#13
single distill image banner

  • Fixing WhatsApp (#1)
  • Campus journalists (#19)
  • The Indian newspaper industry (#14)
  • 5G conspiracy theories (#6+17)


Selection and ranking powered by

deepnews logo


Story Source
Indian Express

WhatsApp users will no longer be able to forward a message to more than one contact at a time like before. The limit kicks in once a WhatsApp message has been previously forwarded five times or more.


Editor’s Note:


Snopes

Networks from the Balkans nation are deploying divisive content and patriotic nostalgia, echoing past foreign election-interference campaigns.


Editor’s Note:


CNBC

Carl Bergstrom is an infectious disease expert who’s been thinking about the relationship between biology and social systems. One central theme in his work is information: How it flows and how it spreads.


Editor’s Note:


Rolling Stone

Many Americans are disturbed that TV networks air the Trump White House’s misinformation-filled coronavirus briefings live and in primetime. One of those people is Mark Lukasiewicz, a former executive at NBC News who also happens to be an ideal person to consult to try to understand why the networks and cable channels continue to broadcast Trump’s briefings unfiltered.


Editor’s Note:


RAND

The practice of disinformation, the deliberate spreading of false information to deceive, has been rife since before the outbreak of COVID-19. However, as a researcher who has examined this phenomenon recently in depth, disinformation about the virus should not ‘infect’ me — and yet, it has, at least for a few seconds.


Editor’s Note:


NY Times

A conspiracy theory linking the spread of the coronavirus to 5G wireless technology has spurred more than 100 incidents this month, British officials said.


Editor’s Note:


If you ever needed an illustration of misinformation having consequences in the real world, you could use one of the pictures of a burnt telecommunications tower in Britain. This article delves into the places where a conspiracy theory is spreading, and its effects.

PBS

Americans right now face a dual challenge: to protect themselves and others from the new illness COVID-19, which is highly contagious and potentially deadly, as well as from the dangers of misinformation about the virus.


Editor’s Note:


Independent (Nigeria)

The first confirmed case of Coronavirus disease in Nigeria was announced on February 27th, 2020, when an Italian in Lagos tested positive for the virus. On March 9th, a second case of the virus was reported in Ewekoro, Ogun State of a Nigerian who had contact with the index case. As the number of those infected continues to explode, ROLAND OBY OGBONNAYA writes on some of the fables about the disease, life in isolation facility, and the healing process.


Editor’s Note:


The Conversation

Clear explanations enhance public trust, which in turn, aids compliance.


Editor’s Note:


The Journal (Ireland)


Editor’s Note:


Vice

As COVID-19 misinformation runs rampant, pseudoscience expert Tim Caulfield has been tasked with keeping track of all the bunk.


Editor’s Note:


Hudson Institute

“Give me liberty or give me death.” Patrick Henry’s rallying cry from 1775 forms the bedrock of our American identity, one that champions individual freedom over the accumulation of government power.


Editor’s Note:


Engineering & Technology

Since Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was diddled by the Cottingley Fairies and Stalin scrubbed his frenemies from photographs, we should have known that media can be manipulated. For the past century, photos, video, and audio have been sliced up and mashed together for the sake of art, satire, and deception.


Editor’s Note:


Ozy

Chhanda Dey woke up, made herself a large mug of tea and walked toward the balcony of her house to pick up the newspaper — a habit she has followed for years. But the resident of an affluent housing society in the eastern Indian city of Kolkata was in for a surprise.


Editor’s Note:


The opposite of misinformation is good information, and the ability of the press to help provide it. Here Ozy laments what is happening to the Indian newspaper industry, which has been more stable than some of its counterparts in other countries.

The Conversation

We have identified nine misconceptions doing the rounds on social media in Africa and set out to counter them. The purpose of debunking these myths is to provide people with trusted information. And to provide people with valid scientifically backed answers which they can share on social media to counter the misinformation and disinformation out there.


Editor’s Note:


Al Jazeera

London, United Kingdom – The theories have spread almost as fast as the new coronavirus: Chloroquine is a proven cure, children are immune and 5G caused the pandemic.


Editor’s Note:


Bloomberg

A conspiracy theory linking 5G technology to the outbreak of the coronavirus is quickly gaining momentum, with celebrities including actor Woody Harrelson promoting the idea. But the theory is also getting a boost from what some researchers say is a coordinated disinformation campaign.


Editor’s Note:


Forbes

Science Feedback is a not-for-profit organization that works with a network of scientists all over the world to verify influential claims and media coverage, so that internet users have access to scientifically sound information. The coronavirus has brought them a lot of extra work. I caught up with the founder and Ashoka Fellow Emmanuel Vincent, a scientist with a PhD from the University Pierre et Marie Curie and a post doc Fellowship at the MIT. He called in from his apartment in Paris.


Editor’s Note:


Rappler

Throughout these 3 weeks, we’ve stood witness to real-time stories of bayanihan, as ordinary Filipinos responded to the calls of frontliners and deeply affected communities.


Editor’s Note:


Quartz

They are also working on government collaborations and translating data into local languages.


Editor’s Note:


Atlas Obscura

In 1933, Minnie Sun worked as a nurse in the baby ward of the Chinese Hospital. Bruce Lee would be born there seven years later. Bettmann / Contributor


Editor’s Note:


There is a type of article that has tragically popped up in this Distill over and over, misinformation that feeds discrimination against different groups. This piece takes a historical perspective, and explores what Chinese Americans did to combat prejudice in the 1800s.

The New Statesman

Conspiracy theories about coronavirus have become so widespread that they’re now generating news stories in the national media and provoking public reactions from government ministers. The most popular seems to be one that links the pandemic to the roll-out of 5G mobile technology. At the beginning of the year, the UK government finally approved the Chinese company Huawei as a supplier of equipment for 5G, after a very public controversy in which critics, many of them on the right of the Conservative Party, voiced objections on the grounds that they believed the company had close connections with the Chinese government. Where is Huawei’s research centre? In Wuhan. And what else was there in Wuhan? The Wuhan Institute of Virology, a top-level research centre. And where did the coronavirus start? Why, in Wuhan too. And when? Just as the roll-out of 5G was beginning.


Editor’s Note:


Alt News India

A video showing a group of policemen gunning down men rushing past a blockade is doing the rounds on social media. As soon as their car reaches the blockade, the men come down charging and supposedly shooting at the policemen. The video is said to be from UP’s Ayodhya city.


Editor’s Note:


The Daily Beast

A Daily Beast investigation reveals dozens of Russian accounts pushing disinformation on everything from Joe Biden to the origin of the novel coronavirus.


Editor’s Note:


AFP FactCheck

AFP has debunked multiple claims shared millions of times on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram since the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease in December 2019. But with over 65 billion messages sent worldwide every day, WhatsApp, one of the biggest platforms for sharing misinformation in Africa, remains a challenge. AFP fact checkers explain how you can spot false COVID-19 claims on WhatsApp.


Editor’s Note:



($) = This source has a hard paywall. You will need to suscribe to view this article.