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  • Corona news fatigue (#3)
  • 7 types that spread misinfo (#16)
  • Fox anchor on interviewing Trump (#7)
  • Press freedom in Philippines (#20)


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Business Standard

History will remember Covid-19 through pictures, accounts of those lived to share their experiences, and reports filed by journalists across the globe, many of whom are putting their lives at risk to cover the pandemic from the front lines. With coronavirus spreading to all parts of the globe, the task of documenting and reporting the news to millions has kept media on its toes despite the risks of contracting the virus. Journalism has always called for reporting from the field, especially during a crisis.


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Harvard Misinformation Review

This essay explores the historical process by which the birth and expansion of information systems transformed the relationship between “faith” and “fact.” The existence of recurring forms of credulity and conversely denial—from holocaust denial to climate change denial—suggests that patterns of belief and disbelief will not be easily resolved either with fact-checking or with the regulation of the press


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The Conversation

During social isolation, Australians have been staying at home to stop the spread of COVID-19. This has resulted in an increase in news and media consumption. After weeks of restricted movement and social distancing, Australians are restless. Not only are they tired of being in lockdown, they are also feeling worn out by news about the coronavirus.


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The coronavirus pandemic has created an unprecedented situation in terms of the media’s attention, and demanding the attention of average citizens. Here researchers from University of Canberra report on the findings of a survey about what this is doing to people’s perception of news.

Anadolu

As the world marks Press Freedom Day on Sunday, a rising tide of fake news and misinformation pumped through mainstream media has become a major concern in India. Linking an event of a Muslim group Tablighi Jamaat for spreading coronavirus or COVID-19 pandemic in the country while overlooking other similar gatherings, the attitude of a section of India’s mainstream media created hatred against Muslim community, leading to their social boycott at various places.


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Mongabay

Around a month ago, an Indian film star shared a video of dolphins near Mumbai shores, on social media.


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News Media Canada

Newspapers have never been so loved – and never been so neglected.


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Deadline

It will be Trump’s first town hall with Baier and MacCallum since March 5, in Scranton, PA, just before unprecedented stay-at-home orders swept the country, the economy took a nosedive and more than 60,000 died of the coronavirus.


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Columbia Journalism Review

In India, the spread of the novel coronavirus has been followed by a spate of threats against press freedom. On March 24, the day Indian prime minister Narendra Modi announced a strict nationwide lockdown, he gathered about twenty of the country’s top news executives for a meeting. Via videoconference, Modi implored the editors and owners to publish “inspiring and positive stories” about the government’s response to the virus.


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Politifact

People experiencing homelessness are also more likely to have pre-existing health conditions, which also makes them higher risk.


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NBC News

There’s a kind of public and collective schadenfreude taking shape on black Twitter. It began after Diamond and Silk, among the best known and most outspoken black supporters of President Donald Trump, were reported to have parted ways with Fox News after they promulgated unproven and dangerous medical advice, false claims, conspiracy theories and misinformation about the coronavirus outbreak.


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One thing about the internet is that it often functions in terms of communities. Here Janell Ross of NBC reports on how misinformation has moved between different groups on the “misinformation family tree.”

Slate

In the past few months, social media companies have scrambled to address the misinformation tearing through their platforms — first about the election, then the coronavirus. Twitter has started using manipulated media labels. Facebook has been more aggressively removing harmful content and flagging false news. This week, YouTube announced that it will add information panels to searches in the U.S. that might bring up misinformation.


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Vox Ukraine

During self-isolation and quarantine people all over the world started spending more time online. Ukrainians started too Internet traffic on quarantine has increased by 25%. Top 3 most popular websites (Google, YouTube, Facebook) among Ukrainian users remain unchanged for years. Nowadays, these social media companies continue to increase their influence. In March, according to KANTAR data, Russian website Vkontakte was in top 15 websites by reach.


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The Conversation

Whether a vaccine can end this pandemic successfully, however, depends on more than its effectiveness at providing immunity against the virus, or how quickly it can be produced in mass quantities. Americans also must choose to receive the vaccine.


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Irish Times

Conspiracy theories are usually seen as quaint and comical until they spill over into real life. The idea of the online investigator deep-diving in his underpants at 3am into the world of Area 51 and international espionage may make us smirk, but then people stop taking vaccines or start burning down telecoms masts and it’s not so funny.


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BBC

Conspiracy theories, misinformation and speculation about coronavirus have flooded social media. But who starts these rumours? And who spreads them? We’ve investigated hundreds of misleading stories during the pandemic. It’s given us an idea about who is behind misinformation – and what motivates them. Here are seven types of people who start and spread falsehoods:


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The Conversation

To manage the COVID-19 pandemic, be it from a personal, national or global perspective, we rely on a constant stream of information. A plethora of dashboards have appeared globally that convey information on the number of people tested, those who are positive, the number of deaths and those who have recovered. This information is constantly being updated and forms the basis on which individuals and governments make important decisions. Everything concerning the pandemic, however, appears to be open to interpretation.


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Politics Home

Misinformation in the coronavirus crisis is putting lives at risk. Clare Lally and Lorna Christie from the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology explain how the conspiracies spread and can be countered.


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New Indian Express

Many distress calls that we cater to nowadays are related to compulsive use of internet and social media leading to health anxiety and somatic complaints


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CNet

For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.


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Rappler

MANILA, Philippines – For many media groups, an attack on one is an attack on all. In a rare show of solidarity, several media groups rallied behind ABS-CBN after the National Telecommunications Commission (NTC) ordered its closure on Tuesday, May 5, 2020.


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This newsletter also covers press freedom, where one of the big issues has been in the Philippines. Here Rappler writes after the government closed broadcaster ABS-CBN.

Social Media Today

Twitter has seen a major jump in usage amid the COVID-19 lockdowns, but it’s also warned of significant impacts on its ad business going forward as part of its first-quarter earnings report for 2020.


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Daily Maverick (South Africa)

Given how the pandemic has expanded our reliance on the internet and for daily necessities like keeping informed and staying connected with our loved ones and communities, the importance of internet access has yet again been underscored. And with the government projecting that September will be when South Africa reaches its peak coronavirus infections, this reliance will only continue to grow. While those of us who live in formality, with monthly incomes, can stay connected to our loved ones, shop online and work from home, this is not the reality for a significant part of our population. Mobile networks should zero-rate news sites and provide low-income consumers with at least 3GB of monthly data and five SMSes per day for free.


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New York Times

America’s extremists are attempting to turn the coronavirus pandemic into a potent recruiting tool both in the deep corners of the internet and on the streets of state capitals by twisting the public health crisis to bolster their white supremacist, anti-government agenda.


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CapX

Last weekend YouTube deleted conspiracy theorist David Icke’s channel.


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Poynter

The International Fact-Checking Network’s WhatsApp chatbot puts the power of the #CoronaVirusFacts Alliance at your fingertips. As of May 4, fact-checking networks in 74 countries have compiled over 4,800 fact-checks in 43 languages.


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Chatbots have emerged as one of the ways that fact-checkers and platforms are working to fight fake news. Here Poynter explains an effort from the International Fact-Checking Network.


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