here Jignesh Patel and Mohammed Zubair use open-source techniques to fact-check a video circulating in India.

Tech Dirt

When I write about this new lawsuit, filed on behalf of “retired MMA fighter” Nick Catone, against Facebook for removing his account over his anti-vaccine posts, you may expect that it was filed pro se. However, somewhat shockingly, there’s an actual lawyer, James Mermigis, who filed this dumpster fire of an awful complaint.


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The New York Times

SAN FRANCISCO — The day after the New Hampshire primary last month, Facebook’s security team removed a network of fake accounts that originated in Iran, which had posted divisive partisan messages about the U.S. election inside private Facebook groups.


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Anadolu

Misinformation on COVID-19 on social media makes it difficult to find reliable resources, says social media specialist


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The Conversation

Propagandists are already working to sow disinformation and social discord in the run-up to the November elections.


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Security Boulevard

As the world battles with the Coronavirus offline, there are plenty of cybercriminals looking to take advantage of the situation online. With so many people locked indoors and hence, online, there has been a 600 percent rise in phishing campaigns in the last month. If you’ve had a flood of emails asking for donations for Coronavirus infected regions of the world or for a testing kit, you’re not alone.


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Lawfare

The coronavirus pandemic has forced people around the world to reexamine many things that are usually taken for granted. On that list is social media content moderation—the practice of social media platforms making and enforcing the rules about what content is or is not allowed on their services


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Gulf News

Dubai: The UAE’s media industry needs the government to support it during this time of extreme stress, in much the same way that other key sectors – banking, airlines, small and medium businesses – have been promised state-sponsored help.


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Associated Press

NEW DELHI — The message started with an outlandish claim: The coronavirus was retreating in India because of “cosmic-level sound waves” created by a collective cheer citizens had been asked to join.


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NBC News

A few days ago, a good friend of mine, the brilliant John Barry, called me giddy about his op-ed in the New York Times illustrating the historical bridges between the COVID-19 crisis and the 1918 Spanish flu. The op-ed was excellent, a singularly informative read. Too bad the people who need to read it never will.


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MIT Sloan Management Review

If you went back to London in the 1600s, you would find a coal-fired metropolis, where heavy smoke from the city’s burning hearths and furnaces damaged buildings. Only during the Industrial Revolution in the mid-1800s, when respiratory diseases became the leading cause of death in the city, did people finally recognize how air pollution was affecting their quality of life. It took even longer to galvanize people into action, with laws finally enacted in the 20th century to improve air quality in London.


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There are a lot of ways to think about the mess that the Internet can often be today. Here Radhika Dutt uses the analogy of pollution, and urges those working online to take responsibility for the products they are putting out there. We hope Deepnews fits the mold.

Washington Post

Quarantined at home this month, Mark Zuckerberg sent a 2,000-word letter to his top deputies in an internal private Facebook group, explaining that society was heading toward a much longer period of social isolation than most understood.


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The Globe and Mail

Thank heavens for Twitter. That cannot be said often. Reading Twitter warriors attacking people and ideas was one of those prepandemic triggers for anxiety and depression about the poverty of discourse in society in general. Right now, mind you, Twitter is a useful safety valve. On Sunday, the hashtag #BoycottTrumpPressConferences was popular. Vast numbers of people take the view that those long, meandering press conferences are confusing and irritating, and that Trump is using them as campaign events rather than to offer information, comfort, assurance and leadership.


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Al Jazeera

Global health experts warn misinformation as dangerous as pandemic as Iraqi media claims coronavirus treatment found.


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Daily Dot

Coronavirus-related TikTok videos show the range — and the possible harms — in how health professionals like nurses approach social media.


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Radio Free Asia

In the era of the coronavirus in Myanmar, online recordings of voices claiming to be those of government officials warn listeners that residents in the commercial hub Yangon have been infected by the contagious pathogen.


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Global Voices

Leaders in Africa are grappling with faith in their messaging on COVID-19, the potentially deadly disease that is spreading rapidly throughout the continent.


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The New York Times

And, more to the point, when all is said and done, my Mom will listen to her children over Fox News. One of us — my brother — is an actual doctor and knows what he is talking about. And the other is a persistent annoyance — that would be me.


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Social media is often discussed, though the coronavirus pandemic has highlighted the role of more traditional outlets like cable TV. Here Kara Swisher gives a personal take, reflecting on her mother’s relationship with Fox News.

Lawfare

The ongoing competition in cyberspace is largely an intelligence contest. Although the technology is different, the underlying contest exhibits all the characteristics of traditional spy-versus-spy battles.


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WIRED

Apple kicked Alex Jones out of the App Store in 2018. The Google Play Store has finally followed suit.


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Associated Press

UNITED NATIONS — U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said Friday the world is not only fighting the “common enemy” of the coronavirus “but our enemy is also the growing surge of misinformation” about COVID-19 disease.


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The Conversation

During times of crisis, like the current COVID-19 pandemic, people need access to reliable information in order to keep themselves safe, manage risk and avoid becoming a burden on others or health-care systems. However, ensuring that people have access to the right information when they need it has become a major challenge due to widespread digital misinformation.


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